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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've always wanted a bike and just bought my first bike a month ago - 2017 R3.

It's such a blast to ride, especially for a newbie!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, yea it's got ABS, however north of the border they rape us for the added feature : )
 

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Nice bike. Looks good in black. And welcome to motorcycling.
 

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I've always wanted a bike and just bought my first bike a month ago - 2017 R3.

It's such a blast to ride, especially for a newbie!
Agree, it's an awesome bike for new rider. I just got mine too. Stay safe and be careful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks guys.

I used ABS for the first time last night. I was merging onto the highway, looking at the vehicle I was going to merge in front of (probably spent too much time looking behind me), and while accelerating I look in front of me and the vehicles come to a halting stop (I think 1 vehicle messed everyone up as they didn’t know how to merge properly).

I slam on my brakes and come to almost a sudden stop, but only after ABS kicked in hard. I was amazed how quickly I could stop and how well the bike kept me in a straight line. I felt I could have easily skidded out. I went from 100 km/hr to 10 km/hr in about 1.5-2 seconds. Math could be wrong, but my heart was pumping hard.

Lesson learned. Be careful and watch in front of you especially while accelerating.
 

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Interesting you bring up ABS.. I decided against it when I bought mine. Well that and no option for Team Blue. I was in traffic on the way home yesterday evening and locked up the rear tire coming from about 60mph to a quick stop... I was able to maintain control luckily. Mistakenly, I didn't use front brake at all in tandem (dumb I know and I usually do). Scared the [email protected] out of me! While ABS would have prevented the lockup of course, I think not having it makes you more cognizant and suffice to say maybe even a better rider as you are more in tune with how the bike reacts in that situation. But I suppose the same could be said for having ABS. Or maybe it is just knowing you are in control helps make you more confident.
 

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Interesting you bring up ABS.. I decided against it when I bought mine. Well that and no option for Team Blue. I was in traffic on the way home yesterday evening and locked up the rear tire coming from about 60mph to a quick stop... I was able to maintain control luckily. Mistakenly, I didn't use front brake at all in tandem (dumb I know and I usually do). Scared the [email protected] out of me! While ABS would have prevented the lockup of course, I think not having it makes you more cognizant and suffice to say maybe even a better rider as you are more in tune with how the bike reacts in that situation. But I suppose the same could be said for having ABS. Or maybe it is just knowing you are in control helps make you more confident.
Dude, don't be over confident cause sh** happens, you was fortunate that time imagine if you had your lass on the back? It won't be [email protected] pouring out of you, but out of her as well. I treat it as an learning exercise every time I ride, every time riding is a new experience. ABS or no ABS.
 

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I hear you.. yes had my girl been with me it would have likely been a very different situation. Agree that each ride is different and new learning experience. But I stand by my statement that I feel it it better to learn on a bike without ABS than with it. As expecting to have ABS when you do not has much more dire consequences than the other way around :)
 

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I hear you.. yes had my girl been with me it would have likely been a very different situation. Agree that each ride is different and new learning experience. But I stand by my statement that I feel it it better to learn on a bike without ABS than with it. As expecting to have ABS when you do not has much more dire consequences than the other way around :)
I concur, the 125cc bikes I was learning on had no-ABS so had to learn not to lock the brakes by easing off lightly before you feel them lock, this was part of my first test. We had to get up to 30kmh+ out of a tight (90 degrees) bend and then emergency stop as a red light came on without locking and losing control of the bike or it's a instant fail. I'm not sure if I would like to do it at 60mph without some poo coming out in my behind, but it's good you was able to save it and keep the bike upright.

My first few cars were non-ABS then all my cars after that had ABS as standard. As motor safety progresses, I can only see this becoming standard and not the reverse, as most people use these bikes for everyday use on the public roads, you won't be seeing car manufacturers removing ABS anytime soon.

To conclude: Yes, new learners need to know how to use a bike without ABS in a controlled environment without serious injuries. However, on public roads which is not a controlled environment accidents can be fatal, ABS is a very useful safety aid which can save lives, and reduce the number of serious accidents or fatalities.

Also having ABS does not mean you can go everywhere at 60mph and instantly stop cause you got ABS, that's just asking for trouble. It's there as a safety aid and not a d**k measuring contest on who can stop the fastest, ABS or no ABS.
 

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I could very well be in the minority, but I relish the lack of safety features and rider aids on my R3.

No ABS? - I practice emergency stopping at least once a week and keep practicing until I know where that threshold is - chirping, squirming, etc. Jesse is sending me some new Vesrah pads, so I'm excited for increased feel and initial bite.
No slipper clutch? - practice rev matching and blipping the throttle - to say nothing of how great it sounds when you downshift on your corner approach, bend it in, and gas it out, all while keeping it up in the powerband
No traction control? - work on better throttle control, and on/off transitions, as well as throttle/brake transitions.

The appeal of motorcycling for me is that not everyone can do it. It takes a specialized skill set. The more rider aids they add, the more it opens it up to people who are passive riders (as opposed to active pilots) and that, for me, degrades it a little. But again, I'm probably in the minority - I enjoy aggressively riding (where I'm not a danger to myself or others... yes, I know... the track is the only real place, but we're not all made of $$), and can't fathom the type of rider (harley?) that just cruises around without any body position and and no knowledge of the finer aspects to technical riding.

Twist of the wrist / Total Control / The upper half of the motorcycle - read, learn, apply.
 

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Chelina, I tend to agree and disagree with you here. My Hayabusa is raw, with no safety features (go figure) and it makes you extremely aware of being careful, however, my R1200GS and the R3 has all the bells and whistles and I must say the ABS and traction control on the 1200GS has saved my arse more than once on wet roads when riding hard!

YouTube search "Riding with Tom" (he's a legend), there is a test he does on a YZF125 with no ABS and see what happens to his mate
 

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Here in the UK when i did my bike test in 1983, you would ride around the block a few times, and the examiner would then step out in front of you,and at this point you would initiate a controlled emergency stop, success would give you a full motorcycle licence, if not you would be keeping the learner plates on your bike, and you would have to call an ambulance to get the examiner to the local ER!.

Back then there were no aids, bikes handled like they were made from rubber,brakes were drum type or a weak disk, god knows how we are still alive today, so riding is a skill, and as the guys have mentioned, some times the basic bike, less all the safety technology, is the best way to learn?

keep it shiny side up**
 

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Interesting you bring up ABS.. I decided against it when I bought mine. Well that and no option for Team Blue. I was in traffic on the way home yesterday evening and locked up the rear tire coming from about 60mph to a quick stop... I was able to maintain control luckily. Mistakenly, I didn't use front brake at all in tandem (dumb I know and I usually do). Scared the [email protected] out of me! While ABS would have prevented the lockup of course, I think not having it makes you more cognizant and suffice to say maybe even a better rider as you are more in tune with how the bike reacts in that situation. But I suppose the same could be said for having ABS. Or maybe it is just knowing you are in control helps make you more confident.
I got the 2017 specifically because I wanted ABS. If you don't have ABS thats fine, just realize you can't just jam on the brakes because you will lock up a tire. However, when people say "its not good to learn with ABS" makes zero sense to me. Why wouldn't you want that extra stopping power? After all, you won't need ABS until you need it. If you have to make an emergency stop, how much time do you really have to think clearly about your braking ability?

I think its great to practice quick stopping the old school way of easing on the brakes, sure I can do that... its not that hard. But being able to hit the brakes HARD without having to worry about a tire lockup just is added safety in my book. Riding a motorcycle is dangerous, anything thats makes less likely to die is a +1 in my book.
 

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I got the 2017 specifically because I wanted ABS. If you don't have ABS thats fine, just realize you can't just jam on the brakes because you will lock up a tire. However, when people say "its not good to learn with ABS" makes zero sense to me. Why wouldn't you want that extra stopping power? After all, you won't need ABS until you need it. If you have to make an emergency stop, how much time do you really have to think clearly about your braking ability?

I think its great to practice quick stopping the old school way of easing on the brakes, sure I can do that... its not that hard. But being able to hit the brakes HARD without having to worry about a tire lockup just is added safety in my book. Riding a motorcycle is dangerous, anything thats makes less likely to die is a +1 in my book.
ABS isn't "extra stopping power". It actually is reduced stopping power. But it prevents you from locking up your brakes in hairy situations. Someone who knows how to use their brakes properly can stop quicker than someone activating ABS. ABS is actually a form of trade-off.
 
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