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Hello all!


Im currently deciding if I want to buy a motorcycle. A couple questions for those that own an R3. Ill be using the bike as a primary commuter to and from work and around town. I only live a few miles from work so it wouldn't be long trips. My main reasoning for considering a bike is that my daily driver is a truck that gets 10mpg and the stop and go traffic kills it (and my wallet). Now, I could sell the truck and get a car but that would mean a nice car payment for the next few years (yuck). Plus I'd like to keep the truck for winter with 4wd. Would the R3 be a good commuter bike? also, how are the other costs like maintenance? I know initially it will be expensive with buying gear and everything but IMO its much better than locking myself into a car payment. I appreciate any advice!
 

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It sounds like you answered your own question lol

I'll get 60 mpg doing highway speeds and probably more if I don't drive aggressively. However, with a MPG of 10, any modern bike will be an improvement than your truck hah. You need to zoom out a little bit and look at the motorcycles as a class. R3 is a standard sport bike. Standard bikes have different riding positions than, lets say a super sport bike or cruiser. Standard bikes make for good commuter bikes (generally), while super sports make for bad commuters (generally). IMO R3 is the best in the small displacement line up for commuting and spirited riding. You have an upright riding position. I'm 5'6, so I can also tuck perfectly into the saddle whenever I want. Haven't tracked it yet but i'm sure it'll be a blast.

This forum is rich with information, take a look around and see what you find!
 

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If you are handy (or even if you are not handy) you can cut costs greatly by doing most of the maintenance yourself. You can reserve major maintenance for the dealer.

Many people opt to do maintenance themselves even if they've never done anything prior. To be fair, self maintenance on a motorcycle is MUCH easier than on a car, so there is that. But on the flipside, it is more frequent.

When I got my first motorcycle, I spent roughly 200-300 on tools and accessories for maintenance myself. This includes a torque wrench (plus sockets including hex sockets), a set of combination wrenches, a motorcycle stand (very important), and a digital caliper. If you already have many of the tools you will need, even better. The one thing you will need even if you don't intend to do maintenance yourself is definitely a motorcycle stand so you can lubricate the chain every 500 miles. Especially if you commute, 500 miles comes very quick and that is something you need to be doing yourself.

The first maintenance at 600 miles, even if you spent say 250 on tools, they will pay for themselves when you do your own oil change and chain tightening.

As far as dealership costs goes, it varies, generally just the oil change, chain tightening, and once over involved for the 600 miles costs roughly 200 dollars (U.S.) and major maintenance later on down the road will cost around 1000.00
 

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Welcome! I use my R3 as my daily commuter except on rainy days and its great. The savings on travel expense compared to taking my truck is very significant. I have a 5 km (3 - 4 miles) trip to work and upside on taking the bike is being able to get to and from work quicker as I can weave through traffic. The first service isnt until 1000kms and then the second at 6000kms, the service cost for me here in Australia was $200 AU (approx. $150 USD). Really only maintenance inbetween services is clean and grease the chain and keep an eye on oil levels etc. but really, fluids should be right until next service as it doesnt burn through them. After warranty runs out I never take my bikes to be serviced, but rather service it myself. Servicing isn't hard or time consuming. I always do my chain every 500kms or so and its just a quick 5-10 minute job to do.

Best thing about riding to work is that its a good way to destress as its much more enjoyable than driving. Downside to riding to work is finding the will power and motivation to force yourself to actually go to work rather than keep on riding lol.
 

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I just got into my R3. I previously had a Ninja 300 and although I did not think it would be that much of an improvement I can sure tell you it is. The throttle response is so much better on the R3, the throttle is also a lot less jerky. The rigidity of the R3 is amazing as well as the balance compared to the Ninja 300. The seating position and handlebar position is pretty much the same. The tank is a bit smaller so its slightly slimmer in my opinion. The extra 30CC or so makes me happier hahaha. On the freeway it picks up speed faster and I can stay in gears a bit longer compared to the 300.

I too use my R3 as a commuting vehicle. My trips, although not everyday, are about 20 miles, 5 miles city, 15 miles freeway.
 
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