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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Morning all!

I've got some quick questions about my R3. Please keep in mind that I couldn't be MORE new to this - I've only owned my 2016 R3 for about a month, and I've only racked up 530 miles so far. I'm LOVING the bike!

First, my question is about more "aggressive" riding. When I left the dealership, they told me not to rev the bike past 7000 RPMs the first 600 miles for the break in period. I've followed that rule pretty religiously, but there have been a few instances where I screwed up (kept the clutch in too long, etc.) and revved it up to about 8 or 9. I'm concerned that I could have screwed something up. I figure it's a learning bike, and I'm a learner - so it'll probably be ok.

Second, when is it totally "officially" OK to start getting on the throttle a little more? Can I rev the bike aggressively at 601 miles, or is the 600 thing just an approximation? Again, I want to be responsible and preserve the bike as long as I can, but the temptation to ring it out is pretty great as you know!

Finally - engine braking. I'm not entirely sure that I'm doing it right. I basically just slowly let off the clutch, and the engine revs and the RPMs increase. I've been slowing down at almost every stop in this way. I've worked on rev matching to make sure the downshift is smoother, but I'm still concerned that I may be doing it wrong and screwing up the engine in some way?

Thank you for putting up with my noobness! Have a great day, and happy riding to all!
 

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I went full throttle to about 80 while jumping on the highway leaving my dealership. A lot of guys have taken them straight to the track after purchase.

Don't feel bad about revving it or getting on the gas hard. You won't cause any harm.

You are engine braking wrong. Leaving it in gear is engine braking. What you are doing is just unnecessarily using the clutch. As a new rider, I'd worry far more about learning how to use the brakes (front especially) properly before worrying about engine braking.
 

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The manual says not to have periods of prolonged operation about 7,000 RPM's for the first 600 miles, not to never rev it over 7,000 (the dealership explained this incorrectly to you). I got my bike with 67 miles on it, I've revved it pretty high and I just focus on riding, try to keep it away from redline until the 600 mile mark.

I'm a fan (even with cars) of the hard break in method, however both are up for much debate and generally one hasn't been proven to be better than another. Modern day motors are pretty fantastic and don't require much break in at all, you didn't break it. Just make sure to change your oil if you haven't already and stay up with maintenance.
 

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You're fine. The bike is fine.

You can go full throttle pretty much now.

If you're coming to a predictable stop (traffic light), you don't need to use engine braking. Its fine to just pull in the clutch and use both of your brakes. The bike has a gear indicator, feel free to use it appropriately.

That said, if you aren't riding aggressively, just slowly letting out the clutch is fine when downshifting. Don't get too hung up on perfect rev matching (blipping). A lot of people seem to put way too much energy into it when they have no real need to do it unless you ride in technical areas. A lot of city commuters really don't need to do blip rev matching. The first 2 years of my riding, I kept blipping until I've come to the realization that I freaking living in the city with barely any curves. Its all city blocks and crap, I really had no need for blipping and just started pulling in my clutch and braking and putting it in the needed gear (once again- the bike has a gear indicator! And its much cheaper to replace brake pads). Blipping and rev matching was necessary for city slayers at a time when bikes had no gear indicator. But if you aren't doing technical curves and track riding, you don't necessarily have to ride like that. Obviously it is nice to be able to do it, and by all means, practice it, but as a new rider, there are much more important things to focus on at first.

Take that motovlogger yammienoob (and former member of these forums). He's still fairly a new rider (just a year of riding) and he seemed to have focused way too much on blipping. He is awesome at blipping, almost perfect, if not perfect- yet he has absolutely no need to do it in all his videos. And what happens in his first year? He still crashes in a curve. Because he was cocky and he was still a new rider. But one can argue that is just his personality and he will crash again. Oh well.

There are better things to get down than blipping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you everyone for the input. Seeing what other people say about this stuff is so valuable to me as a new rider. I'm going to not focus on engine braking and rev matching and all of that. It's funny you should mention yammienoob, because he's one of the three or four motovloggers I've been watching a lot of these days (because of his old R3 no doubt). Seeing his videos and others like him were always a "standard" for me as to how to ride an R3 properly. Since I'm new, I've never experienced what "correct" technique feels like on anything. So I just go by what I see on videos and read on forums, and what I discover myself.

Thanks a ton, everyone!
 

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You're fine. The bike is fine.

You can go full throttle pretty much now.

If you're coming to a predictable stop (traffic light), you don't need to use engine braking. Its fine to just pull in the clutch and use both of your brakes. The bike has a gear indicator, feel free to use it appropriately.

That said, if you aren't riding aggressively, just slowly letting out the clutch is fine when downshifting. Don't get too hung up on perfect rev matching (blipping). A lot of people seem to put way too much energy into it when they have no real need to do it unless you ride in technical areas. A lot of city commuters really don't need to do blip rev matching. The first 2 years of my riding, I kept blipping until I've come to the realization that I freaking living in the city with barely any curves. Its all city blocks and crap, I really had no need for blipping and just started pulling in my clutch and braking and putting it in the needed gear (once again- the bike has a gear indicator! And its much cheaper to replace brake pads). Blipping and rev matching was necessary for city slayers at a time when bikes had no gear indicator. But if you aren't doing technical curves and track riding, you don't necessarily have to ride like that. Obviously it is nice to be able to do it, and by all means, practice it, but as a new rider, there are much more important things to focus on at first.

Take that motovlogger yammienoob (and former member of these forums). He's still fairly a new rider (just a year of riding) and he seemed to have focused way too much on blipping. He is awesome at blipping, almost perfect, if not perfect- yet he has absolutely no need to do it in all his videos. And what happens in his first year? He still crashes in a curve. Because he was cocky and he was still a new rider. But one can argue that is just his personality and he will crash again. Oh well.

There are better things to get down than blipping.
Nice Shade:cool:
 
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