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Discussion Starter #1
just bougth a 2017 vivid white R3
just looking for some people to meet up and go ride.
i bought the bike 1 week ago and this weather here in Texas sucks!!
but its starting to look up and just want to go ride

anyone in the fort-worth area?
and what mods should i do?
 

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Refer to my post on buying only what you truly need.
Especially because you're a new rider.

Focus on your (street) riding technique and learn how to read traffic, before you start throwing money at the R3 in modifications.
It's also good to not ride with others for a good long while.

Peer pressure can get you in ways you will instantaneously regret if you make a mistake and lay that pretty bike down.

That peer pressure to perform will also come in a moment, riding with people who have more experience than you.
It's imperative you take your time and not rush your own learning.

Perhaps we can ask ourselves, "How can I improve my riding?" or "How should I go about learning how to read traffic in my area?"
Both questions are highly highly dependent on your locale. Geography matters, laws matter, the way people drive and react matter (and all these variables change based on your location).

Also, refer to this post.

Ride, on!
 

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I left out some important details.
I'm writing a new post (won't be available until tomorrow), regarding tools & equipment that will be a much better investment than mods for the bike.

Basically, as long as you're comfortable riding the bike in its current form, there's no reason to go out of your way to buy addons. Buy stuff when need them.

I will redirect your attention to a new tools-related thread in the How To & DIY section of the forum when I'm in my right mind to type. Tools & equipment (and chemicals) are best bought before you need them.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I left out some important details.
I'm writing a new post (won't be available until tomorrow), regarding tools & equipment that will be a much better investment than mods for the bike.

Basically, as long as you're comfortable riding the bike in its current form, there's no reason to go out of your way to buy addons. Buy stuff when need them.

I will redirect your attention to a new tools-related thread in the How To & DIY section of the forum when I'm in my right mind to type. Tools & equipment (and chemicals) are best bought before you need them.

thank you buddy all this is super helpfull i fell pretty comfortable on the bike still a little nervous about jumping on the freeway. how does this bike perform on the highway
 

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I've created a new discussion based on this post. Join the discussion!

thank you buddy all this is super helpfull i fell pretty comfortable on the bike still a little nervous about jumping on the freeway. how does this bike perform on the highway
Go at your pace (get on the highway when you're comfortable with going with the flow of traffic).

Tips for the highway (places where people end up droning on like mindless robots, no offense):
  • Be comfortable with the fact that you'll be uncomfortable for the first few hours.
  • Give yourself even moredistance ahead to react to changing variables (people changing lanes, stopped traffic, road debris, etc.)
    • My Mom always told me, for every 10mph, you should add one car length ahead of you, as a cushion of time to react to changes.

      This means if you're traveling at 80mph, you should have 8 car lengths ahead to react to changing traffic conditions. If you cannot do this, either slow down, change lanes, or exit the highway until you're more confident in riding.

      I've mentioned this somewhere else... It's taken you this many years to get your motorcycle - there's no reason to rush into it. You got it, you can go anywhere you want to go, but if you rush your learning process, mistakes will be made.
  • Remember to breathe! It's okay to be nervous!

    Breathing helps you process your emotions (I feel like I'm writing to myself too, because I "forget" to breathe; causing myself more anxiety).

    It's best to practice breathing when you're not facing the stress of highway riding - make breathing a technique of focusing on your riding, no matter where you are.

  • Merge at the pace of traffic, no less. You must meet the flow of traffic for them to know you're there, if not just a little faster than the flow(like +5mph (+8kmh))
    • One of the major mistakes motorcyclists make is going too fast, and expecting other drivers to be able to register a motorcycle's presence. Share the road, as they say.
  • Learn how to stay out of people's blind spots (click on the image to view the source article)

    Blind spots are damning for motorcyclists, especially if you're splitting lanes in other driver's blind spots.

  • Check your mirrors & look over your shoulders before changing lanes. If you're in a tuck, you can also look under your shoulder (whatever works for you).
  • If you listen to music, turn it down!
    • It's quite pleasant to listen to music while we ride, but turn it down (or even off) when you're learning a new environment.
    • Generally, you shouldn't listen to music loud, wherever you are (but I do this, so I'd be a hypocrite if I told others not to)
Essentially, when you're spatially aware and know what you have to do to get to your destination safely, you'll become more confident in your ability to ride.

Eventually though (as my Brother told me just last night)...There will come a time when you just have to figure it out for yourself. Find out what works for you, and run with it.

But in the meantime, we're all happy to provide our perspective. As an added benefit, someone else might come across this site with the same question. For the mere fact that you chose to ask for help, means you are helping others, too.

So, thank you for being here and willing to ask for help - because I can say, I'm at a point in my life where not asking for help has become detrimental to the succession of progress in my own life. So thank you for being here!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Go at your pace (get on the highway when you're comfortable with going with the flow of traffic).

Tips for the highway (places where people end up droning on like mindless robots, no offense):
  • Be comfortable with the fact that you'll be uncomfortable for the first few hours.
  • Remember to breathe! It's okay to be nervous!

    Breathing helps you process your emotions (I feel like I'm writing to myself too, because I "forget" to breathe; causing myself more anxiety).

    It's best to practice breathing when you're not facing the stress of highway riding - make breathing a technique of focusing on your riding, no matter where you are.

  • Merge at the pace of traffic, no less. Don't merge fast (or slow) because you're nervous to be on the highway; you must meet the flow of traffic for them to know you're there, if not just a little faster than the flow(like +5mph (+8kmh))
    • One of the major mistakes motorcyclists make is going too fast, and expecting other drivers to be able to register a motorcycle's presence. Share the road, as they say.
  • Learn how to stay out of people's blind spots (click on the image to view the source article)

    Blind spots are damning for motorcyclists, especially if you're splitting lanes in other driver's blind spots.

  • Check your mirrors & look over your shoulders before changing lanes. If you're in a tuck, you can also look under your shoulder (whatever works for you).
  • If you listen to music, turn it down!
    • It's quite pleasant to listen to music while we ride, but turn it down (or even off) when you're learning a new environment.
    • Generally, you shouldn't listen to music loud, wherever you are (but I do this, so I'd be a hypocrite if I told others not to)
Essentially, when you're spatially aware and know what you have to do to get to your destination safely, you'll become more confident in your ability to ride.

Eventually though (as my Brother told me just last night)...There will come a time when you just have to figure it out for yourself. Find out what works for you, and run with it.

But in the meantime, we're all happy to provide our perspective. As an added benefit, someone else might come across this site with the same question. For the mere fact that you chose to ask for help, means you are helping others, too.

So, thank you for being here and willing to ask for help - because I can say, I'm at a point in my life where not asking for help has become detrimental to the succession of progress in my own life. So thank you for being here!
man thank you so much for this info really good to remind ourselves when we hop on the bike. so thank you. just slow down and don't rush
thank you taking time out of your day to respond
 
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