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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, so initially I had planned on a 2017 R3 (for ABS) and over a few months about $2k worth of mods (full exhaust, PCV, quickshifter, clip ons, etc). That being said, it would be 5300 just for the bike (not including taxes and w.e else) plus mods so it would probably end up in the 7-8k mark.

So here's where my question comes in. I WILL be getting a ZX6R in 1-2 years. I may or may not keep the 300, tbh I'll want to keep it, but will probably sell it to put the money towards the new bike.

Now, the actual question. Do I get a Used ninja 300 for 35-4500, or a new R3 for 5300 and instead of doing all the mods just do a M4 Street Slayer. (Will be doing clip ons and levers regardless of the bike).

TLDR: Within 1-2 years very well may be selling 300 for a 600, so should I invest as little as possible in a 300?

On the same note though, I don't mind getting the new R3, just the fact if I get it I'd want to keep it D:


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Buy a bike that you won't be doing too much maintenance on if it is your first bike. My first was a 1999 ex500 and I spent a lot of time doing maintenance. Your first bike should be problem free so you can focus more on riding, not worrying about a possible failure of parts, etc. That said, we are bikers and are going to want to spend money on our ride, so in the end it matters now whether you get a bone stock brand new R3, or a modded N300. You will probably want to mod something.

Me personally, rather than just setting your target right away on getting a zx6r in a year or two, focus on mastering you ride. It's cool to want a bigger bike and what not but so many people have bikes that hey are no where near the riding ability of getting the full potential of the bike. This is my personal opinion but so many people buy sports bikes and don't even ride them in a sporty manner. Learn to really ride your bike. I promise if you owned another bike and went back to the R3, you would appreciate it much more if you truly ride it like a sports bike should be ridden.

If you don't even own the bike yet, stop worrying too much about modding and parts when you don't even know yet what you want out of the bike. Buy an affordable bike and start throwing upgrades at it based of deficiencies you start seeing. I have been riding for 4 years but when I first started, a quick shifter was not on my mind at all. Still isn't. I'm sure it's cool, but I'm no where near track times yet where it matters. I'm not uncomfortable on my daily street ride where it matters.

If you are spending 8k just on the R3 but know you will move to the 6r, just skip the R3 unless you are rich. I promote small bikes every single time because it's so much easier to learn to ride, both for just everyday commuting and for actual sporty riding (specifically track days, "spirited" canyon riding, etc).
 

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It's cool to want a bigger bike and what not but so many people have bikes that hey are no where near the riding ability of getting the full potential of the bike. This is my personal opinion but so many people buy sports bikes and don't even ride them in a sporty manner.
True, but if everyone thought like you do... nobody would ever buy a literbike.
Most people that own a literbike will tell you they are overkill on the street.
But that doesn't stop us from buying them!
:laugh:
 

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True, but if everyone thought like you do... nobody would ever buy a literbike.
Most people that own a literbike will tell you they are overkill on the street.
But that doesn't stop us from buying them!
:laugh:
True, but most riders I've seen who ride liter-bikes are 6ft+ overweight fat-ass who've been chomping on pizzas and burgers all their lives ... riding a 300 is like riding a monkey bike for them, so getting something bigger which is able to cope with their fat-ass is a positive thing :p

Different strokes for different folks, and regardless of size or weight ride whatever you want but stay safe :D
 
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If you are 100% certain you will be upgrading in 1-2 years, go for the used 300 (try to find one with an aftermarket exhaust already on) for minimal depreciation.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Buy a bike that you won't be doing too much maintenance on if it is your first bike. My first was a 1999 ex500 and I spent a lot of time doing maintenance. Your first bike should be problem free so you can focus more on riding, not worrying about a possible failure of parts, etc. That said, we are bikers and are going to want to spend money on our ride, so in the end it matters now whether you get a bone stock brand new R3, or a modded N300. You will probably want to mod something.

Me personally, rather than just setting your target right away on getting a zx6r in a year or two, focus on mastering you ride. It's cool to want a bigger bike and what not but so many people have bikes that hey are no where near the riding ability of getting the full potential of the bike. This is my personal opinion but so many people buy sports bikes and don't even ride them in a sporty manner. Learn to really ride your bike. I promise if you owned another bike and went back to the R3, you would appreciate it much more if you truly ride it like a sports bike should be ridden.

If you don't even own the bike yet, stop worrying too much about modding and parts when you don't even know yet what you want out of the bike. Buy an affordable bike and start throwing upgrades at it based of deficiencies you start seeing. I have been riding for 4 years but when I first started, a quick shifter was not on my mind at all. Still isn't. I'm sure it's cool, but I'm no where near track times yet where it matters. I'm not uncomfortable on my daily street ride where it matters.

If you are spending 8k just on the R3 but know you will move to the 6r, just skip the R3 unless you are rich. I promote small bikes every single time because it's so much easier to learn to ride, both for just everyday commuting and for actual sporty riding (specifically track days, "spirited" canyon riding, etc).


Thank you for the thought out post, the reason I say 1-2 years is because the amount I plan on riding. (Also definitely not rich lol)

And I agree with everything you said as far as learning properly on the 300, I really do. Just like you said there's no reason to getting a bigger bike if you don't have any experience to ride it


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Get a used R3 for $3000 and dont dump any money into it. Sell it later to get the new bike for $2750. I have seen a handful from auction sell for $2000-$2500 once they are for sale on the street again. Some of them need one simple fix to be flawless.

R3 has pretty poor resale and high turnover. No reason to buy new if you are not keeping it long term. Let someone else spend the money.
 

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True, but if everyone thought like you do... nobody would ever buy a literbike.
Most people that own a literbike will tell you they are overkill on the street.
But that doesn't stop us from buying them!
:laugh:
My reply did not come through but I won't agree with no one owning a liter bike with that logic. A lot of people, and you see them on the track or the regular weekend canyon rides if you live in an area with good canyons, are capable of riding a 600 or liter bike at a high level. Amateur racers, and track or canyon junkies. Nothing will stop anyone from buying an overkill bike, I just feel it's silly to own something just begging to be ridden like a true sports bike but not even having the ability to use about a third of its power and capabilities.
 

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My reply did not come through but I won't agree with no one owning a liter bike with that logic. A lot of people, and you see them on the track or the regular weekend canyon rides if you live in an area with good canyons, are capable of riding a 600 or liter bike at a high level. Amateur racers, and track or canyon junkies. Nothing will stop anyone from buying an overkill bike, I just feel it's silly to own something just begging to be ridden like a true sports bike but not even having the ability to use about a third of its power and capabilities.
The same goes for cars such as BMW M series, Mercedes AMG series, VW GTI + R series, Audi S series, Porsche's, Ferrari's, Bugatti's, Zonda's, McLaren's etc. People buy them cause they can and drive them around town at 30 mph speed limit or 5 mph when stuck in traffic, not even using 1/5th of it's power and capabilities. :laugh:

At the end of the day I think you're just preaching to the choir, it's their money they do what they like if it make them happy, then so be it. ;)
 

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I started on different bikes.

fell in love with twisties and the concept that a race bike, race replica is engineered for one purpose to be ridden like a race bike on a track.

So for me the ultimate in motorcycling is to get faster on the track.

that being said, I have had bigger bikes and the r3 is still my favorite.

cost
maintenance
gas usage
weight

Now I am 42 years old, and I dont give a **** about what anyone else thinks. SO if I ride other guys, I truly just ride my ride.

If you ego can handle it.. the r3 or ninja 300 is all the bike you will ever need to have adrenaline pushing fun.

If you feel you need to give a 600 a taste, go for it. they are always out there.

I know people think the r3 is a starter bike, or a great bike for the girlfriend. thats just perception.

And a stock bike, is pretty good
If you plan on reselling the bike. all the goodies and upgrades you put on have almost zero resale value.
its just a sad reality.

those parts are only valuable to you...

Have fun.
dont crash
take the MSF
get out to some track days

find some non hooligans to ride with...
 

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Buy a bike that you won't be doing too much maintenance on if it is your first bike. My first was a 1999 ex500 and I spent a lot of time doing maintenance. Your first bike should be problem free so you can focus more on riding, not worrying about a possible failure of parts, etc. That said, we are bikers and are going to want to spend money on our ride, so in the end it matters now whether you get a bone stock brand new R3, or a modded N300. You will probably want to mod something.
Allow me to share a different opinion. Of course, i do not mean get a bike that is completely thrashed, but maybe a decent 2nd hand bike.

My first bike had quite a number of problems but it's through all the problems i face that i learn about caring for my motorcycle. With those experience, i am now able to identify any faults in my R3 now.

@OP: If you completely new to motorcycle, Ninja 300 would be good bike to learn how to shift gears thanks to its slipper clutch
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Allow me to share a different opinion. Of course, i do not mean get a bike that is completely thrashed, but maybe a decent 2nd hand bike.

My first bike had quite a number of problems but it's through all the problems i face that i learn about caring for my motorcycle. With those experience, i am now able to identify any faults in my R3 now.

@OP: If you completely new to motorcycle, Ninja 300 would be good bike to learn how to shift gears thanks to its slipper clutch


That was one key thing I liked about the Ninja 300, does the slipper clutch make such a huge difference? I saw teamr3racing.com sold a slipper clutch but it was like $800


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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Allow me to share a different opinion. Of course, i do not mean get a bike that is completely thrashed, but maybe a decent 2nd hand bike.

My first bike had quite a number of problems but it's through all the problems i face that i learn about caring for my motorcycle. With those experience, i am now able to identify any faults in my R3 now.

@OP: If you completely new to motorcycle, Ninja 300 would be good bike to learn how to shift gears thanks to its slipper clutch


Not saying I'm gonna buy the slipper clutch just curious how much of a difference t makes


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I started on different bikes.

fell in love with twisties and the concept that a race bike, race replica is engineered for one purpose to be ridden like a race bike on a track.

So for me the ultimate in motorcycling is to get faster on the track.

that being said, I have had bigger bikes and the r3 is still my favorite.

cost
maintenance
gas usage
weight

Now I am 42 years old, and I dont give a **** about what anyone else thinks. SO if I ride other guys, I truly just ride my ride.

If you ego can handle it.. the r3 or ninja 300 is all the bike you will ever need to have adrenaline pushing fun.

If you feel you need to give a 600 a taste, go for it. they are always out there.

I know people think the r3 is a starter bike, or a great bike for the girlfriend. thats just perception.

And a stock bike, is pretty good
If you plan on reselling the bike. all the goodies and upgrades you put on have almost zero resale value.
its just a sad reality.

those parts are only valuable to you...

Have fun.
dont crash
take the MSF
get out to some track days

find some non hooligans to ride with...
Do lots of track days. It's worth more than most mods you will see on your bike. I missed my last one due to rain. Hopefully my upcoming Sunday one will not be missed either.
 

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Allow me to share a different opinion. Of course, i do not mean get a bike that is completely thrashed, but maybe a decent 2nd hand bike.

My first bike had quite a number of problems but it's through all the problems i face that i learn about caring for my motorcycle. With those experience, i am now able to identify any faults in my R3 now.

@OP: If you completely new to motorcycle, Ninja 300 would be good bike to learn how to shift gears thanks to its slipper clutch
My opinion is that you shouldn't use a slipper clutch as a crutch to bad shifting or the inability to learn to shift properly. Learn to shift properly. Use the slipper for what it is, a tool for fast downshifts in the right environment i.e. Trackdays, fast paced canyon rides etc.
 

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Get a used R3 for $3000 and dont dump any money into it. Sell it later to get the new bike for $2750. I have seen a handful from auction sell for $2000-$2500 once they are for sale on the street again. Some of them need one simple fix to be flawless.

R3 has pretty poor resale and high turnover. No reason to buy new if you are not keeping it long term. Let someone else spend the money.
+1

Right on. Low mileage used R3s consistently popping up.

The clear choice.
 

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I was out today on my advanced riding course on a Kawasaki Z300, have to admit the riding position felt more comfortable than the R3 and slipper clutch was easy, I didn't need to blip the throttle on down shifts to rev-match like I do on the R3. Now I can tell the difference between a slipper and non-slipper clutch.
 
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True, but most riders I've seen who ride liter-bikes are 6ft+ overweight fat-ass who've been chomping on pizzas and burgers all their lives ... riding a 300 is like riding a monkey bike for them, so getting something bigger which is able to cope with their fat-ass is a positive thing
It's important to get the right size bike for you.
I see bigger guys on Busa's and ZX-14R's. I see lots of smaller guys on literbikes all the time.
I am 5'10" tall, at 150lbs. I fit on my Fireblade perfectly. A guy I ride with is 5'8" tall, at 140lbs.
He rides a 2015 Yamaha R1.
Look at those WSBK and MotoGP riders, most of them are smaller guys. Jonathan Rea is small.
Rossi is small. Marquez is small.

A big fat guy on a 300cc bike is kinda silly, no doubt. But a smaller guy on a 1000 just means
the bike is even quicker, because it doesn't have to work as hard. We call it: "the rider mod".
:D
 
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