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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Having been riding Yamaha R3 which I purchased brand new back in 2016 and as a brand new rider, fast forward now it seems I went against the modern trend. Instead of upgrading to a larger displacement motorcycle I shifted sideways into a supermoto category to a WR250R 250cc bike which after hundreds of kilometres in the dirt was converted to a supermoto, which I'm having a blast on and if you are interested why, read further.

Supermotos aren't the most popular category to start with. There is only a handful factory made supermotos out there on the market today. The majoroty though are enduro/motocross/dualsport to supermoto conversions by their owners which require wrenching skills and finances. The majority of the supermotos are high maintenance bikes requiring not only the mechanical skills from their owners but the discipline to do the maintenance on time and quite often.

I purchased WR250R because I always wanted to experience what it feels like riding off-road and bite the dust. For a while I had both bikes - R3 and WR250R, each of which had a dedicated purpose. One year ago and after a lot tumbling in the dirt, I minimized my off-road adventure ventures so I decided to to give it a go and convert the WR250R to a supermoto with new supermoto rims, tyres, sprokets for taller gearing, sproket bolts, new chain, 320mm front brake rotor, front caliper relocation bracket (purchased 3 to find the correct one), speedohealer. All of these being essencial parts. For the motorcycle to become alive though one would need to uncork the bike but that's a different topic.

Now to the question what I found so differnt about the WR250R supermoto compared to the R3 supersport that I had. And yes my R3 was a supersport 320cc motrocycle as opposed to the stock version of an R3, which in my opinion is more a sport touring bike. When I rode both bikes side by side interchangeably, I gradually started to realize that a WR250R gives me more freedom and carelesseness on the road. To describe it, the best analogy would be, imagine one switches a car for a motorcycle and that freedom that person feels. You get another level of freedom when you step up from a supersport into a supermoto category. Now you really don't care about lowsiding, dropping, going over curbs, bumps, off roading, manouvering in traffic, etc. It's fun to ride a supermoto as most riders would describe their experience.

You get different feelings from R3 and WR250R at the track also. While you carefully navigate R3 around the track thiking about the bill for replacement parts and your time spent restoring it if you happen to lose traction and lowside, you go berserk on WR250R becuse you don't care! This bike will withstand any beating and no matter how "badly" to an extent I tried to lose traction, it just wouldn't, it would go as low as it physically can scratching footpegs and your boots, it will trailbrake into the corners so fast that it will fly past any larger displacement motorcycle. You just do whatever you will and WR250R will do it.

Eventually I started noticing that I was riding WR250R more than R3 in everyday riding until one day I realised that R3 does not bring me joy anymore and the time has come to part. It's sold now. R3 was a very cool bike I spent 5 years on, I know this motorcycle inside out literraly and it never failed on me.

I am not sure if I would go for any larger displacement bike in the nearest future, although I will be considering an R1 just for raw power for intercity/interstate long distance weekend highway riding capability which will match my personality and character.


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Variety is the spice of life! R1 is one of the most committed riding position sportbikes if I understand correctly. Rumor is a 689cc R7 is on the way.
 

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I enjoyed your story... I went the other way. I started doing track days on a supermotos. I started on a DRZ400SM, (nice for the street, but not so much on a track). I then build a track-only CRF450R, and Husky SMR450. The CRF was a much nicer bike, and I regret ever selling it. As for the Husky, I never really liked it- no matter how much money I threw at it. It just didn't handle as well as the Honda. Like you said, you can make sooo many mistakes on track with a SM, and the bike just "handles" it. After a few seasons of the constant wrenching, I moved on. I like riding more than wrenching. I currently track a 2016 FZ-07 that is my track-only bike, and a 2019 R3 for the street. I do miss the SM days, but like that I can roll my bike into the trailer, and roll it back out the next rack day, without even opening a toolbox :cool:-
 

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That's good write up. The only bit that I'd personally dispute, is that I've never ridden a bike that doesn't bring me joy, at some level or other.

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