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Discussion Starter #1
Does anybody have any +HP data on the few performance parts that are currently available?


Also wondering if the 321cc motor is used anywhere else in Yamaha's lineup?


Thanks!
 

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Does anybody have any +HP data on the few performance parts that are currently available?


Also wondering if the 321cc motor is used anywhere else in Yamaha's lineup?


Thanks!
It's an all-new motor developed just for the R3. Down the road maybe they'll put it in a naked version (an FZ-03?) or in a dual sport like Honda did with their CBR250R motor in the CRF250L.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info. I was hoping they might share the same architecture with an ATV or something else in the lineup. Much the same way that an RZ350 became a Banshee and that would give the R3 guys a head start on just how far they can take the little 321cc twin.


I am excited about this bike, not because it is touted as a beginner's bike, but that it holds a lot of promise for a one-design racing class. I'm sure that in 6 months we will know exactly how much potential this little puppy has.
 

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Thanks for the info. I was hoping they might share the same architecture with an ATV or something else in the lineup. Much the same way that an RZ350 became a Banshee and that would give the R3 guys a head start on just how far they can take the little 321cc twin.


I am excited about this bike, not because it is touted as a beginner's bike, but that it holds a lot of promise for a one-design racing class. I'm sure that in 6 months we will know exactly how much potential this little puppy has.
I don't buy the whole "It's Only A Beginner Bike" thing. I've owned bikes from 50cc up to 1,700cc and I've found that when I eventually sell each one, the smaller displacement bikes ALWAYS have much higher mileage on them than the larger ones (with the exception of touring bikes I've owned).

This bike is a blast to ride. Light weight makes it flickable/easier to steer and the lower power makes it more difficult to get into trouble with. The last Sport Bike I had before this one was a 1995 Ducati 916 Senna Edition that was, personally speaking, much too powerful for my skill level (I've done the California Superbike School and had several track days over the years, but never raced).

I sold the Ducati, regretfully, because it was too tempting to push it to its limits, which were far, far beyond my own, especially taking into consideration the slower reaction times that come with aging (hate that whole aging thing!). I don't feel like that with the R3.

I read somewhere recently that they are starting a national 350cc class racing series and JBluetooth (forum member) is prepping an R3 for a 350 Supersport Class race series at Chuckwalla Raceway in Desert Center, California

http://www.yamahar3racing.com/
 

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I'm not sure I buy it's a beginner bike either, at least not in terms of easy to ride. It's not hard to ride, but there are easier bikes to learn on...the Grom, most small scooters although you don't learn shifting, most of the 250 cruisers like the Rebel and GZ250, Star250. My CB300F is easier to ride due in large part to the 20-lbs. lighter weight. I'm thinking about smaller people now though. If you are taller and heavier, the bikes I mentioned wouldn't be that much easier. If you are a 5'5" 120 lb. female, they will be. The dead giveaway is the bikes they supply for an MSF course. Those are beginner bikes.
 

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Even with cars this is the case. It's always fun to have a 'slower' bike you can ride fast than a faster bike you have to ride slow.
 

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My most recent big bike was a Suzuki Hayabusa that I put 25k miles on before selling it a few years ago. Again, it was a slow-down in cognitive function that made me sell it before I started writing checks my brain couldn't cash. Also, didn't want to deal with the potential loss of license and considerable expense that comes when the popo catches you doing 120mph+ on public roads.


Some of my favorite bikes out of many were the small ones. Specifically, the RZ350, RD350 & GPz550.
 

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My most recent big bike was a Suzuki Hayabusa that I put 25k miles on before selling it a few years ago. Again, it was a slow-down in cognitive function that made me sell it before I started writing checks my brain couldn't cash. Also, didn't want to deal with the potential loss of license and considerable expense that comes when the popo catches you doing 120mph+ on public roads.


Some of my favorite bikes out of many were the small ones. Specifically, the RZ350, RD350 & GPz550.
I REALLY loved my RZ350 (there's one available at Steele's Cycles in Denver right now for $6,495!) and rode a Suzuki GS450 (ugly, plain jane UJM) all over the California Sierras when I lived in Davis and Sacramento from 1978 to 1989. I also had a Moto Guzzi V50 back then, and, though not really a lightweight, it was lots of fun in the twisties, too.

At the same time I had a Honda CX500 Turbo that made for a great Sport Tourer for longer multi-day trips.
 

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My bike is still at Bazzaz, but we will start doing performance tests on different exhaust setups very soon, next couple weeks I expect.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
My bike is still at Bazzaz, but we will start doing performance tests on different exhaust setups very soon, next couple weeks I expect.

Thanks! I check your excellent blog every day for updates.:)



I forgot where I read it but somebody was saying that one could cut the cats out of the stock pipes?


I also remember seeing something about the slip-ons making about the same power as the full systems?


I don't know if this is a pipe dream or what, but something north of 50 hp without going too deep into the engine would be too cool.


Any comments you may have are appreciated.
 

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I REALLY loved my RZ350 (there's one available at Steele's Cycles in Denver right now for $6,495!) and rode a Suzuki GS450 (ugly, plain jane UJM) all over the California Sierras when I lived in Davis and Sacramento from 1978 to 1989. I also had a Moto Guzzi V50 back then, and, though not really a lightweight, it was lots of fun in the twisties, too.

At the same time I had a Honda CX500 Turbo that made for a great Sport Tourer for longer multi-day trips.


I sold my RZ350 when I moved from Ventura to Aspen. I think I got about what I bought it for new...it was perfect and had the Toomey chambers & kit on it. Also had some mild porting done by Spec II.


If you look at the some of the numbers on the RZ350 and the R3 they are virtually identical: weight, rake, trail, wheelbase and stock horsepower.


While it won't be possible to get the hp gains as easily as it was on the 2 stroke, I think Yamaha is getting ready to rock with the R3!
 

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Thanks! I check your excellent blog every day for updates.:)



I forgot where I read it but somebody was saying that one could cut the cats out of the stock pipes?


I also remember seeing something about the slip-ons making about the same power as the full systems?


I don't know if this is a pipe dream or what, but something north of 50 hp without going too deep into the engine would be too cool.


Any comments you may have are appreciated.
I plan on cutting the cats out of the stock pipe and doing a dyno tune to see how it does compared to a full system. On bikes like this where the cat and muffler are both in the header, the slip-on doesn't change much. Generally, a full system gains around 10%, and with a supersport build, can be as high as 20%. But with the bike putting around 37 to the rear wheel stock, I'd say we'll be lucky to get 45, even with a full supersport build, full system, decked head, cam timing, etc. Probably just over 40 with a full system. And in my race class, I can't modify the intake, the snorkel must remain, so that will definitely hurt HP.
 

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Even with cars this is the case. It's always fun to have a 'slower' bike you can ride fast than a faster bike you have to ride slow.
That reminds me of one of the coolest cars I used to own and still wish I had. It was a 1984 Mercedes 190D (diesel) 5 speed, 4 cylinder sedan with 70 something horsepower that I dub'd my Columbo Car. Boy was that a blast to row through the gears. It got awesome gas mileage, was slower than everything else on the road, and even ran on used cooking oil we got from fast food restaurants! I had the whole city in an In n Out contact high! LOL
 

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Arguably one of the prettiest motorcycles ever made.


Did you consider putting it in your living room, pop a fine red wine and just look at it?
Yep, it broke my heart to sell it, but I was concerned that if I kept it I wouldn't be able to resist riding it , and IT would end up breaking ME! What with all that Cognitive Decline you mentioned.

I had a near high side one Winter on a mountain road in February on a downhill/uphill. decreasing radius, hairpin turn that slid me over the center line about a foot (no oncoming traffic, fortunately). After the adrenaline shakes stopped, I continued home and, after reflecting on that incident and acknowledging my noticeably slower reaction times, I listed it on Craigslist that night. It sold so quickly I didn't have time to have second thoughts about selling.

I sold it 10 years ago with 13,000 miles on the clock for $3,000 more than I paid for it new in '95. That's about the only time that ever happened, since I'm a founding member of the "Buy High, Sell Low" club.

I had traded in a 1987 Cagiva/Ducati Paso 750 to buy it and decided I didn't want another red motorcycle (to be a bit stealthier and harder to target by the ticket writers). It worked, sort of...
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I plan on cutting the cats out of the stock pipe and doing a dyno tune to see how it does compared to a full system. On bikes like this where the cat and muffler are both in the header, the slip-on doesn't change much. Generally, a full system gains around 10%, and with a supersport build, can be as high as 20%. But with the bike putting around 37 to the rear wheel stock, I'd say we'll be lucky to get 45, even with a full supersport build, full system, decked head, cam timing, etc. Probably just over 40 with a full system. And in my race class, I can't modify the intake, the snorkel must remain, so that will definitely hurt HP.




Great info!


Do you know what sprockets you're going to run?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yep, it broke my heart to sell it, but I was concerned that if I kept it I wouldn't be able to resist riding it , and IT would end up breaking ME! What with all that Cognitive Decline you mentioned.

I had a near high side one Winter on a mountain road in February on a downhill/uphill. decreasing radius, hairpin turn that slid me over the center line about a foot (no oncoming traffic, fortunately). After the adrenaline shakes stopped, I continued home and, after reflecting on that incident and acknowledging my noticeably slower reaction times, I listed it on Craigslist that night. It sold so quickly I didn't have time to have second thoughts about selling.

I sold it 10 years ago with 13,000 miles on the clock for $3,000 more than I paid for it new in '95. That's about the only time that ever happened, since I'm a founding member of the "Buy High, Sell Low" club.

I had traded in a 1987 Cagiva/Ducati Paso 750 to buy it and decided I didn't want another red motorcycle (to be a bit stealthier and harder to target by the ticket writers). It worked, sort of...

I had (2) Ducatis: 1987 F1-B and a 1990 888 SP2 when I lived in Los Angeles.


PS I won't ask why you were riding on a mountain road in February in Colorado ? :eek:
 

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I had (2) Ducatis: 1987 F1-B and a 1990 888 SP2 when I lived in Los Angeles.


PS I won't ask why you were riding on a mountain road in February in Colorado ? :eek:
Well, we had a sunny day where it hit 50F and I took advantage of it while it lasted. Didn't see the bit of sand on the road that I hit. It was a remote road (up near Deckers, CO), but I saw a couple dozen other motorcyclist on it while I was out.

I'll ride down to 40F with my 4-season jacket and a heated vest. Lower than that, for me, isn't any fun anymore.

Your Ducatis were nice bikes, but then, aren't they all?

I lived in Santa Barbara for a while and bought parts/accessories at Pro Italia in Glendale.
 

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Well, we had a sunny day where it hit 50F and I took advantage of it while it lasted. Didn't see the bit of sand on the road that I hit. It was a remote road (up near Deckers, CO), but I saw a couple dozen other motorcyclist on it while I was out.

I'll ride down to 40F with my 4-season jacket and a heated vest. Lower than that, for me, isn't any fun anymore.

Your Ducatis were nice bikes, but then, aren't they all?

I lived in Santa Barbara for a while and bought parts/accessories at Pro Italia in Glendale.

Pro Italia, the Clubhouse, the Crest, the bikes & the camaraderie.



Yes, those were great times!
 
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