Yamaha R3 Forums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
After a two hour ride today in super hot weather(90 degree), thanks to the technology of perforated leather I did not get drowned. Got me thinking that how's everyone riding in winter when it's down to 30s/40s?
Do you guys just get an inner suit for your leather jacket/pants/suit or get another leather suit for the winter?


Riding in textile pants(pending on leather pants upgrade) makes me feel like leather could even be more comfy in the summer(not to mention winter) with the extra protection it offers
I know most people don't ride in winter but it will be inevitable for me in a few months. It is early but I am just planning ahead(to get good deals too)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
I don't ride in the winter unless we get a "warm snap" - I'm a wuss that way and unless it's over 50 I won't go out. With that said, I'm not judging...

Leathers are going to keep you warmer than textiles, because they allow less wind through. Even then, you'll want some thermal underwear or other undergarment. Snowmobile suits are the thing for the more hard-core (sub-freezing weather) riders. You can also get heated leather inserts, gloves and boots - these would require a power supply mod for the R3.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
In WA state, I can almost ride all year long. But I do ride in 36 degrees lowest max. Last winter, I recall many nice 35-37 degree weather Nov-Feb where I always went out. Anything above 45 was a warm riding day during the winter. I did initially go out in 33 degrees with snow lining the streets, but after that I decided not to do that again, so I never go out in freezing temp.

But this is what I wore. Thermal under liner pants. Regular riding pants over it. This was good enough for my legs. My upper area on the other hand required thermal long sleeve under shirt, a t-shirt, a sweater, then my textile jacket which also has its own removable liner which I kept in. I also had a neck sleeve thingy from alpine stars. I had to wear liners under my gloves. I also have cold weather gloves but I hate using it because I lose a lot of tactile and dexterity, so I opt to just use my regular gloves with the liner glove.

My biggest issue are the gloves. My body and legs are fine, my hands are in pain. Even if I were using my cold weather gloves. I can only tolerate 35-40 minutes, and by then my hands are in complete cold pain.

This summer I bought a leather jacket so I'll see how that fairs in 36 degrees. Guessing I might not need to wear the sweater, not like I can the leather jacket is super snug. But that really doesn't matter because its the hands that hold me back.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,264 Posts
In WA state, I can almost ride all year long. But I do ride in 36 degrees lowest max. Last winter, I recall many nice 35-37 degree weather Nov-Feb where I always went out. Anything above 45 was a warm riding day during the winter. I did initially go out in 33 degrees with snow lining the streets, but after that I decided not to do that again, so I never go out in freezing temp.

But this is what I wore. Thermal under liner pants. Regular riding pants over it. This was good enough for my legs. My upper area on the other hand required thermal long sleeve under shirt, a t-shirt, a sweater, then my textile jacket which also has its own removable liner which I kept in. I also had a neck sleeve thingy from alpine stars. I had to wear liners under my gloves. I also have cold weather gloves but I hate using it because I lose a lot of tactile and dexterity, so I opt to just use my regular gloves with the liner glove.

My biggest issue are the gloves. My body and legs are fine, my hands are in pain. Even if I were using my cold weather gloves. I can only tolerate 35-40 minutes, and by then my hands are in complete cold pain.

This summer I bought a leather jacket so I'll see how that fairs in 36 degrees. Guessing I might not need to wear the sweater, not like I can the leather jacket is super snug. But that really doesn't matter because its the hands that hold me back.
If you ride much in cold weather, get a set of Oxford HEATERZ heated grips.

Thye go on sale periodically for around $65.

I have them on my CB500X and they work great!

View attachment 16602

http://www.ebay.com/itm/OXFORD-Heat...692-/291509002124?hash=item43df4a5f8c&vxp=mtr

If it's really cold out I throw on a pair of these Tusk handlebar mitts, too. Otherwise, they stay in my tank bag.

tusk.JPG

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Tusk-Hand-C...ets-/281571414922?hash=item418ef6d38a&vxp=mtr
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
I'd go for heated gloves over heated grips. Grips won't do much for your fingertips or the backs of your fingers, which are the parts most susceptible to frostbite. Unless you use those mitts of course.

Your hands will stay warm for a while if you keep your central body very warm (either with insulation, chemical heaters or an electric vest), but if you have any Raynaud's or other circulation problems, or if you plan to ride longer than an hour or two in cold weather, you'll want heated gloves.


ETA - whatever you get for winter, as you found out with your leather, buy it big enough that you can put insulating base layers underneath and still allow plenty of movement and circulation. You'll get colder if you cut off your circulation with glove liners and/or layers of socks under your summer gloves and boots, than you would if you wore no insulation at all.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,264 Posts
I'd go for heated gloves over heated grips. Grips won't do much for your fingertips or the backs of your fingers, which are the parts most susceptible to frostbite. Unless you use those mitts of course.

Your hands will stay warm for a while if you keep your central body very warm (either with insulation, chemical heaters or an electric vest), but if you have any Raynaud's or other circulation problems, or if you plan to ride longer than an hour or two in cold weather, you'll want heated gloves.


ETA - whatever you get for winter, as you found out with your leather, buy it big enough that you can put insulating base layers underneath and still allow plenty of movement and circulation. You'll get colder if you cut off your circulation with glove liners and/or layers of socks under your summer gloves and boots, than you would if you wore no insulation at all.
Yes, keep the core warm and everything else stays warm longer. I also have an ANSAI Mobile Warming heated vest if I really need it. Runs for 5-8 hours off a lithium battery so no connections to the bike are needed. It's VERY toasty.

I also have a pair of HELD Twin GTX dual chamber gloves that let me have an extra layer over the front of my fingers if necessary. No issues using those AND the heated grips. My hands can stay warm down to 25 or 30 F, though I've rarely ridden at those temps. I will sometimes ride in temps down as low as 40 degrees F or so as long as there's no wind to speak of and the roads are dry.

With Reynaud's you'd probably want all of the above....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts
I ride 80 miles a day. Every day there is no ice on the road which is unfortunately April through November where I live. My riding days and milage went up 50% when I bought my full set of heated liners. Jacket, pants, and glove liners. I have only ever turned them on high once when I was traveling out of town through pouring rain for four hours and was soaked through in 50F temps. Normally if you aren't too lazy to stop and put on your rain gear so you are dry, heated liners will keep you toasty down to 15F. I went with Venture Heat brand but most brands are probably pretty good.
.
http://www.ventureheat.com/power-sports/45-motorcycle-heated-jacket-liner.html
.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I ride 80 miles a day. Every day there is no ice on the road which is unfortunately April through November where I live. My riding days and milage went up 50% when I bought my full set of heated liners. Jacket, pants, and glove liners. I have only ever turned them on high once when I was traveling out of town through pouring rain for four hours and was soaked through in 50F temps. Normally if you aren't too lazy to stop and put on your rain gear so you are dry, heated liners will keep you toasty down to 15F. I went with Venture Heat brand but most brands are probably pretty good.
.
http://www.ventureheat.com/power-sports/45-motorcycle-heated-jacket-liner.html
.
Sucks to be in Syracuse for the ride :crying:
that was one reason made me left New York to California for short riding season
I believe it'll only get down to 40s here that I doubt I'd get heated gears, but venture does look pretty interesting(I saw mitt in NYC back in the days but not knowing they might have heated jacket)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
And as long as we're talking about base layers - two words: merino wool.
trying it out with some cheaper alternative with uniqlo's heat tech stuff
http://www.uniqlo.com/au/store/men/innerwear-lounge/heattech.html

since winter is pretty mild here in San jose(lowest is 40s I believe) that I should be alright with something less fancy and less expensive
just finding the right gear on the outer layer is what I have in mind now(rs taichi only got perforated leather jacket/pants/racesuit, don't know if it is enough)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The Tourmaster Flex is the most versatile sport touring jacket. It is one of the only convertible jackets that has the shell on the outside. All summer long it is 60F in the morning where I am and 85F in the afternoon so I take the shell off and ride home in mesh with only a small piece to carry.
.
.
http://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/tour-master-flex-3-jacket
.
.
yup same on mine except i'm on taichi leather(vented, feels more ventilated than my textile pants). I had the similar concept with textile does better than leather until trying this brand, just simply amazing on what technology can do nowadays. Just the downside is the weight on leather compared to textile(and cost, but minor if I can use the same jacket for years and years)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
I have a Goretex textile jacket that I wear below 50 degrees. By far for me, my most important winter item is my windproof neck gaiter that I cinch up between my lower lip and my chin. My helmet strap then holds it in place. Similar to this one, http://www.cyclegear.com/SEDICI-CLOSE-THERMIC-Chest-Guard No cold air gets through at all. I got mine at Campmor years ago, but they don't carry it anymore. I would imagine the one in my link would work about the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,264 Posts
Waterproof Cold Weather Gloves Buying Guide

Not comprehensive, but a good sampling of the current crop of WP gloves.

http://www.motorcycle.com/buyers-gu...o20151006&utm_term=Motorcycle Now Subscribers

Note: STG still has the SIDI Deep WP glove on closeout for $30 (a $140 savings over MSRP)

Add a liner to extend their temp range and carry some heat packs just in case...and order up one size as they are a Euro-fit glove = TIGHT!

http://www.sportbiketrackgear.com/sidi-deep-gloves-black-special-buy/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top