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It's been years since I've ridden, but I recall being nervous when initiating a turn from a full stop. Any tips on the proper way to do this? Do I just need to practice more to get rid of those jitters?

I can start fine in a straight line, but as soon as I have to turn either left or right I get nervous. I've heard that stopping further back from the line helps, so I have a tiny bit of "straightaway" helps, but I'd like to know how to do it properly.
 

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I remember it being weird for me too when I first started riding. Turning from a dead stop requires you to steer towards the turn instead of counter-steering like you would at speed. The idea is to steer into the turn to keep the bike from falling over since you don't have the centrifugal force from the wheels spinning fast like you would otherwise. Start taking off from the dead stop with the wheel straight, then lean the bike like normal, steering into the turn, then as you gain speed you'll transition back to a counter-steer.

The best thing to do is just look at where you want to go and not think about it too much. Trying to go slower than normal will only make things harder. Twist the throttle and just do it.... haha. It's hard to teach on a forum. Practice makes perfect though just like everything else. Maybe practice in an open parking lot?
 

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Go to a large empty parking lot and practice practice.

A lot of things.

turning from a dead stop.

learn clutch and throttle control.

learn how to emergency stop without skidding.

If you dont have the book.
https://www.alibris.com/Proficient-...de-to-Riding-Well-David-L-Hough/book/23700224

99 cents used on alibris. cant beat it.

David L hough is the founder of MSF.

I spent many hours at the empty parking lot near my house practicing things to become 2nd nature.
Now I spend almost all of my time at trackdays learning as well.

Have fun. Be thankful the bike is light enough that a slow speed tipover isn't the end of the world.
 

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Practice clutch control and look through your turn to where you want to go. If you stare at the road in front of you, that's where you will end up. The first time I took my new bike out, I was nervous and made the mistake of doing everything wrong and almost ran into the centre median making a right turn from a complete stop. It quickly reminded me that everything I learned in my course is very important. After that initial scare, I practiced slow speed maneuvering using clutch control and rear brake in a parking lot, which basically is what you're are doing at the start of your turn, and trust me, that helped a lot with my confidence with the bike overall. It is harder to maneuver a slow moving bike for sure. Once you have that down, look where you want to go and the bike will take you there.
 
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Here's a good tutorial I was looking at, on turning from a stop, by MC Rider on YouTube which maybe helpful


worth watching :)
 
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I think target fixation is key here! It is the detriment of many crashes. As discussed.. Looking where you want to go works every time! I am guilty of looking down too often myself. It is a hard habit to break.. especially new riders.
 

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The R3 or any "supersport" style bike with low, short clipons will always have some shaky turns from a stop. Its just physics based on the (lack of ) leverage the clipons provide.

If ever you get on a naked bike with handlebars (or a cruiser), you will be blown away at how easy they are turn from a stop.

Anyway, to help you out at the start, try to stop the bike at an angle (in relation to the street) towards the direction you will be turning so you will have to turn the handles less.
 

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While your making a turn from stop at slow speed, try to avoid "grabbing" at the brakes which can potentially lead to a tip over. Instead I try to lightly tap the rear to maintain a bit of control when necessary. But it's been said before, and it will be said again...practice, practice, practice. There are also many resources out there (schools, programs, track days, etc...) to make you a better rider, you just have to look into them.
 
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