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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I sat on an R3 today and only the balls of my feet touch the ground. Now I can hold it up like this no problem, but my fear is that I would have issues at like elevated stop lights, driveways, anything slanted etc.

The R3 is going to be my first bike and I am going to be taking the MSF course in a couple weeks. I am just doing all the research I can because I REALLY REALLY REALLY want to do all that I can to prevent droping/laying my bike down. Would buy used if I could but I don't have the capital to pay outright for a bike from a private party and used dealers are selling these bikes just as much as new ones.

Thanks! Look forward to be a part of this awesome community!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Wow I just realized I didn't ask a question. Now is this going to affect me at all? Am I going to have issues? I really don't want to mess with the bike ergonomics or anything like that if I don't have to. I've read that that's like the last thing you really want to do to a bike is lower it.
 

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there are some members on here that have lowered their bikes, search around and you should be able to find the threads

every new rider is going to drop his very first bike, Iv dropped mine 3 times, 2 lowsides and one time taking it off the rear stand whilst forgetting my kickstand was still up d'oh! (arnold schwarzenegger voice) new riders dropping bikes is inevitable, **** even seasoned/experienced guys drop their bikes!

btw welcome!
 

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I remember reading somewhere that you could do motocross stop.
Stop with one leg on peg, shifting your behind to the side and standing on ground with other foot.

pic from google.
 

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Not every rider drops their first bike. I didn't. I do believe every rider will drop a bike though.

I never dropped my first bike. I wrecked my second bike (bnew 650) dropped my other 650 a few times, my zx6r after that was knocked over by some lady at work, and I lowsided my r3 at the race track lol.

Besides the technique shown above, there are boots out there with thick soles that can help flat foot if you aren't too short.

Make sure to invest in some frame sliders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
there are some members on here that have lowered their bikes, search around and you should be able to find the threads

every new rider is going to drop his very first bike, Iv dropped mine 3 times, 2 lowsides and one time taking it off the rear stand whilst forgetting my kickstand was still up d'oh! (arnold schwarzenegger voice) new riders dropping bikes is inevitable, **** even seasoned/experienced guys drop their bikes!

btw welcome!
I really hope to prove you wrong lol. Or else my OCD is going to get the best of me when I drop it :crying:

But I definitely will be investing in sliders for protection.
 

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I lowered my R3 1.5 in. Rides the same as far as my wife and I are concerned. But it's a really lightweight bike. If you have somewhat average strength/dexterity abilities, you'll be fine, just really try to get the feel for the bike before attempting to stop on hills and whatnot.

On a side note, will the sliders protect the entire fairing if the bike is dropped on its side at a standstill? ie gravel, shoelaces, didn't straighten wheel, etc. I'm getting mixed reviews about their usefulness
 

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If the balls of your feet touch the ground, that's plenty good enough. I have pretty short legs and I never flat foot any bike besides a Honda rebel. I never even flat footed the 125cc cbr I used in riding school. My girlfriend is on her toes on any bike she rides.
 

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I lowered my R3 1.5 in. Rides the same as far as my wife and I are concerned. But it's a really lightweight bike. If you have somewhat average strength/dexterity abilities, you'll be fine, just really try to get the feel for the bike before attempting to stop on hills and whatnot.

On a side note, will the sliders protect the entire fairing if the bike is dropped on its side at a standstill? ie gravel, shoelaces, didn't straighten wheel, etc. I'm getting mixed reviews about their usefulness
You lowered the front and rear the same amount? If so then the geometry shouldnt have changed too much, if any. But if you dropped just the forks, then your steering should become much more responsive. Inversely, if you drop just the rear end, then that is somewhat similar to raising the forks, which stabilizes the bike, or makes it less responsive to inputs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You lowered the front and rear the same amount? If so then the geometry shouldnt have changed too much, if any. But if you dropped just the forks, then your steering should become much more responsive. Inversely, if you drop just the rear end, then that is somewhat similar to raising the forks, which stabilizes the bike, or makes it less responsive to inputs.
If I do decide to go this route and lower it, am I going to have any issues with bottoming out or anything? Say if I inevitably have to go over a speed bump or something?
 

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On a side note, will the sliders protect the entire fairing if the bike is dropped on its side at a standstill? ie gravel, shoelaces, didn't straighten wheel, etc. I'm getting mixed reviews about their usefulness
Soon after putting on my Shogun frame sliders, I tipped my bike coming to a standstill at the top of a very steep hill with intention to turn right. The wheel was turned a bit, and next thing I knew, the bike leaned over to the right past where I could hoist it back up.

Very slight scratches at the sides of the front and tail fairing, also on exhaust. Mirror and front turn signals too. But I think without the sliders, the whole side of the front fairing would have had a big nasty scratch.

I can't vouch for how much good / harm they would do in a high speed spill.
 

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You lowered the front and rear the same amount? If so then the geometry shouldnt have changed too much, if any. But if you dropped just the forks, then your steering should become much more responsive. Inversely, if you drop just the rear end, then that is somewhat similar to raising the forks, which stabilizes the bike, or makes it less responsive to inputs.
I had my R3 lowered with the T-Rex Links and Soupy's Adjustable Kickstand. I haven't measured the distance the front was lowered because I assumed the same as the rear. I'm just happy it all worked out, makes the ride a lot more enjoyable, or, I should say, makes coming to stops a lot easier for me as I'm definitely lacking in the strength department atm.

I did the fender eliminator myself as well as the brake and clutch levers myself but was definitely not confident enough to lower it myself haha

As for speed bumps, I can't say for sure, but I'd approach with caution. I'd try to steer clear and go around. If I can't go around them, I guess I'd just go really slow or try to walk the bike over it.. good question! I'll try to find some speed bumps and see lol

The angles in the pic aren't identical but hopefully helpful enough
 

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So I sat on an R3 today and only the balls of my feet touch the ground. Now I can hold it up like this no problem, but my fear is that I would have issues at like elevated stop lights, driveways, anything slanted etc.

The R3 is going to be my first bike and I am going to be taking the MSF course in a couple weeks. I am just doing all the research I can because I REALLY REALLY REALLY want to do all that I can to prevent droping/laying my bike down. Would buy used if I could but I don't have the capital to pay outright for a bike from a private party and used dealers are selling these bikes just as much as new ones.

Thanks! Look forward to be a part of this awesome community!
Steve, assuming your first bike means just beginning to ride, first place to start is Attitude. It can definitely be a determining factor whether you own the bike or the bike owns you. It will help you both ride smart and stop smart. I'm not convinced that "all newbs will drop their bike". The only thing that new riders lack is confidence, and that will come after time.

Wow I just realized I didn't ask a question. Now is this going to affect me at all? Am I going to have issues? I really don't want to mess with the bike ergonomics or anything like that if I don't have to. I've read that that's like the last thing you really want to do to a bike is lower it.
It may affect you if you let it. You may have issues if you allow it. I am, as you put it "vertically challenged" also (28" inseam). This is my third bike and I have never dropped or layed any of them down. Front end slide making a U-turn over loose gravel on asphalt, yes. But, never put myself in a bad stop situation. Lowering my bike raised my confidence expotentially without any noticable effect on steering. I do enjoy the twistys and canyons a bit, but I have no intentions of dragging a knee.

It's all up to you,
Randy
 

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Sorry if I missed it, but what's your inseam Steve?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Steve, assuming your first bike means just beginning to ride, first place to start is Attitude. It can definitely be a determining factor whether you own the bike or the bike owns you. It will help you both ride smart and stop smart. I'm not convinced that "all newbs will drop their bike". The only thing that new riders lack is confidence, and that will come after time.



It may affect you if you let it. You may have issues if you allow it. I am, as you put it "vertically challenged" also (28" inseam). This is my third bike and I have never dropped or layed any of them down. Front end slide making a U-turn over loose gravel on asphalt, yes. But, never put myself in a bad stop situation. Lowering my bike raised my confidence expotentially without any noticable effect on steering. I do enjoy the twistys and canyons a bit, but I have no intentions of dragging a knee.

It's all up to you,
Randy
I've read actually that a lots of new riders go down on U-Turns or slow speed turns. What is the most common reason for this? Just trying to find out all the info I can before I purchase the bike :)
 

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If I do decide to go this route and lower it, am I going to have any issues with bottoming out or anything? Say if I inevitably have to go over a speed bump or something?
Most I have ever lowered forks (not height related, I was actually changing the geometry on purpose to get more responsive turn in on my N650) was probably 25mm (~1") and I had no problems, but I can see if you used all 4.1" of travel and the tire/fender possibly hitting the Rad or other parts of the bike.
 

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My inseam is 27". My very first motorcycle is an FZ07 which has a 1 inch higher seat, but also I set the preload much higher so the bike doesn't sag when I get on it, hence, its even higher for me.

I learned at the start to just keep one feet down. I never have two feet down at a stop. Plus the very first week I had it, I went and purposely found all the conditions that I needed to get used to. Luckily my neighborhood is quiet, and it has A LOT of steep hills. There is a bunch of houses also down a steep hill. What I did is spent the first day stopping and going on a hill. Stopping right smack on the downhill (that is the hard one). I got used to it. Also cambers, find cambers. Once again, I had no trouble finding cambers in the road. Obviously try to find and practice where it gets steep on the side you put your foot down. Also, be sure to alternate which foot goes down so you will be used to having either feet planted down.

Once I got on the R3, man, oh man, I feel planted! Hahah, I know. Its all relative. That's the problem. I'm sure if your first bike had a higher seat, and THEN you get on the R3, you'll also feel much more confident as well. But I will say my wife is 5'3" and I taught her the one feet down, a year later and its completely natural to her.

Now as far as low speed or u-turns, there is a few things. First, when your steering locks to either side (it turns as far as it can possibly turn) this is a recipe for disaster in low speeds. The bike will just want to fall down. A mistake people make when doing u turns is locking the steering and right away, the bike will probably drop. Don't lock your steering when you do u turns. And this is a sport bike with clip ons. The low speed maneuvering is bad. You will fight the bike to keep it upright. How low the clip ons are, the angle they are placed, the fact that some of your weight is on your wrist. These all contribute to bad low speed handling. Now, relative of course, it is FAR better and forgiving than an R6. But you get on a naked bike, or a cruiser and they are so **** easy to maneuver relative to the R3. Its just the design of the bike. The more aggressive your seat posture, the worse the low speed handling is. The more stable and planted you are at high speeds (sport bikes with fairings), the worse the bike handles at low speeds. The better the bike handles at low speeds, the worse it handles at high speeds. Its just the way it is. Get on a motard or dirt bike, those things you can ride around at 5mph all day like a bicycle, but no way in **** you want to ride 100 mph on it. Its the trade-off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
My inseam is 27". My very first motorcycle is an FZ07 which has a 1 inch higher seat, but also I set the preload much higher so the bike doesn't sag when I get on it, hence, its even higher for me.

I learned at the start to just keep one feet down. I never have two feet down at a stop. Plus the very first week I had it, I went and purposely found all the conditions that I needed to get used to. Luckily my neighborhood is quiet, and it has A LOT of steep hills. There is a bunch of houses also down a steep hill. What I did is spent the first day stopping and going on a hill. Stopping right smack on the downhill (that is the hard one). I got used to it. Also cambers, find cambers. Once again, I had no trouble finding cambers in the road. Obviously try to find and practice where it gets steep on the side you put your foot down. Also, be sure to alternate which foot goes down so you will be used to having either feet planted down.

Once I got on the R3, man, oh man, I feel planted! Hahah, I know. Its all relative. That's the problem. I'm sure if your first bike had a higher seat, and THEN you get on the R3, you'll also feel much more confident as well. But I will say my wife is 5'3" and I taught her the one feet down, a year later and its completely natural to her.
I definitely do plan on going around my neighborhood and trying to immerse myself in situations that I will be in. I know if I can get this down I can conquer one of my biggest fears (oddly) of being able to touch in awkward situations lol
 
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