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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys I was wondering what is THE MAXIMUM drop you can get on the forks? I installed a T-REX Racing Lowering link on my 2015 R3 so naturally my front end should be lowered too. I was wondering is HOW LOW CAN IT GO? According to this video, (SKIP TO 3:30) He said the maximum is 15mm:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BP1QRwzoD4g

But according to this video, He dropped the front 1 Inch. (SKIP to 2:10)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zk6ZqOSfhQc

But this guy Dropped it as much as 45mm: (SKIP TO 0:30)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQK1QTfACiY

So How much is the safest?

After lowering it, how can I stiffen it up?
 

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If you were listening closely to the first video, I would only go the 15mm above the original placement of the handle bars. He points out that going any lower risks hitting the front fender on the frame, or more likely, engine parts.

Oh boy. The other two I wouldn't trust to put gas in my bike. Let alone take suspension advice from.
 

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Forgot to add, to stiffen it up you will need to add preload to the shock and front forks. The shock is easy. Just adjust the preload adjust so the shock spring becomes more compressed. You will need to get preload adjusters, or put in longer spacers to add preload to the stock R3 forks.

If you don't know anything about suspension, I would go to someone who does. Changing the geometry of your bike can drastically change how the bike handles. You should aim for lowering both the front and rear the same amount to attempt to keep the same type of geometry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Forgot to add, to stiffen it up you will need to add preload to the shock and front forks. The shock is easy. Just adjust the preload adjust so the shock spring becomes more compressed. You will need to get preload adjusters, or put in longer spacers to add preload to the stock R3 forks.

If you don't know anything about suspension, I would go to someone who does. Changing the geometry of your bike can drastically change how the bike handles. You should aim for lowering both the front and rear the same amount to attempt to keep the same type of geometry.
As of now, I dropped the front forks 1 inch. But since the front drops too much, I let my mechanic add 100ml of fork oil on the tubes but didn't touch the preload at all, he said we don't need to. Its all stiff now and Doesn't nosedive whenever I tap the front brake unlike stock. But I think It's a little TOO STIFF, maybe he should've just added 70ml? But I definitely prefer too stiff instead of the stock. Stock simply bottoms-out 80% of the time over the littlest brake effort and bump.
 

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What if I don't lower the rear, how low can the front be lowered? If it can even be lowered in the front. I'd be doing it mostly for aesthetics, and I'm willing to relearn the geometrics that would change with lowering.
 

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for racing raising the rear is a recommendation for improved response and handling - I think I remember a post that said somewhere in the vicinity of 7mm (~20 at the subframe). However much you move the front, being **** sure you don't run out of travel and hit hard parts has got to be priority 1.

I can't imagine how so-called aesthetics could be improved but to each his own..

IMO you should have enough air to use up to ~90% of absolute travel. That last little bit is for hitting something hard when under max front weight transfer and to stay out of the fluid lock's final stage as much as possible.

The area of the fork ID is ~1017mm^2 so 10mm worth of oil height is 10170mm^3 which is 10cc. so 100ml of additional oil is a WHOPPING 100mm change in oil height. So yes, he added a ridiculous amount of oil. Fire your mechanic. I would have added at most 20mm worth of oil but sounds like there are other issues at play.

> Stock simply bottoms-out 80% of the time over the littlest brake effort and bump

You have proof of this? How heavy are you? What you describe is not possible if you're sprung properly and sag values are in range. Do you have el-cheapo fork caps that don't seal worth $%^&?

if you want to alter damping characteristics (rate of movement) modify the viscosity of the oil. Oil height is for helping to set the absolute limits of the compression stroke - you're changing the air-spring component.
 
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