Yamaha R3 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Very first bike. Very first time on a motorcycle. I managed to make it almost 50 miles before ****ing it up on a low speed turn.

I was turning right at a stop sign, then I changed my mind mid turn, and started going left. My turn wasn't steep enough, like a fool I tapped the brake, lost speed and it fell.

A) I should have straightened the bike up before braking.
B) I shouldn't have tried to change directions that late into the turn.

Lesson learned, I suppose. I knew going into this adventure that I was going to do something like this. It probably won't be the last time either. Thankfully it was only the tip of the clutch lever, and a chip out of the R3 sticker on the left side where the turn signal smacked into it.

All in, I consider it a win for no instruction at all and having never ridden a bike before. I'm just glad that I'm sticking to deserted neighborhood back roads until my MS class next weekend.

I would like to know if anyone knows of any good one on one instructors or beginner track days around Austin, Texas where I can learn from someone more experienced than myself.

Anyway, figured I'd share my first **** up with the rest of the class.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gizmo

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bend s#!t back in place and keep going. You can only learn by logging miles.
That is what I took away from the whole experience.

As soon as it happened I said to myself out loud "Well ****, that took longer than expected"

I did have a FML moment, because when I stood the bike up, it wouldn't start. Check engine light was on, and I freaked out a little bit. Thankfully pulling the key out and then back in reset whatever oh sh** safety mechanism that was triggered.

I didn't even notice that the end of the clutch lever has snapped off. I rode for another 3-4 hours and my GF finally pointed it out when I got back to the house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
You use your front brake on the low speed turn? You can brake on a low speed turn, just don't use front brakes. I gently coast on the rear brakes.

As a beginner, you shouldn't ever touch those front brakes on anything other than a straight tire full stop. EDIT: I should say in general you want to not touch the front brake unless you are going straight or your wheel is straight. Slowing down on a straight-away you obviously need to use your front brakes (along with your rear brakes).
 
  • Like
Reactions: msdss

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You use your front brake on the low speed turn? You can brake on a low speed turn, just don't use front brakes. I gently coast on the rear brakes.

As a beginner, you shouldn't ever touch those front brakes on anything other than a straight tire full stop.
Thanks for the tip!
I've been using my front brake almost exclusively. Mostly because the back brake is kind of awkward to reach, I have to twist my right foot inward in order for my foot to touch the pedal. I guess it is just something I need to get used to.

I've been trying to avoid braking while turning entirely, but if the rear brake is more forgiving, i'll hopefully have the presence of mind to use it instead of my front.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
Well, what the MSF will teach is to use both brakes at the same time all the time. That's a decent guideline if you can't go into all the variables and such of every situation.

Yes, the front brakes is your main stopping power, but in certain situations, just using the front brakes alone is dangerous.

The MSF won't teach you in-depth nuanced braking procedures so even if you had already taken the class, you may have still run the risk of making that same mistake. Unless the instructor gave his own tips, in general they won't mention anything about NOT using the front brakes on slow speed turning.

A lot of newbies drop the bike from grabbing too much front brakes when their wheel is turned. Coming to a full stop with the wheel turned will also give a high chance of dropping your bike.

When you are more seasoned, you will have an innate knowledge of threshold of how to use the front brakes. I mean, there is this one 45mph downhill curve where I live where I HAVE to brake on the curve because the curve ends on a stop sign (a horrible road for a motorcycle). I dreaded that hill when I first got my bike because I was well aware that I have to brake before the curve, but in that instance, I have no choice but to brake in the curve (and since it is downhill, I have to use the front brake) so I avoided it like the plague. But after I gained experience, going down that hill is no problem because I know how to manage the speed and braking while on the curve.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,515 Posts
THIS is precisely why so many seasoned riders will tell a new rider NOT to buy a brand new bike. Because they know they will drop it at some point in the learning process. But it's okay, just keep going. You will learn. Better to drop a $5k bike, than to send a $15,000 literbike through a guardrail at 100mph because you over-cooked a curve.

You want a "crash course" in what not to do, watch this guys channel. Lots of videos for you to study:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8YmlGN--qU
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
THIS is precisely why so many seasoned riders will tell a new rider NOT to buy a brand new bike. Because they know they will drop it at some point in the learning process. But it's okay, just keep going. You will learn. Better to drop a $5k bike, than to send a $15,000 literbike through a guardrail at 100mph because you over-cooked a curve.

You want a "crash course" in what not to do, watch this guys channel. Lots of videos for you to study:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8YmlGN--qU
Yeah, don't misunderstand, I'm not upset about dropping it. I knew it was going to happen. I don't really care about the damage. I bought this bike because it was a cheap learner bike. I've always wanted a Yamaha, so the other starter bikes just never appealed to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,515 Posts
Yeah, don't misunderstand, I'm not upset about dropping it. I knew it was going to happen. I don't really care about the damage. I bought this bike because it was a cheap learner bike. I've always wanted a Yamaha, so the other starter bikes just never appealed to me.
I know. You are okay. Just fix what breaks, and keep riding! The R3 is the perfect bike to learn on. And it's not just a "learner" bike. I bought it because it was cute and fun! I think it looks cool, and it's comfortable to ride. I'm not a learner, I have been riding for a long time. I'm no expert, but I do okay.
R3 is great for all riders! :nerd:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I know. You are okay. Just fix what breaks, and keep riding! The R3 is the perfect bike to learn on. And it's not just a "learner" bike. I bought it because it was cute and fun! I think it looks cool, and it's comfortable to ride. I'm not a learner, I have been riding for a long time. I'm no expert, but I do okay.
R3 is great for all riders! :nerd:
Good to hear, that is one of the reasons I chose this one over the Ninja and CBR. The only other choice for me was the KTM, but it seemed less forgiving than the R3. I hope to keep this bike for a good long while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
The Snake Mulholland. Ive been watching these videos the last couple of days. Speed is everything. I noticed some not counter steering. Ive ridden this the last couple of days on Mulholland and its a very nice route. Those people are showing off in front of the camera's how too slide your bike into the guard rail. The only safe time to ride this is during the week. The cars going through there take two lanes up on the turns. Not safe at all on the weekend its a zoo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I second the advice to not exclusively use front brake in general use. You want to build the habit of using both - you'll revert to that when under pressure. Then if you need to break from that habit for exceptions, do it. Braking doesn't just affect your speed, but your suspension also. And when your suspension is upset, your traction is upset as well. Tons of low-sides happen from squirrelly weight-transfers across the suspension. You're right: The rear break can be a little awkward at first. But not as bad as eating asphalt. :)

When all else fails - familiarize yourself with Twist of the Wrist II and your head knowledge will expound into your riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Thanks for the tip!
I've been using my front brake almost exclusively.
Yeah watched a chick go over the front of the bike on a front lockup once. Def work on those breaking techniques, lots of accidents by bad breaking habits. balancing brakes, clutch and engine torque.

Glad you are ok, caulk it up as lesson learned. Once you commit, stick to it. Good time to get an adjustable clutch lever :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
I second the advice to not exclusively use front brake in general use. You want to build the habit of using both - you'll revert to that when under pressure. Then if you need to break from that habit for exceptions, do it. Braking doesn't just affect your speed, but your suspension also. And when your suspension is upset, your traction is upset as well. Tons of low-sides happen from squirrelly weight-transfers across the suspension. You're right: The rear break can be a little awkward at first. But not as bad as eating asphalt. :)

When all else fails - familiarize yourself with Twist of the Wrist II and your head knowledge will expound into your riding.
+1. I'm also new to motorcycles and at the very beginning when I was still "thinking" about controls, it's tempting to use front brake only..."one less thing to operate with the foot". But where I live, it's hilly and outside the urban centre, speeds are easily in the 70-100km/h range. The balance is just better when applying both front and rear so I've already gotten the habit of using both instinctively.

But hey, we all make mistakes. Better to make them early and learn from them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
just bend it back and ride, forget about first set of fairing(or use stickers to cover them)
I bent them a few times(left and right) and broke left/right (once or twice) until I have not been dropping the bike anymore for a few months
I even bought an extra pair sitting in bag, let me know if you need one replaced(ordered them but switched mine to shorty levers before they even arrived)

I bought mine new and dropping it left and right, still felt better than buying a R3 and dropping a bike with more expensive parts(almost double of R3, R1 is like triple of the price+)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I got my MSF course done this last weekend and got my license yesterday. The MSF course hammered into my brain to use both brakes at all times, and how to better control them both. It really was a lot of help. I didn't think it was too useful when I was being taught it, but when I started doing it, it really started to feel natural.

Now that I am on my own bike again, and not on that absolutely horrid Kawasaki Eliminator, it feels even better.
@Vince, +1 for the stickers comment. Lucky, my fairings look pretty good after. There is a little nick/hole around the R3 letters, but you can't see it because that part of the sticker was black, and the paint is black, so you can't tell. There is a little white line in the 90 degree bend at the top of the sticker, but I can probably just use a black marker on that, and you won't be able to tell at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I dont understand, how can you be on your first motorcycle ride without a license. I mean if you have a motorcycle license this shouldnt be your first ride!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I dont understand, how can you be on your first motorcycle ride without a license. I mean if you have a motorcycle license this shouldnt be your first ride!
I time travel. It is probably for the best if you don't ask me about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
At least its a motorcycle bro and you are in good health!

TrueStory:
When I was 20 I bought my first 4x4 nissan patrol and fitted it with a snorkeler, and I attempted to water dive with my car on its first week before hitting a rock underwater and having the sunk car towed away the next day, costed 4800 USD where im from to bring back to normal
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
At least its a motorcycle bro and you are in good health!

TrueStory:
When I was 20 I bought my first 4x4 nissan patrol and fitted it with a snorkeler, and I attempted to water dive with my car on its first week before hitting a rock underwater and having the sunk car towed away the next day, costed 4800 USD where im from to bring back to normal
Ouch. That sucks. Yeah, I got away clean and easy with just a clutch lever and a chip off of a decal. Lessons learned! Hehehe
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top