Yamaha R3 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey Everyone,
Really glad to be part of the R3 group and part of the REASONABLE DISPLACEMENT sport bike community in general.
Picked up my R3 from the dealer yesterday and I just can't wait for the snow to clear and the track days to start. There's a few things left to do - replace the engine coolant with water (or alternative? Engine Ice?), remove the licence plate holder/rear fender, remove the mirrors, and I'm pretty much ready to go. I've got Q3+ tires on it already.
My question is whether or not I should get some aftermarket fairing for the bike, because the OEM bodywork seems reasonably priced to replace. I looked at a recent thread, and it looks like a replacement upper fairing was around $46. If you assume that it could cost up to $150 for the front, $150 for each side, and $150 for the tail, that's still less than buying race bodywork, so I don't know why I would bother switching away from OEM. Let me know if I haven't priced this right.
Thanks,
J
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Hey Everyone,
Really glad to be part of the R3 group and part of the REASONABLE DISPLACEMENT sport bike community in general.
Picked up my R3 from the dealer yesterday and I just can't wait for the snow to clear and the track days to start. There's a few things left to do - replace the engine coolant with water (or alternative? Engine Ice?), remove the licence plate holder/rear fender, remove the mirrors, and I'm pretty much ready to go. I've got Q3+ tires on it already.
My question is whether or not I should get some aftermarket fairing for the bike, because the OEM bodywork seems reasonably priced to replace. I looked at a recent thread, and it looks like a replacement upper fairing was around $46. If you assume that it could cost up to $150 for the front, $150 for each side, and $150 for the tail, that's still less than buying race bodywork, so I don't know why I would bother switching away from OEM. Let me know if I haven't priced this right.
Thanks,
J

No.... Your math is correct!!! Especially on the R3- If you're not racing, save your money. Race bodywork in much lighter. When you're racing, every pound counts. If you're doing track days, learning and having FUN counts!!! Take the money that you would spend on bodywork, and invest half that money into proper "crash protection" (I.E. frame sliders, case sliders etc.) Track days are REALLY fun, but racing is a whole other animal-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
No.... Your math is correct!!! Especially on the R3- If you're not racing, save your money. Race bodywork in much lighter. When you're racing, every pound counts. If you're doing track days, learning and having FUN counts!!! Take the money that you would spend on bodywork, and invest half that money into proper "crash protection" (I.E. frame sliders, case sliders etc.) Track days are REALLY fun, but racing is a whole other animal-
Thanks Cornerslider. I ordered the OEM frame sliders that go in the pre-cut out slots on the fairing and put them on already. Wondering what other frame sliders I should add? I think I'll also look for some front axle sliders from TST or R&G if they're available. Interested to hear your suggestions.
Saw an MT-09 at the stealership when I went to pick up the R3....I really think that a used MT-07 would be a great project bike in the future....wish I could have it all at once but.....!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Re engine coolant ... All respectable track day organisations in this area specify "no glycol". That includes normal ethylene glycol and propylene glycol (e.g. Evans). I don't know what formulation Engine Ice is, but if it provides freeze protection and is intended to be mixed at a high percentage (40%-ish or more), it's glycol and therefore a no-go. There was war on a local internet forum about this because someone pointed out that certain other organisations allow it ... and it was also pointed out that the manufacturer of Engine Ice had "bought their way in" by sponsoring the organisation ... Bottom line, water only. Common water pump lubricant and anti-corrosion additives such as WaterWetter or Motul MoCool (which are added in small amounts) are permissible.


Re bodywork ... One thing you should invest in is a set of GB Racing engine covers. They provide an extra layer of protection against your water pump or alternator cover getting punched through in a crash.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Re engine coolant ... All respectable track day organisations in this area specify "no glycol". That includes normal ethylene glycol and propylene glycol (e.g. Evans). I don't know what formulation Engine Ice is, but if it provides freeze protection and is intended to be mixed at a high percentage (40%-ish or more), it's glycol and therefore a no-go. There was war on a local internet forum about this because someone pointed out that certain other organisations allow it ... and it was also pointed out that the manufacturer of Engine Ice had "bought their way in" by sponsoring the organisation ... Bottom line, water only. Common water pump lubricant and anti-corrosion additives such as WaterWetter or Motul MoCool (which are added in small amounts) are permissible.


Re bodywork ... One thing you should invest in is a set of GB Racing engine covers. They provide an extra layer of protection against your water pump or alternator cover getting punched through in a crash.
Thanks. I will look at using water and additives. I've seen the Motul products at the dealers but not the Water Wetter, but will check into it.
I have thought about the engine covers as well, but was worried about heat dissipation. I know that the bike relies on liquid cooling but i thought that extra heat trapped around the cases might lead to higher engine temperatures. Not sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
I have thought about the engine covers as well, but was worried about heat dissipation. I know that the bike relies on liquid cooling but i thought that extra heat trapped around the cases might lead to higher engine temperatures. Not sure.
The cases are designed to keep oil in, not dissipate heat. As GoFaster mentioned, GB makes nice covers, check them out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
The cases are designed to keep oil in, not dissipate heat. As GoFaster mentioned, GB makes nice covers, check them out.
Yes, I took a look. Looks like the existing covers come off and these are added. Will have to ensure torquing bolts to spec on replacement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Actually they bolt on overtop of the existing engine parts. Some of the bolts have to come off (because they will now be used to secure the cover in place) but everything underneath stays put. Very good design. You will see GB Racing covers in use all the way up to World Superbike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,517 Posts
Hey Everyone,
Really glad to be part of the R3 group and part of the REASONABLE DISPLACEMENT sport bike community in general.
Picked up my R3 from the dealer yesterday and I just can't wait for the snow to clear and the track days to start. There's a few things left to do - replace the engine coolant with water (or alternative? Engine Ice?), remove the licence plate holder/rear fender, remove the mirrors, and I'm pretty much ready to go. I've got Q3+ tires on it already.
My question is whether or not I should get some aftermarket fairing for the bike, because the OEM bodywork seems reasonably priced to replace. I looked at a recent thread, and it looks like a replacement upper fairing was around $46. If you assume that it could cost up to $150 for the front, $150 for each side, and $150 for the tail, that's still less than buying race bodywork, so I don't know why I would bother switching away from OEM. Let me know if I haven't priced this right.
Thanks,
J
I would stick with oem until you start racing, if it’s gonna be a track only bike. Less **** to worry about for now.

What size are your Q3+? I always prefer the stock size over a 150/160.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Hey Everyone,
Really glad to be part of the R3 group and part of the REASONABLE DISPLACEMENT sport bike community in general.
Picked up my R3 from the dealer yesterday and I just can't wait for the snow to clear and the track days to start. There's a few things left to do - replace the engine coolant with water (or alternative? Engine Ice?), remove the licence plate holder/rear fender, remove the mirrors, and I'm pretty much ready to go. I've got Q3+ tires on it already.
My question is whether or not I should get some aftermarket fairing for the bike, because the OEM bodywork seems reasonably priced to replace. I looked at a recent thread, and it looks like a replacement upper fairing was around $46. If you assume that it could cost up to $150 for the front, $150 for each side, and $150 for the tail, that's still less than buying race bodywork, so I don't know why I would bother switching away from OEM. Let me know if I haven't priced this right.
Thanks,
J
I would stick with oem until you start racing, if it’s gonna be a track only bike. Less **** to worry about for now.

What size are your Q3+? I always prefer the stock size over a 150/160.
I went with a 150/60 17 in the rear over the stock 140/70. In the front, i stuck with 110/70.

What's your experience with the 150/60's? With the lower aspect ratio, i suspect tip-in is a little slower?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,517 Posts
I went with a 150/60 17 in the rear over the stock 140/70. In the front, i stuck with 110/70.

What's your experience with the 150/60's? With the lower aspect ratio, i suspect tip-in is a little slower?
Slightly slower tip in yes, but I have an ohlins shock and a spare razor, both of which are adjustable. The 150 sits at 90mm sidewall height vs 98 on the 140. I had to raise the ass end a bit.

As for the tire itself, I can’t get to the edge of a 150, even though data from Harry’s lap timer (I know it’s not super accurate) says I’m hitting around the same lean angles. The tire srill has maybe 3-5mm unused tire on either side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
150/60-17 Dunlop Q3 the difference in steering isn't anything worth mentioning. This is a light and quick steering bike either way.
I'm running this tire set up as well, and had the same experience. I bought some race take-offs from a friend that races MotoAmerica. The Dunlop Q3+ is the standard tire in the stock class. It's a great all around tire. (I also run them on the track FZ-07)-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Thanks Cornerslider. I ordered the OEM frame sliders that go in the pre-cut out slots on the fairing and put them on already. Wondering what other frame sliders I should add? I think I'll also look for some front axle sliders from TST or R&G if they're available. Interested to hear your suggestions.
Saw an MT-09 at the stealership when I went to pick up the R3....I really think that a used MT-07 would be a great project bike in the future....wish I could have it all at once but.....!!!
I have yet to find a good frame slider for the 2019 R3. I looked at the OEM Yamaha sliders. I think they are more designed for street riders in case of a tip-over.... I don't think there are truly durable enough for track use. Woodcraft makes the best available (in my opinion). I spoke with Eric Wood, the president of Woodcraft. Unfortunately, the Woodcraft frame sliders do NOT work with the OEM bodywork on the 2019 (they do work with race bodywork). They bolt directly to the frame, but where the front motor mount is, you would have to cut through several pieces of the bodywork- at some very complex angles. I try to stay away from "no-cut" sliders, as they generally don't work very well. I did however, pull the trigger on some Woodcraft axle sliders. These are by far the best design I've ever seen! Really simple, and VERY effective.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
replace the engine coolant with water (or alternative? Engine Ice?),
Can someone explain why you would replace the coolant with water?

I'm guessing it's because you're not going to need anti freeze in a racing environment, and they don't want the possibility of chemical or slip hazards if a crash or leak occurs? A quick Google search didn't really give me an exact answer.

I always thought that coolant also increased the boiling point which would be a benefit for racing, surely? Also, if you replace the coolant with water, do you use distilled water (possibly a dumb question)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Coolant on pavement is extremely slippery. If any of it gets out, either you crash, or riders behind you crash. It is also hard to clean up.

Obviously, oil on pavement is also extremely slippery ... but there's no known alternative for that. There is an easy alternative to using coolant in the cooling system: water!

And yes, water out on the track can cause slipperiness, too ... but it simply evaporates.

De-ionised water plus an anti-corrosion additive (those aren't slippery - they don't contain glycol) is the way to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
I have yet to find a good frame slider for the 2019 R3. I looked at the OEM Yamaha sliders. I think they are more designed for street riders in case of a tip-over.... I don't think there are truly durable enough for track use. Woodcraft makes the best available (in my opinion). I spoke with Eric Wood, the president of Woodcraft. Unfortunately, the Woodcraft frame sliders do NOT work with the OEM bodywork on the 2019 (they do work with race bodywork). They bolt directly to the frame, but where the front motor mount is, you would have to cut through several pieces of the bodywork- at some very complex angles. I try to stay away from "no-cut" sliders, as they generally don't work very well. I did however, pull the trigger on some Woodcraft axle sliders. These are by far the best design I've ever seen! Really simple, and VERY effective.:)
T-Rex Racing makes these:

https://www.t-rex-racing.com/2019-Yamaha-YZF-R3-No-Cut-Frame-Sliders-p/n78-19.htm

I have no experience with them, but have heard really good reports about the quality of the sliders.

I think that these, in conjunction with the OEM sliders, plus front and rear swingarm sliders (both R&G and Woodcraft make them) would probably give you a fighting chance in the event of a non-flipping lowside that doesn't end up on gravel. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
T-Rex Racing makes these:

https://www.t-rex-racing.com/2019-Yamaha-YZF-R3-No-Cut-Frame-Sliders-p/n78-19.htm

I have no experience with them, but have heard really good reports about the quality of the sliders.

I think that these, in conjunction with the OEM sliders, plus front and rear axle sliders (Woodcraft makes them) would probably give you a fighting chance in the event of a non-flipping lowside that doesn't end up on gravel. :D
I have the full T-Rex "protection package" on my FZ-07 (frame sliders, axle sliders, case sliders, rear spools). They make a **** nice product!!!! They offer a "no-cut" frame slider that would be my first choice in a frame slider if I were to track my 2019 R3 with OEM bodywork. Woodcraft make the BEST frame sliders for the pre-2019 models (in my opinion). T-Rex did the best they could with the 2019 bodywork.... They had a tough job too do. Yamaha kind of "hand-cuffed" them with the 2019 bodywork... Frame sliders are most effective when mounted directly to the frame. The OEM bodywork for 2019 isn't very "user friendly" for mounting frame sliders directly to the frame (cutting holes in the bodywork). That being said, I think the T-Rex "no-cut" frame sliders are the best option for tracking a 2019 R3-:) For axle sliders, I can't recommend anything other than Woodcraft- They are the "bee's knee's" :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
538 Posts
Re engine coolant ... All respectable track day organisations in this area specify "no glycol". That includes normal ethylene glycol and propylene glycol (e.g. Evans). I don't know what formulation Engine Ice is, but if it provides freeze protection and is intended to be mixed at a high percentage (40%-ish or more), it's glycol and therefore a no-go. There was war on a local internet forum about this because someone pointed out that certain other organisations allow it ... and it was also pointed out that the manufacturer of Engine Ice had "bought their way in" by sponsoring the organisation ... Bottom line, water only. Common water pump lubricant and anti-corrosion additives such as WaterWetter or Motul MoCool (which are added in small amounts) are permissible.


Re bodywork ... One thing you should invest in is a set of GB Racing engine covers. They provide an extra layer of protection against your water pump or alternator cover getting punched through in a crash.
For the right side is by the Graves carbon cover. I had it on my R3 very trick. Also had the Graves billit left side engine case. Both are superior to the GB product and look much better

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
538 Posts
I have yet to find a good frame slider for the 2019 R3. I looked at the OEM Yamaha sliders. I think they are more designed for street riders in case of a tip-over.... I don't think there are truly durable enough for track use. Woodcraft makes the best available (in my opinion). I spoke with Eric Wood, the president of Woodcraft. Unfortunately, the Woodcraft frame sliders do NOT work with the OEM bodywork on the 2019 (they do work with race bodywork). They bolt directly to the frame, but where the front motor mount is, you would have to cut through several pieces of the bodywork- at some very complex angles. I try to stay away from "no-cut" sliders, as they generally don't work very well. I did however, pull the trigger on some Woodcraft axle sliders. These are by far the best design I've ever seen! Really simple, and VERY effective.:)
Same here, I go with the Graves. Very attractive and they work on the own bodywork without any cutting

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top