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I'm wondering what's going here, too. At 7100 miles, I've averaged a respectable 62mpg. I don't ride, start off, or shift aggressively. So, I'd like to know the same thing. What has to be done to gain +10mpg? Just this side of moving to a flat, uncongested, part of the world, and idle around town at 30mph?
Hypermiling is the new form of street competition. Just as technical and techniqueal as street racing, but safer and greener.

I use basic hypermiling techniques which are better and easier on a motorcycle than a car. The most basic premise of which is that the volumetric efficient of an internal combustion engine is best at wider throttle plate openings to reduce the waste of creating engine vacuum. And at an RPM just below the first torque peak due to cylinder filling efficiencies of cam timing and intake resonance tuning. In actual testing though, via the instantaneous mpg read out, this generally turns out to be the lowest rpm that is not chugging while cruising through town. One of the Craig Vetter "Vertterisms", "It only burns fuel whenever it goes pop". When on the highway this obviously means 6th gear. And I always change to longer gearing with a plus 1, minus 2 on my bikes since I am a highway commuter and long distance tourer.
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Most vehicles have a high power to weight ratio. Even my CBR250R will start going way too fast if I were to use 60% throttle all the time to get the best efficiency so that brings us to the next important hypermiling technique:
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PulseNGlide. This is a technique where you apply a larger than normal throttle opening to gain some speed (pulse), and then pull in the the clutch to coast (glide). Everything they always told you about being steady on the throttle to get the best fuel efficiency was wrong. Riding stop sign to stop sign through town this amounts to just measuring your acceleration for the first half of the block so that you can just coast up to the next street for the second half of the the block.
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Every time you touch the brakes, you just wasted gas. Obviously if there are other vehicles behind you, you have to be polite and keep moving at a normal pace. But I still try to plan it so that I don't have to touch the brakes until I have coasted down to 20 mph.
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My commute is 40 miles each way and 80% highway at 65 mph. I work 11 hours/ day so in Spring and Fall I ride both ways in the dark. And ride 16,000 miles per year. In deer country of the North East USA. So I have developed a strategy to improve my safety. The Interstate is much safer than the back roads since there are no cross streets or driveways. And following is much safer than leading out alone. I always try to chase up to the next big truck and follow along in his right tire track at a normal 2.5 seconds back. I see past him farther with his headlights. And my headlights bonce of the back of his vehicle and light up the road like it was day. His wind blast will keep any large animals from running out in front of me and his bumper and giant tires are a "battering ram" clearing my way and even squeegying the rain out of the track.
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And providing some draft even back at 2.5 seconds which helps the numbers. It also helps to create a pace for the PulseNGlide. Most cars don't stay behind at 65 mph and even if they did, the change in my position of 50 feet at a time is barely noticeable that I am doing it. On a good run I can get to a nearly 1:2 Pulse to Glide ratio on my bikes. Once you get in the habit, it is second nature and almost boring and impossible to stop.
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Aerodynamics of the rider are a big deal on motorcycles. And it is again safer, and better handling, and better visibility in the rain, to lean down on a stuffed tank bag so that you are anchored to the bike and peeking just over the top of a higher windscreen (Which I haven't found one I like for the R3 yet). Kawasaki is killing all other bike makers with the stock adjustability of their windscreens. The aerodynamics are much better and if the the windscreen is in the right place just below the line of sight and within 5-10 inches of your face shield, there is a magic blow dryer effect that causes the rain the to bead straight down off of your face shield for perfect vision even in pouring rain at speeds over 50 mph. And being anchored to the bike allows the front end geometry to magically lean into side winds just the right amount with no rider input. Very addicting supernormal experience to ride on windy days this way. Especially if the road is not too wet to worry about traction. And very relaxing since all of the weight is taken off of your wrists and quite a bit is taken off of your butt. I have done a 1,000 mile day on my CBR250R this way and got 99.5 mpgUS for the trip. Because it is also so much more aero. You become a self correcting dart through rainy wind.
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I also use a long, thin style, luggage platform system made from a plywood sheet, duffel bag, and bungies, that is bolted to a spare passenger seat. Which rides right behind me, out of sight of the wind. Even when stuffed full of all of my camping gear in a 16 by 30" bag, or a can of race fuel as seen here.
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I am over 100 mpgUS on the CBR250R for 60,000 miles, over 80 mpgUS on the R3, and over 70 mpgUS on the new Ninja650.
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http://www.fuelly.com/motorcycle/honda/cbr250r/2011/sendler/78563
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http://www.fuelly.com/motorcycle/yamaha/yzf-r3/2015/sendler/373805
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http://www.fuelly.com/motorcycle/kawasaki/ex650_ninja_650/2018/sendler/940770
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Get the strap on Cortech Super 2.0 tank bag, stuff it full of hoodies or your soft lunch box, and try it for a couple tanks.
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Really nice writeup. Some great ideas on enjoying the commute and saving fuel, and probably tires also.
 

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Some of you will be getting your bikes soon, (lucky!) so once you get a few tankfuls ran thru it post up your mileage.
I'm sure many of us present members and future potential buyers would appreciate this info.
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I have a 2019 R3 with just over 1000 miles on it, it is my daily commuter and my ride to work is mostly highway. I am getting 57 to 58 MPG using regular unleaded.
 

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Finally went through a Tank.
My results are:

  • 169 Miles
  • 2.8 Gallons
  • = 60.35MPG
My MPG Gauge on the bike read 57.
So pretty accurate.
Also my Empty Indicator was going off for about 20miles before I fueled up.
Gas Gauge is alittle inaccurate!!! Should be able to go over 220miles on one tank No Problem.
My indicator was also on the last blinking notch around 140 miles. I just kept driving to 210.1 miles before stopping to fill up. It took 3.5 gallons, meaning:

210/3.5= 60mpg, roughly equivalent to the 58.8 avg calculated by the onboard estimator.

3.9 gallon tank means I had .5 left and presumably 30 miles to go before empty. Meaning 240 miles to a tank.

previously, I filled up at a similar point to above (around 150-170 miles) due to the blinking indicator. I will be ignoring this from now on and using my usual method of zeroing out the trip odometer and filling up between 220-235 mile mark.
 

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My R3 often varies 2-4 mpg average per tank full, depending on how full I got the fuel tank last fill-up, and 'hard' I'm pushing the bike. Yamaha lists the tank size as 14 liter or 3.7 gallons. You can figure in and depend on that 'reserve quantity' of 0.2 gallon if you like. But, to always expect 56+ mpg and ignore the fuel gauge is being really optimistic. I'd suggest caring along a comfortable pair of walking shoes, because soon or later.. you're going to need them. ;)
 

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We here in India follow the Km scale, My R3 gives around 20-22km/L of fuel in city usage, bumper to bumper traffic, needing 30-45 mins to cover 12 kms, and goes upto 28-30km/L on the open highway stretches, when keeping between 80-120kmph..
Mine is also a daily commuter and has done 20k kms upto now.

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This is pretty interesting to me. I've never gone past the blinking fuel bar to fill it up. But I've never put in more than about 11 litres of fuel - meaning I still had about 3 litres in the tank! I suppose if I didn't have a fuel gauge I would just keep going till I hit around 300 kms on the tank but I just can't get past the flashing bar, makes me a bit nervous, lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #288 ·
Good to see more posts here. Anybody see any noticeable difference between the 2 generations? More aerodynamics ya know... 😉
 

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This is pretty interesting to me. I've never gone past the blinking fuel bar to fill it up. But I've never put in more than about 11 litres of fuel - meaning I still had about 3 litres in the tank! I suppose if I didn't have a fuel gauge I would just keep going till I hit around 300 kms on the tank but I just can't get past the flashing bar, makes me a bit nervous, lol
Very similar experience with me too, within city 200kms is my cutoff and on the highways 300kms is the cutoff, irrespective of going into fuel reserve mode, don’t wanna run the fuel pump dry and risk damage..


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Good to see more posts here. Anybody see any noticeable difference between the 2 generations? More aerodynamics ya know... 😉
Nah man, the new fairings don't offer anything noticeable in terms of fuel savings I typically get around 300 Km average on 11 liters of fuel on either fairing. The main aerodynamic issue that needs to be resolved is the rider, but I don't think you want to be in a full tuck all the time😅
 

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Discussion Starter · #291 ·
Nah man, the new fairings don't offer anything noticeable in terms of fuel savings I typically get around 300 Km average on 11 liters of fuel on either fairing. The main aerodynamic issue that needs to be resolved is the rider, but I don't think you want to be in a full tuck all the time😅
Good to know. I will be looking for a 2019 blue R3 next season.
 

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Nah man, the new fairings don't offer anything noticeable in terms of fuel savings I typically get around 300 Km average on 11 liters of fuel on either fairing. The main aerodynamic issue that needs to be resolved is the rider, but I don't think you want to be in a full tuck all the time
I've noticed a significant difference between my 2015 and my 2020 R3s. The 2015 bike averaged 26 km/l whereas the 2020 bike is averaging 29.5 km/l for the same commute. I'm not sure why, but it is a considerable difference.

Maybe Covid-19 has made the traffic lighter.

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I've noticed a significant difference between my 2015 and my 2020 R3s. The 2015 bike averaged 26 km/l whereas the 2020 bike is averaging 29.5 km/l for the same commute. I'm not sure why, but it is a considerable difference.

Maybe Covid-19 has made the traffic lighter.

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On my first gen i average about 50 mph.
 

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2017 R3 mpg report:

210 miles, 3.5 gallons = 60 mpg
On board estimator says 57.9mpg

<Edit> : I weigh 175lb + 25lb gear = 200lb.

I have been through several tanks now (a little over 2k miles since I bought it second hand), seems pretty par for the course. My "Empty warning" flasher comes on the last bar, and I've found it usually resets itself the first couple times, then I estimate I have about one gallon left. Estimating 60mpg with 4 gallons in the tank gives me 240 miles, so I set my "no go" fueling up point at 220 and so far end up very comfortably under the mark. (as in the above example, where I still had 1/2 gallon or 25-30 miles left in the tank at 210). I notice a lot of folks are nervous and fill up under 200 miles, but I trust the math and I'm hardly ever more than 20 miles from a gas station so I feel comfortable going over.

In 2k miles of riding, that's 10 fill ups vs. 13 @ 150 miles. I prefer less unnecessary time at the pump.
 

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When I first got my R3 and before 1000 miles, I was doing 60 MPG per the on board info
After 1000 miles, I'm doing 57 MPG

This is mainly because I magically got a heavy foot.... wait I mean a heavy right hand lol
 

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When I first got my R3 and before 1000 miles, I was doing 60 MPG per the on board info
After 1000 miles, I'm doing 57 MPG

This is mainly because I magically got a heavy foot.... wait I mean a heavy right hand lol
Same. I was like why is my avg mpg down? The throttle hand tends to get heavier as you learn the bike.
 

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My R3 often varies 2-4 mpg average per tank full, depending on how full I got the fuel tank last fill-up, and 'hard' I'm pushing the bike. Yamaha lists the tank size as 14 liter or 3.7 gallons. You can figure in and depend on that 'reserve quantity' of 0.2 gallon if you like. But, to always expect 56+ mpg and ignore the fuel gauge is being really optimistic. I'd suggest caring along a comfortable pair of walking shoes, because soon or later.. you're going to need them. ;)
I religiously calculate the mpg I get on every tank whenever I fill up. After over 20 years of motorcycles as my primary transportation, and one incident of running out of fuel on a lonely stretch in UT (short of the station by ≈ 2 miles), I have come to trust the math. Whatever footwear I have on at the time will be fine, if I have another miscalculation in the next 20 years.

For now, another update: On the last flashing bar of fuel, got 55 miles on the “F Trip” odometer and 214 on the tank trip odo, and a full up of 3.8 gallons. That’s 55mpg, and I’m hypothesizing the F:trip and flashing bar starts at ≈ 1 gallon left in the tank.
 

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I religiously calculate the mpg I get on every tank whenever I fill up. After over 20 years of motorcycles as my primary transportation, and one incident of running out of fuel on a lonely stretch in UT (short of the station by ≈ 2 miles), I have come to trust the math. Whatever footwear I have on at the time will be fine, if I have another miscalculation in the next 20 years.

For now, another update: On the last flashing bar of fuel, got 55 miles on the “F Trip” odometer and 214 on the tank trip odo, and a full up of 3.8 gallons. That’s 55mpg, and I’m hypothesizing the F:trip and flashing bar starts at ≈ 1 gallon left in the tank.
Great stats..so 55mi after the flashing bar? Oof. My pb is 5mi after bar flash start.
 

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Great stats..so 55mi after the flashing bar? Oof. My pb is 5mi after bar flash start.
“Pb”? “Personal best”?
55.5 mi is what showed in the F Trip odometer, which automatics comes on at the flashing last bar. I’ve also experienced the F Trip will get triggered and start to count, but then usually it resets after a few miles and doesn’t get triggered again for 3-10 miles. I suppose that is from fuel sloshing around in the tank.

Side note re: fuel octane type: I thought Isaw somewhere in the manual to use 89 (midgrade) so that’s what I put in usually.
 
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