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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. I've started throwing my bike around. I did the fork oil and serviced the forks. but the rear still squats way too much. I have too much sag. at max preload. im not concerned with ohlins this and that. id like to just throw a 20% stiffer spring in. just to get the rear to stop pivoting on the swing arm and get both ends working
anyone know the stock spring specs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have deleted cat and muffler and thus freed up about 7-10 kilos. which has helped the rake. ill stick to this for now as its more on the front end
when I ride the bike B4 if I looked in a reflective surface the bike was sitting flat no rake at all. now it sits a few MM higher which helps get the front down a bit more.
 

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I'm not sure what constitutes as too much sag in your case but I'm 220lbs with preload set to 5 and I think it's perfect, I haven't had issues yet, bike seems to handle great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
it might be riding style or anything bro. its my first bike. but what I can say is. the front feels like it was lifting even lent over with steady throttle. if I cracked it open the front would wash BAD. that was at preload 4. and me sitting at the back of the seat. leant right over in a tuck. if you have to hit 5 on the preload you are better off getting a stiffer spring.
 

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You do realize the bikes capacity is able to go up much more than that, stiffer spring isn't always better more importantly the spring ratio to valving is more critical for suspension handling. Anyway, it's designed to sit at a preload and I'm well below the bikes max carrying capacity :) preload just gets the geometry dialed in correctly for the weight you're riding with, if it's still within adjustment, it's fine.

This is my first bike too, but I can say that never happens to me so you may have something weird going on, have you checked to make sure the shock isn't blown? Keep in mind your shock is actually what's suspending your weight too. Likewise I'd start with the basics, what are your tire pressures at? I'd recommend taking a video of the issue to see how bad it is, anytime you accelerate in a vehicle quickly the weight will always shift backwards ALWAYS it will never be flat unless it's got ridiculously stiff suspension or very little power, it's how weight transfers in vehicles. So it's not abnormal to hear that unless it's really really bad. Have you had a buddy who rides look at it and ride it to see if they notice anything off?

Being at 220lbs I can put my weight as rearward as possible, lean backwards and gun it in 1st and it doesn't feel like the front is lifting, you either have something very wrong going on from your description or it's not lifting that much :).
 

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it might be riding style or anything bro. its my first bike. but what I can say is. the front feels like it was lifting even lent over with steady throttle. if I cracked it open the front would wash BAD. that was at preload 4. and me sitting at the back of the seat. leant right over in a tuck. if you have to hit 5 on the preload you are better off getting a stiffer spring.
First, you need to get weight on the front of the bike. By being on the rear, and it sounds like this is happening when you are in a turn, you are taking weight off the front and this will cause a loss of traction. I have my forks about 25 mm above the triple so I can get more weight on the front. I also sit right up on the tank to get weight on the front. I know if you put to much weight on the rear you can spin up the rear tire and low side, if lucky, or high side if you are unlucky. I got lucky and low sided.

Second, it doesn't sound like a suspension issue. It may be that you are pushing the front tire without it having either proper pressure or heat in it. Of course, the tires on the R3 are notoriously bad.
 

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Capitalview hit exactly what I was saying :)

The only way that could be a suspension issue was if the shock was completely non functional. At least to the degree of the OPs complaint.

I still think the issue is exaggerated I'm 25% heavier and can't get the bike to behave like that when trying on purpose...
 

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Hey guys. I've started throwing my bike around. I did the fork oil and serviced the forks. but the rear still squats way too much. I have too much sag. at max preload. im not concerned with ohlins this and that. id like to just throw a 20% stiffer spring in. just to get the rear to stop pivoting on the swing arm and get both ends working
anyone know the stock spring specs?
jbk,

Short of taking out the shock to measure you can try this. Go to Home Depot or Lowe's to the hardware section and get a thin nylon washer with an ID less than your shock shaft. Cut the washer and use a needle nose pliers to hold the washer opposite side of the cut and slip the washer onto the shock shaft. Now, you can push the washer up against the shock body and sit on the bike, then dismount to see how much of the shock travel you are using. Its like using a zip tie on the front fork. You can also use this to see how much of the full range you are using after a ride.

Now if you want to use this method to try and estimate the spring rate, then push the washer up, then sit on the bike and check how far it moved. Then reset and use a much heavier weight (You plus 50 lbs) then check how much the washer moved. The difference between measured distance is related to the 50 lbs, so 50 lbs/0.25" difference (made up distance) = ~ 200 lbs/in.

If you are trying to verify sag, You need a way to lift the bike up, reset washer, then let down. Then lift up, that should give you the bike sag. Done once, you should know the amount the bike compresses the washer down, From that point, you can check it and add the bike sag distance to give you the rider sag. If the shock has a 2" working range, you should be using less than 0.50" via the washer check method.

Hope this helped.
Jerry
 

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Another R3 site had this posted:

Shock is 275mm stock and 900# spring.

http://forums.13x.com/index.php?threads/yamaha-r3-whats-your-set-up-for-this-bike.329732/

and that poster went with a stiffer spring.

The R3 has a direct shock swingarm to frame mount with small leverage for the shock vs rear axle. No wonder the spring is so stout - but maybe not stout enough. I have a Honda Hawk GT in the fleet; it also has a direct shock mount. For my 180 lbs, I use a 1,500 lb/in spring on a Nitro shock. the stock was about a 1,100 lb/in spring.

I think I will get a R3, perhaps this year, so I'll troll for now and try to get to 10 posts...
 

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yes, but I see you cannot get a washer on the rear shock. I bought a used R3 shock on ebay - see attach pic. The R3 shocks are dirt cheap, so I could do some initial testing before a bike purchase. I have the tooling to test the shock out and will post back the results so you know the spring rate, etc.

I would be interested to find a willing R3 rider in the Baltimore, MD area that would be willing to be part of the shock checkout/baseline effort - Any takers? PM me or post here. It just involves swapping shocks, checking sag numbers and riding/recording certain values. Come back after a week or so of riding and swap shocks back. That will give enough data to baseline the shock for all R3 riders.

I'll modify the R3 shock so you can see the nylon washer like I did for an other bike/shock so you can record the data after riding the R3.


Its pretty easy to do and very revealing.

Jerry
 

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it might be riding style or anything bro. its my first bike. but what I can say is. the front feels like it was lifting even lent over with steady throttle. if I cracked it open the front would wash BAD. that was at preload 4. and me sitting at the back of the seat. leant right over in a tuck. if you have to hit 5 on the preload you are better off getting a stiffer spring.
I would suggest that jbk is noob rider who is of the mindset that harder, non-compliant suspension is somehow sporty.

We will probably get a crash post from jbk about how the R3 is a dangerous and unstable bike after he punts it into a ditch at some time in the future.
 

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i would suggest that jbk is noob rider who is of the mindset that harder, non-compliant suspension is somehow sporty.

We will probably get a crash post from jbk about how the r3 is a dangerous and unstable bike after he punts it into a ditch at some time in the future.

raw.gif
 

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Ive actually never measured how much trwvel I am using on my shock but have done the zip tie method many times on different bikes. Why can't you use a zip tie on a shock?
In theory, you could but there are 2 reasons the washer has worked better.

1. It is hard to snug up a ziptie on the smaller diameter shaft; the washer hugs it very well and stays in the last place it is pushed.
2. The rear shock uses up its entire range (or very close) so you want whatever you use to take up the least space. Here the washer is flat and thin. The ziptie, no matter how small is thicker. On the fork, you have lots of room above the max compressed fork to the zip tie to not interfere with anything.

But there is nothing to say you cannot give it a try....
 
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