Yamaha R3 Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

I'm from Houston, Texas.
I have 1 year of experience of watching Motovlogs on youtube. :D I even had dreams about riding a bike. I finally took my MSF course last week. Holy sh*t dropped the bike 3 times during the course. Twice, I forgot to straighten the wheel when I stopped, and bike just fell. And the worst one was during the stopping exercise, I was going ~20 mph and slammed on the front and rear brakes all the way and I fell off the bike. I still have cuts and bruises from the MSF course.

Anyways, I got my license and bought my Yamaha R3 (BLUE) 2 days ago. I was stalling in the dealership parking lot and there was a big street I had to go on. I was panicking like a bitch, went around the parking lot 5 times to practice. And rode it home going 25 mph on a 45 mph zone. I was sh*t scared but at the same time was super exhilarating. Now I rode my first 30 miles around the local streets! Man, I am ready to fight the streets!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Congrats. The bike doesn't have reverse nor should your brain when it comes to dropping the bike. Try not to dwell on it to much.Concentrate on the future and ride carefully.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Good to hear you saved your drops for the bike provided by the MSF.
You bought a great bike, many of us have had bigger bikes and bought the R3 since its really just plain fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
I don't mean to be too negative but this is exactly why I believe the american procedure to get a motorcycle is way to simple and should be made harder or exactly like the uk/european system, you can literally just go do some basic course and still get through even after dropping a bike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Hi guys,

I'm from Houston, Texas.
I have 1 year of experience of watching Motovlogs on youtube. :D I even had dreams about riding a bike. I finally took my MSF course last week. Holy sh*t dropped the bike 3 times during the course. Twice, I forgot to straighten the wheel when I stopped, and bike just fell. And the worst one was during the stopping exercise, I was going ~20 mph and slammed on the front and rear brakes all the way and I fell off the bike. I still have cuts and bruises from the MSF course.

Anyways, I got my license and bought my Yamaha R3 (BLUE) 2 days ago. I was stalling in the dealership parking lot and there was a big street I had to go on. I was panicking like a bitch, went around the parking lot 5 times to practice. And rode it home going 25 mph on a 45 mph zone. I was sh*t scared but at the same time was super exhilarating. Now I rode my first 30 miles around the local streets! Man, I am ready to fight the streets!
Congrats on your new bike and new endeavour, however, as a new rider, and from the description of your experience, I would suggest that you seriously consider getting some more coaching before venturing out into the streets with your shiny new R3.

You are likely in a hurry to enjoy the thrills of motorcycling, but you it does seem like you need a bit more instruction or more practice (proper use of brakes is of the utmost importance) before you go and "fight the streets", which really is an appropriate phrase for riding in busy traffic.

I'm not discouraging you from riding; I am encouraging you to take some steps so that you can enjoy your two wheels for a long time.

Oh, and don't forget to get some protective motorcycle clothing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Imowlin, first of all your description of the MSF experienceis dead-on. I too, dropped the MSF bike (June4, 2015) while doing the counter-steering exercise in the rain; touched thefront break and boom. I must say, Irolled to my feet picked-up the bike and joined back in with the exercise.

I keep a journal (you could call it a lesson-plan) of all myrides, thus far. This is how I track myprogress and note concerns. I have usedthe word, “Exhilarating” in almost every entry, because that’s the only way todescribe the FEELING. I talk to myself alot during my rides, it’s hilarious.

This forum is great; the members are super-helpful andalways there to impart vital knowledge on new riders like us.

Enjoy and Ride Safe!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thank you for the encouragement all! I am glad I had my experiences during MSF course, because I wouldn't know what front wheel locking means if I've never experienced it. I honestly tried to push myself in the MSF course, such as leaning just alittle bit more than my comfort zone while countersteering, braking hard to simulate real life scenarios (therefore fell off the bike), etc. I wanted the instructor to tell me if my techniques were incorrect and so forth.

Everyday I'm trying new techniques, downshifting and throttle blipping, and just feeling out the bike. This forum is great because I learned so much already. As mentioned in the forum, I tried squeezing the clutch with two fingers only to where the clutch hits my pinky finger. This helped my shift become smoother. Also read some articles of throttle blipping etc.

I am super excited. I consider myself a careful rider. I am 34 and am not interested in lane splitting, racing, and taking risks. I just like the freedom I have when riding my bike.

Thank you all!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
I don't mean to be too negative but this is exactly why I believe the american procedure to get a motorcycle is way to simple and should be made harder or exactly like the uk/european system, you can literally just go do some basic course and still get through even after dropping a bike
Here in Florida, dropping the bike only once means you automatically fail the class.
Keep it to low speed streets for the time being. Make sure you're strapped and fully clothed in the right gear. Make sure to look (quickly glance) over your shoulder when making turns, or shifting lanes.
And last but not least, not to scare you from riding, but youtube motorcycle accidents and crashes. 90% of the time on those youtube vids, the rider of the bike was either responsible for the crash, or could have done something better to avoid it.
Aside from entertainment, try to learn from their mistakes. That way you don't have to by experience.

Most of these mistakes are lanesharing, speeding, overly fast trying to surpass a car, not looking, and claiming right of way (when they really could have just slowed down, and scooted over to avoid a collision )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
I don't mean to be too negative but this is exactly why I believe the american procedure to get a motorcycle is way to simple and should be made harder or exactly like the uk/european system, you can literally just go do some basic course and still get through even after dropping a bike
I know what you mean! In Canada you have 16 hours closed circuit + 10 hours road. In the courses you go through acceleration, braking, hard turns, slow riding (under 5kmph), slaloms, gates, hard braking straight and in a turn, figure 8, countersteering and maybe more. All of this is done on different bikes from 125cc up to 650cc in the last courses. Plus if you fail a class you repeat.

After all of that theres no way your bike feels unnatural. Theres always more to learn but you start off with the most basic skills already acquired.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
I agree that in the US, it is too lenient, especially when everyone is different in their learning curves.

I believe my wife had no business passing her MSF course, and there were worse students than her, yet the whole class passed. My wife has logged in 400 miles on the R3 now and she still has no business riding the streets. Ignoring the fact that she dropped her bike 4 times now, I saved her ass from getting run over twice. I ride behind her, we are on Sena bluetooths and twice I had to shout at her to brake. Once taking a right on an intersection, she thought the people who were turning left were turning left, but they were doing a U-turn right into her and she would've collided into them. The other time a guy ran a red and my wife was starting to go on the green and I told her to stop as the guy zoomed right by.

If I wasn't behind her watching out for her, she would've got into an accident no doubt. Its quite obvious she also has tunnel vision. Yeesh.

She is a slow learner when it comes to motorcycles. Some people just are. I was more of a natural. I took to it instantly. Everyone is different when they learn how to ride a motorcycle. MSF courses are great for quick and natural learners, but they are just a baby step for slower learners.

TC, take your time. Build up the miles. Don't do anything crazy. Learn at a pace that is in line with your skills. And congrats.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,264 Posts
I agree that in the US, it is too lenient, especially when everyone is different in their learning curves.

I believe my wife had no business passing her MSF course, and there were worse students than her, yet the whole class passed. My wife has logged in 400 miles on the R3 now and she still has no business riding the streets. Ignoring the fact that she dropped her bike 4 times now, I saved her ass from getting run over twice. I ride behind her, we are on Sena bluetooths and twice I had to shout at her to brake. Once taking a right on an intersection, she thought the people who were turning left were turning left, but they were doing a U-turn right into her and she would've collided into them. The other time a guy ran a red and my wife was starting to go on the green and I told her to stop as the guy zoomed right by.

If I wasn't behind her watching out for her, she would've got into an accident no doubt. Its quite obvious she also has tunnel vision. Yeesh.

She is a slow learner when it comes to motorcycles. Some people just are. I was more of a natural. I took to it instantly. Everyone is different when they learn how to ride a motorcycle. MSF courses are great for quick and natural learners, but they are just a baby step for slower learners.

TC, take your time. Build up the miles. Don't do anything crazy. Learn at a pace that is in line with your skills. And congrats.
I hope your wife improves quickly in her situational awareness and riding skills! I guess time in the saddle will tell. Good thing you have those Sena systems!

That's gotta be some kind of nerve-wracking, stressful for you.

I had a GF once that got her Learner's Permit, was working on street skills, dropped the bike from hitting the front brake coming out of a driveway, and would never get back on a bike after that, even on the back of mine! At least your wife is keeping at it. Props to her!

Has she watched any of these videos? It's not really all advanced skills; just stayin' alive stuff!

http://www.r3-forums.com/forum/618-...some-great-videos-advanced-safety-skills.html
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top