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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I woke up super early to call Berkeley Yamaha (the place i bought my bike from) about the recall for our bikes and after being tossed around 3 different departments, a guy finally answers me and asks me what i want. Previous guy from parts told me i need to give them my VIN to run to check if my bike is on the list (why? I already stated i received a recall for MY bike).

Told the guy on the phone i was told to give him my vin to run a check and he gives me an attitude saying "we dont need that, when do u want to come in?" I proceed to tell him i can only come in on saturdays and told him i heard it only takes 2hrs to get it done and he tells me "no it doesnt take 2hrs u drop it off and u pick it up in the afternoon i cant tell u when the job gets done" ok fair enough i say.. But i tell him i work graveyards so it will be hard to come in that early and he proceeds to raise his voice at me stating "what do YOU want to do then?" I tell him i will just try to come in when they open and he doesnt even ask me what make or model my bike is or why i called lol (i was transferred to him). All he says was "good see u then." Crazy how rude this dealership is now that im not buying a bike but trying to get **** fixed. Makes me wonder if they even have the parts for my bike to fix.
 

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So I woke up super early to call Berkeley Yamaha (the place i bought my bike from) about the recall for our bikes and after being tossed around 3 different departments, a guy finally answers me and asks me what i want. Previous guy from parts told me i need to give them my VIN to run to check if my bike is on the list (why? I already stated i received a recall for MY bike).

Told the guy on the phone i was told to give him my vin to run a check and he gives me an attitude saying "we dont need that, when do u want to come in?" I proceed to tell him i can only come in on saturdays and told him i heard it only takes 2hrs to get it done and he tells me "no it doesnt take 2hrs u drop it off and u pick it up in the afternoon i cant tell u when the job gets done" ok fair enough i say.. But i tell him i work graveyards so it will be hard to come in that early and he proceeds to raise his voice at me stating "what do YOU want to do then?" I tell him i will just try to come in when they open and he doesnt even ask me what make or model my bike is or why i called lol (i was transferred to him). All he says was "good see u then." Crazy how rude this dealership is now that im not buying a bike but trying to get **** fixed. Makes me wonder if they even have the parts for my bike to fix.
So funnily enough I just got my recall letter in the mail yesterday and was about to call these guys up since they're the closest Yamaha dealership near me, but I guess I'll have to rethink that plan haha.
 

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Don't call them on the phone and demand sh1t. Nobody likes it when customers do that.
Go down there in person, and talk face-to-face with the service guys. Take your recall letter with you, if you have it.
If you don't have your letter yet, print-out the recall notice from the Yamaha website, and write your VIN number and contact info on it.
Have something in your hand to SHOW them. ASK them when they will have your recall parts kit in-stock, and when they would like
you to drop your bike off. ASK them how long they would like to have the bike for. A couple of days maybe? A week?
Don't demand sh1t, and expect them to work around YOUR life. They are fixing it for FREE, and you are not their only customer.
I ran a shop for years, and nobody who runs a shop appreciates a$$hole customers. You work with them, and they will try to work with you.
It's a two-way street. And if you are in the USA.... don't expect a LOANER BIKE.
In the USA, a motorcycle is not a "necessary transportation" vehicle. In the USA, a "motorcycle" is a RECREATIONAL / SPORT vehicle.
You should have a car, or truck, or some other means of transpo. Most people in the USA do not have a "motorcycle" as their only means
of transportation. If the dealer offers you a LOANER bike while your R3 is in the shop getting the recall done, consider it a rare GIFT.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Don't call them on the phone and demand sh1t. Nobody likes it when customers do that.
Go down there in person, and talk face-to-face with the service guys. Take your recall letter with you, if you have it.
If you don't have your letter yet, print-out the recall notice from the Yamaha website, and write your VIN number and contact info on it.
Have something in your hand to SHOW them. ASK them when they will have your recall parts kit in-stock, and when they would like
you to drop your bike off. ASK them how long they would like to have the bike for. A couple of days maybe? A week?
Don't demand sh1t, and expect them to work around YOUR life. They are fixing it for FREE, and you are not their only customer.
I ran a shop for years, and nobody who runs a shop appreciates a$$hole customers. You work with them, and they will try to work with you.
It's a two-way street. And if you are in the USA.... don't expect a LOANER BIKE.
In the USA, a motorcycle is not a "necessary transportation" vehicle. In the USA, a "motorcycle" is a RECREATIONAL / SPORT vehicle.
You should have a car, or truck, or some other means of transpo. Most people in the USA do not have a "motorcycle" as their only means
of transportation. If the dealer offers you a LOANER bike while your R3 is in the shop getting the recall done, consider it a rare GIFT.
I wasnt demanding anything. I was simply calling to request an appointment for my recall and at no point was I rude to them. It sounded like the rep who was talking to me woke up on the wrong side of the bed or something. He barely let me finish my sentences and constantly gave me attitude, but yet a few months ago when i was trying to purchase the bike they sounded oh so nice.. go figure. And I dont have the convenience to just walk into the dealership because the nearest one is 20 miles from me and is across the bay, which costs toll too. Not to mention I work graveyards so its hard to wake up when they are open in the first place.
 

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CBRpilot I did not realize I had to kiss the dealers arse to get a manufacturing defect corrected. A recall is a manufactures problem, you should be able to call the dealer and give him your vin and he should be able to tell you if it required. It did not look like the author of this thread demanded anything, Hobbez I would just ignore Cbrpilots remarks.
 

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Oh the inconvenience!!!
all that time on the phone and possibly a day without your bike
(My dealer is 500km away, trailering it there, 3 days away... no big deal, my engine is important for the next 30 yrs)


You're not exactly making things any easier.
and still you want them to work on a hot engine.... on a weekend.


Life isn't a race.
 

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Part of a dealers job is customer service. That is doing what they can to make the customer happy. Hands down, this is sh1tty customer service. The dealer I am going to, which I didn't even buy my bike from, called me back, apologized for not getting back to me quicker. Then went on to state once they get the parts in they can have it done in the same day.

While we may not be paying the dealers for this service, Yamaha is. It isn't like the dealer isn't getting paid for doing this work. I would be especially pissed if I bought the bike from them. They should do whatever is in their power to get the job done for me so I keep coming back.
 

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With the caveat that there are 2 sides to every story, the conversation Hobbez posted doesn't paint a picture of an unreasonable customer, but rather a lack of hospitality from the dealership. I hope I'm not alone in thinking it's still perfectly reasonable in today's society to use the telephone to square away logistics (e.g. confirming the recall, confirming the new parts are in stock, confirming a date/time that works for both parties) before visiting the dealership in person. While some people may have alternative modes of transportation that can trailer a motorcycle and can afford to take multiple days off to do so, should we assume everyone else in the world has the same luxuries?

Shifting gears here, the majority of manufacturer dealerships in the States (including this one in Berkeley), have completely federated departments, so it's not surprising you were transferred and may have had to repeat yourself or answer seemingly obvious questions based on what you said to the last person. The person from the service department isn't going to give one hoot about how nice the person from sales was when you bought your bike.
 

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My bike is a Berkekey Honda Yamaha getting the recall done. I bought my bike from them and have had nothing but excellent, professional from their sales and service staff.

CJ
 

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CBRpilot I did not realize I had to kiss the dealers arse to get a manufacturing defect corrected.
You know how much I hate dealerships.
I never suggest kissing their a$$ for anything. Your words, not mine.
 

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but yet a few months ago when i was trying to purchase the bike they sounded oh so nice.. go figure.
Never confuse the "sales staff" with the "service department".
Two totally different worlds.
The sales department is there to play mind games and get you to purchase a new motorcycle.
They are typically formally trained in psychology. ( The art of the sale )

Mechanics are grumpy people by nature. Most of them don't give a crap about manners or trying to be polite.
They cuss, use tobacco products, and usually drink beer. Most are poor. They do what they do, because they couldn't imagine life behind a desk wearing a Polo shirt and dress slacks. In the shop, they can be themselves. It's a pirates life for thee. This is why so many dealerships don't allow customers to even step foot in the service department. The shop is usually messy. Hazards everywhere. Oil on the floor, extension cords running everywhere, loose tools on the floor, parts on the floor, drain pans on the floor. Shops are rarely if EVER climate-controlled. In the summer, it's hot and miserable. In the winter, it's like an ice box. Engines running, fumes everywhere, people running air tools and grinders, noise levels high. Dudes yelling across the shop cussing at each other. Sparks from welders flying around. Low pay, terrible working conditions. Rarely any positive recognition for a job well done. ALWAYS an a$$ chewing when something goes south.

If you haven't lived it..... don't criticize it.
 

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As a guy who runs the warehouses in several retail stores, I approve of cbr's post. I've got enough to do without dealing with customers, I want to be done with it as quickly as possible so I can get back to work.

Keeping customers happy is for the sales staff and management, not the back of the house. I won't go out my way to be a dick, but I'm not going to sweet talk anyone either.
 

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As a guy who runs the warehouses in several retail stores, I approve of cbr's post. I've got enough to do without dealing with customers, I want to be done with it as quickly as possible so I can get back to work.

Keeping customers happy is for the sales staff and management, not the back of the house. I won't go out my way to be a dick, but I'm not going to sweet talk anyone either.


Until you're the customer and you ain't happy!
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Never confuse the "sales staff" with the "service department".
Two totally different worlds.
The sales department is there to play mind games and get you to purchase a new motorcycle.
They are typically formally trained in psychology. ( The art of the sale )

Mechanics are grumpy people by nature. Most of them don't give a crap about manners or trying to be polite.
They cuss, use tobacco products, and usually drink beer. Most are poor. They do what they do, because they couldn't imagine life behind a desk wearing a Polo shirt and dress slacks. In the shop, they can be themselves. It's a pirates life for thee. This is why so many dealerships don't allow customers to even step foot in the service department. The shop is usually messy. Hazards everywhere. Oil on the floor, extension cords running everywhere, loose tools on the floor, parts on the floor, drain pans on the floor. Shops are rarely if EVER climate-controlled. In the summer, it's hot and miserable. In the winter, it's like an ice box. Engines running, fumes everywhere, people running air tools and grinders, noise levels high. Dudes yelling across the shop cussing at each other. Sparks from welders flying around. Low pay, terrible working conditions. Rarely any positive recognition for a job well done. ALWAYS an a$$ chewing when something goes south.

If you haven't lived it..... don't criticize it.
See this is where you misread it all. The service department relayed my phone call BACK to a sales rep whom I had to speak to in order to get an appointment to bring my bike in. I had no issues with the service department, which only said "We need your VIN to check if your bike is on the recall, let me transfer you" (btw, which was what I noted to the first guy I spoke to, stating I had received a recall on my bike". I dont know what everyone's issue is with how I handled the situation. I simply asked for an appointment for my recall to get done and told them my availability. What am I supposed to say? "Yes im available on all days of the week" when it isnt true? Like I stated before, I work graveyards and can only get this work done on the weekend. In NO time during the conversation did I tell them "I NEED IT DONE ASAP" I simply asked when they are free to get it done. How in the world is this my fault now? So anytime a customer who receives a recall notice calls the dealership in which they bought their vehicle tries to get an appointment in, we are the ones at fault? Alrighty then.. I guess im guilty if thats the case lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Oh the inconvenience!!!
all that time on the phone and possibly a day without your bike
(My dealer is 500km away, trailering it there, 3 days away... no big deal, my engine is important for the next 30 yrs)


You're not exactly making things any easier.
and still you want them to work on a hot engine.... on a weekend.


Life isn't a race.
Not too sure what your problem is, but there is no need for your sarcasm here. In no time during the conversation did I call for anyone's head and show any sort of urgency regarding the recall fix. This thread is about how rude the sales rep was to me on the phone despite me just requesting an appointment and telling them when I am available to come in. Never did i state to them that I needed it done as fast as possible nor was I rude to them in any way. So Im not makings any easier simply by requesting to come in to fix my recall? Ok.. sure.
 

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And this right here is why my bikes will never go to a dealership or any other shop. I've worked in a shop. And I came to realize the people who own or work in a shop get so disconnected from the mission - fixing bikes and making the customer satisfied. It is like eventually people who work or run a shop feel they're doing you a favor by working on your bike. I don't care if it is a recall or regular service work... it shouldn't f'in matter. You're there to support the crappy bikes you sell .. or you're there to fix bikes in exchange for hard earned cash. Shop is hot? Get over it. Customer doesn't want to drop the bike off for 1 hours work? Deal with it. Any other service industry would die if they acted like motorcycle people hahahah

I stay far away from shops, even with my cars. There is only one thing that can get my cars in a shop: Tires - and I sure ain't gonna drop it off for that. Motorcycles never go to the shop and I change my own tires on those.

Just my personal opinion on the matter.

The very notion that they're doing you a favor by doing safety recall work on a bike they sold you... borderline hilarious.


Don't call them on the phone and demand sh1t. Nobody likes it when customers do that.
Go down there in person, and talk face-to-face with the service guys. Take your recall letter with you, if you have it.
If you don't have your letter yet, print-out the recall notice from the Yamaha website, and write your VIN number and contact info on it.
Have something in your hand to SHOW them. ASK them when they will have your recall parts kit in-stock, and when they would like
you to drop your bike off. ASK them how long they would like to have the bike for. A couple of days maybe? A week?
Don't demand sh1t, and expect them to work around YOUR life. They are fixing it for FREE, and you are not their only customer.
I ran a shop for years, and nobody who runs a shop appreciates a$$hole customers. You work with them, and they will try to work with you.
It's a two-way street. And if you are in the USA.... don't expect a LOANER BIKE.
In the USA, a motorcycle is not a "necessary transportation" vehicle. In the USA, a "motorcycle" is a RECREATIONAL / SPORT vehicle.
You should have a car, or truck, or some other means of transpo. Most people in the USA do not have a "motorcycle" as their only means
of transportation. If the dealer offers you a LOANER bike while your R3 is in the shop getting the recall done, consider it a rare GIFT.
 

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So I woke up super early to call Berkeley Yamaha (the place i bought my bike from) about the recall for our bikes and after being tossed around 3 different departments......
Id just be happy if the dealer I bought mine from would even answer the phone/return a message/reply to an email.

Over a 2 week span Ive left 2 voice mails and 2 emails with the service department and when you call no one answers the phone in service.

Needless to say I booked it in at a different dealer that had me setup in one phone call.

Never confuse the "sales staff" with the "service department".
Two totally different worlds.
Although your 100% correct on the majority of all service shops, customers in the majority of times never deal directly with mechanics, they deal with service writers.

Its a service writers job to be a customer service rep and sell you on their service, regardless if your paying or its warranty work. They are basically salespeople. If they're giving you any kind of grief its very easy to take your request to another business, just like if you were unhappy with a salesperson selling you a new bike you can go to another dealer and get better representation by the dealer.

In most dealerships its the service/parts departments revenue that keeps the lights on and bills paid and new unit sales are the gravy.... dealerships that struggle is because they provide terrible customer service on the service/parts side.
 

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As a guy who runs the warehouses in several retail stores, I approve of cbr's post. I've got enough to do without dealing with customers, I want to be done with it as quickly as possible so I can get back to work.

Keeping customers happy is for the sales staff and management, not the back of the house. I won't go out my way to be a dick, but I'm not going to sweet talk anyone either.
No offense, but who do you think gives you the work to do..... customers.

And service workers wonder why they're always at the bottom of the totem pole in any business.... its because the majority have this exact attitude.

They have no concept of the fact as to what actually generates revenue in a business. The attitude of 'thats not my job to provide customer service' is exactly why service workers will always be treated they way they are and paid accordingly.

At my dealership we have mechanics that are requested by customers time and time again to work on their equipment specifically because of the fact they are personable and provide the time of day to the customer if they have a question regarding the work that was performed. Because of this, it generates repeat business.
 

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To play devil's advocate, service depts deal with unhappy people in a hurry with busted vehicles all day. It's not an excuse, but you gotta appreciate the crap they put up with continuously. It takes a certain type to not get beat down and become reactive.
 
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