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2016 Yamaha YZF-R3
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I really enjoy your posts on this forum. I'm not at all trying to start an online argument.... I'm just trying to understand? Maybe "I don't know, what I don't know?" I've looked at the above diagrams, and it doesn't make sense to me??? It seems to me that if you "lower" the the length of the upper tubes (and still don't raise the fork tubes in the triples), aren't you still effectively changing the angle of the steering head, and modifying the geometry of the bike? I seems (to me) that your method of lowering the front end, would give the front suspension less travel, and still modify the OEM steering geometry? Please help me understand what I may not know??? Thank you in advance :cool: -
Raising the forks in the triple will change geometry, this won't (as long as rear is lowered the same). Just like cars though, you also need to re-spring not just for your weight, but to account for the lowering.
 

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2016 Yamaha YZF-R3
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108 Posts
Exactly, you have to counter with stiffer spring rates, and progressive springs are a bad idea when lowering. On cars, it's a different story, but on bikes the risk of bottoming becomes a hazard, and over stiff springs negatively affect riding in different ways. I'm short, and I get it, it sucks at first that you can't touch the ground with ease. Like everything though, it just takes practice and getting used to. Better to learn how to ride with correct geometry and spring rates than to learn bad habits.
 

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2016 Yamaha YZF-R3
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Most new riders and even street riders in general want to put both of their feet down, which is where they get the idea to lower their bike. I only put one foot down, but I put my right foot down at stops. I don't use the rear brake at all, and I'd much rather be able to shift into neutral at stops, and shift quickly into 1st. However, I don't really ride the street anymore either, so I'm not stopping except to come back into my pit.
 

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2016 Yamaha YZF-R3
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@GoFaster I think best explains what I've found over the years also as a roadracer, and explains it well. Personally, I've seen more riders who lowered their bikes stop riding because they crashed often while trying to get faster, due to the adverse affects. Like GoFaster, my R3 sits higher than stock for racing, and I'm short. I put one foot down at stops and it's been that way since it was still street legal.

Take away from his write up is about what I want to convey, especially if you're hitting the track, it's better to learn to ride with stock or higher, especially on the R3.
 
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