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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Turn signals flop around like crazy. Aftermarket ones a necessity, IMO.

Manual says "avoid prolonged operation above 7,000 rpm for first 600 miles". NOT "do not go above 7,000 rpm" I set my shift light at 8,400 rpm and will shift at that point sometimes, not always. After 600 miles I'll move the shift light setting up to 9,500 rpm.

Yamaha really "cheaped out" on the grips and levers. Aftermarket ones a necessity, IMO.

The mirrors are useless. You can see your elbows only! No adjustment fixes this. You have to pull your elbow in to see vehicles directly behind you.

I tried to adjust the rear shock pre-load to make the suspension firmer with the included tool. It's way too short to get any leverage on it. Wouldn't budge , at least when trying COMPRESS the spring. Need a longer tool or a pipe to put over the toll kit one. Or, in my case, just push/pull harder, apparently!

The build quality on mine is WAY better than on the 2012 CBR250R I had. CBR250R also had fairing buzzing and the engine had top end valve train clatter (this was common with these bikes).

The graphics on the bike are not clear-coated over, so you can remove any or all of them easily.

A tank protector is needed on the rear of the plastic tank because the seating position puts you very close to it and jackets/zippers will rub.

NOTE: Xyzzy has posted more observations in the Introduction thread.............
 

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I never wear anything with a zipper...well pants I guess, but that zipper isn't exposed. It's a valid point though cause they do put zippers on a lot of bike wear including most riding jackets and riding jeans. I always turn my buckle one loop over to the left. In fact I always wear the belt that way so I don't forget. I am satisfied with the build quality too for an entry-level bike. Fairings fit properly and it's a very good looking bike fit and finish wise. It's not as comfortable as I would have liked. It's my least comfortable bike to ride by far but I prefer the naked bike riding position. I'm not sure its much different from the Ninja 300. The Ninja 300 engine is tried and true and always sounded very solid. My R3 has this resonance in 3rd and 4th gear and when I idle there is something that is not knocking, but almost knocking if that makes sense. Probably nothing, but time will tell if the R3 is as solid as the Ninja 300 engine. I still only have 350 miles on it though, so I need some more time to get a good feel for it. I bet eventually those turn signals will fall off if you don't replace them. Then you won't have to worry about them any more. LOL. Mirrors don't show much for sure, especially directly behind you. Knowing this, I have mine adjusted so I can see someone just to the back and either side of me. I wonder how those Bug Eyes helmet mirrors work?
 

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I adjusted my wife's preload down. My only experience is with 2 Yamaha bikes, and they are both essentially the same on two different bikes.

Wear leather gloves in case the tool slips- and it will slip down the road, and apply steady pressure, and it will slowly move. Even if you just moved a halfway or even less, it will stay that way, it doesn't "reset". So then you are free to continue to move the tool some more until you get the notch in.

So the tool isn't too short, it works, you just need to get used to it and also realize you can move it a bit at a time. You try to turn it as far as space allows you, then you remove the tool and choose a higher tooth so you can move it some more. Trust me, its not bad when you get used to how to do it.

And dude, I'm a 115 lb Japanese guy. If I can do it, I'm sure anyone can do it.

As far as the graphics goes, yeah my wife wants me to remove some, if not all of them. But I'm hesitant since the Raven has red wheel "rim tape" and if I remove all the red off the body, it might look weird. So I might just remove the back 320 stickers.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I adjusted my wife's preload down. My only experience is with 2 Yamaha bikes, and they are both essentially the same on two different bikes.

Wear leather gloves in case the tool slips- and it will slip down the road, and apply steady pressure, and it will slowly move. Even if you just moved a halfway or even less, it will stay that way, it doesn't "reset". So then you are free to continue to move the tool some more until you get the notch in.

So the tool isn't too short, it works, you just need to get used to it and also realize you can move it a bit at a time. You try to turn it as far as space allows you, then you remove the tool and choose a higher tooth so you can move it some more. Trust me, its not bad when you get used to how to do it.

And dude, I'm a 115 lb Japanese guy. If I can do it, I'm sure anyone can do it.

As far as the graphics goes, yeah my wife wants me to remove some, if not all of them. But I'm hesitant since the Raven has red wheel "rim tape" and if I remove all the red off the body, it might look weird. So I might just remove the back 320 stickers.
I can move it down, but not up. That shock spring is pretty hefty and doesn't want to compress easily.
 

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On my bikes, I always unload the rear suspension before I try to adjust the tension firmer into the travel. Unload your rear suspension by getting the rear wheel OFF the ground. Your knuckles, and your rear shock threads, will thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
On my bikes, I always unload the rear suspension before I try to adjust the tension firmer into the travel. Unload your rear suspension by getting the rear wheel OFF the ground. Your knuckles, and your rear shock threads, will thank you.
Great idea. I have a motorcycle floor lift that I can put it up on.
 
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