Yamaha R3 Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Im no mechanic. Im wanted to order a front and rear sprocket for my bike. don't know how to tell how many teeth I need or should have on the front and rear. I just do street riding and occasional day at a track. so nothing crazy. link to what i was looking at.

Driven 520 Chain and Sprocket Kit Yamaha YZF-R3 15-20

tips and suggestions walcome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Yamaha R3’s stock chain sprocket size is 14T front, 43T rear, 112links 520 pitch, and sticking to company ratios are recommended as long as you are not a hardcore track rider, or a tourer.. only thing is the oem chain is O-ring based but try to go with better X-ring ones, they are better and last longer..


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Your options are:
-Stock gearing with decent acceleration and top speed
-Gear for top speed at the expense of acceleration
-Gear for acceleration at the expense of top speed

Unless you are using the moto for track duty exclusively, where you spend the vast majority of your time at high RPM, you are likely best staying with the stock gearing and instead spend your money on stickier tires or lightweight sprockets and/or hardware. Either will have a larger impact on the handling and perceived power of the bike while maintaining its versatility.

Check out this link for additional info regarding how different gearing schemes will effect your top speed and acceleration. Gearing Commander ⚙
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I'm a little late to this thread (just joined the forum), but I'm currently working out what gearing to run on my new R3 (I just made a post about this, actually). There are a lot of factors involved, but for me, the main goal is to reduce average cruising-speed engine RPM by as much as possible without losing the ability to pull that speed up hills. The idea is to theoretically increase the long term durability of the motor by a bit.

If you happen to have similar goals or interests regarding gearing, then here is a brief summary of my thinking on it thus far; these are potentially some of my options (pending my further testing of how well this motor will pull the bike up steeper highways):

1) Gear tall enough to make fifth gear the same or even a little taller (lower engine RPM at a given speed) than the stock sixth gear. This would be something like 15/40, 16/42, or even 16/40. In this case, one would need to use fifth gear to go up hills, and sixth gear for flats, where sixth gear would be VERY tall (thus considerably reducing engine RPM on flat or downhill highway).

2) Gear just slightly taller so that sixth gear is just a little taller than stock, and use sixth gear all the time still (including going up steeper hills). This assumes the engine would still pull a bit taller gearing in sixth gear. Probably 15/43...

3) Leave it bone stock (if sixth won't pull or struggles a lot up the steepest highways -- again, pending further testing...) and live with 8,600 RPM all the time.


Keep in mind that gearing changes will alter the accuracy of the speedometer (although going up to a 15 tooth front will likely make it almost dead-on accurate, whereas stock is probably not quite accurate -- pending further testing...since I can't seem to find much of the info I need online). I'll be sure and post results of my testing and whatever gearing I end up choosing, including possible recalibration of the speedometer and/or tachometer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Once again, my concern with going with taller gearing is that you're essentially destroying any usability for 1st gear. As it sits, oftentimes i will pull away from a stop in 2nd gear if im not in a hurry and feeling to lazy to shift down to 1st. I can only imagine how useless it would be with a ratio change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Once again, my concern with going with taller gearing is that you're essentially destroying any usability for 1st gear. As it sits, oftentimes i will pull away from a stop in 2nd gear if im not in a hurry and feeling to lazy to shift down to 1st. I can only imagine how useless it would be with a ratio change.
Well, with the changes I'm talking about here (above), first gear would actually be much MORE "useful" (as you are using the term here) -- i.e. with the gearing changes I'm working on, the "new" first gear will be a little more like the current/stock second gear (i.e. it will be "taller"): the bike will tend to stay in first gear longer with this taller gearing (probably 16/42) compared to the stock first gear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Sorry, my brain was thinking backwards. It not very often people gear for top speed, usually its more for low-end torque. Gearing for slower acceleration for the benefit of top end is pretty rare i think (except in racing?). But yes, you're right, lower revs at top speed with slower acceleration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Sorry, my brain was thinking backwards. It not very often people gear for top speed, usually its more for low-end torque. Gearing for slower acceleration for the benefit of top end is pretty rare i think (except in racing?). But yes, you're right, lower revs at top speed with slower acceleration.
Hey no worries haha.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top