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Discussion Starter #1
To those who own an R3 and other types of motorcycles such as cruisers or naked bikes. Maybe even other sport bikes.

Does the R3's slow speed turning feel very heavy compared to your other motorcycles? If so, is this just the trait of a sport bike?

I own a FZ07 and when going slow (around 5mph/10kph range) and turning, steering is fine. Won't give it another thought. When I get on the R3 and do the same maneuvers, it feels real bad. Heavy. Like the steering wants to keep turning the direction I turn it and eventually the bike will drop unless I use more force to keep the steering where I want it. Basically what I mean is if I turn the wheel slightly right while going slow, the bike wants to keep turning the wheel even more right on its own and doesn't stay in place.

Do you feel this as well compared to your other bikes or do I have some alignment issues going on? But then it happens on either side I turn the wheel on. Is this a normal trait for sport bike orientations? I've ridden cruisers and different naked bikes and never felt this until I rode the R3. This is my first time riding a sport bike.
 

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For me, the steering seems actually quite good. I'm used to sport bikes, though. Turns quickly and predictably. I believe you are merely feeling the difference of a steeper steering angle.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
See the problem I'm having is, it isn't hard to turn, it just wants to keep turning at low speed, so I have to fight it from turning anymore than I need it to turn. Like it is biased on one side, except it happens on both sides.

So either I'm spoiled with the FZ07's handling or there is something wrong with the steering or something. I'll just have my brother in law look it over (he works for the Yamaha dealership where I picked up the R3).
 

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In a slow speed turn, it is natural for the handlebars to want to turn into the turn, this is just a matter of physics.
There is too much tire resistance (opposing force) in the road compared to the slow speed, along with the lean in the turn (weight of the front fork/bars), the front wheel will naturally turn in.
Take a regular bicycle for instance, when you push it slow (ie from the seat) without holding the bars, and lean the bike over, the handlebars will automatically turn into the turn.

The difference that you're feeling on the FZ09 is that the handlebars are much wider, so you have a lot more leverage to stop the bars from turning in.

I went from a supermotard to this sport bike and I felt the difference as well, but it's normal.
 

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Good post liquis.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
In a slow speed turn, it is natural for the handlebars to want to turn into the turn, this is just a matter of physics.
There is too much tire resistance (opposing force) in the road compared to the slow speed, along with the lean in the turn (weight of the front fork/bars), the front wheel will naturally turn in.
Take a regular bicycle for instance, when you push it slow (ie from the seat) without holding the bars, and lean the bike over, the handlebars will automatically turn into the turn.

The difference that you're feeling on the FZ09 is that the handlebars are much wider, so you have a lot more leverage to stop the bars from turning in.

I went from a supermotard to this sport bike and I felt the difference as well, but it's normal.
Alright, thanks for that. Just what I wanted to hear.

That sucks, I will probably have to trade in the R3 when the FZ03 is released down the road since my wife is too weak to consistently fight the turning forces at low speed which is what I'm going to blame for her dropping her R3 four times now when she does a turn from a stop.
 

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That sucks, I will probably have to trade in the R3 when the FZ03 is released down the road since my wife is too weak to consistently fight the turning forces at low speed which is what I'm going to blame for her dropping her R3 four times now when she does a turn from a stop.
She should be counterbalancing with her weight in slow speed turns, this is so that the bike is not leaning too much. Too much lean, and then the front fork/wheel will naturally turn, then the weight of the bike can cause her to drop.

In slow maneuvering, also can maintain a higher rpm, use the friction zone and rear brake. With engine rpm higher, the bike will want to fight against the lean. It is the gyroscopic effect.
 

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She should be counterbalancing with her weight in slow speed turns, this is so that the bike is not leaning too much. Too much lean, and then the front fork/wheel will naturally turn, then the weight of the bike can cause her to drop.

In slow maneuvering, also can maintain a higher rpm, use the friction zone and rear brake. With engine rpm higher, the bike will want to fight against the lean. It is the gyroscopic effect.
Agreed. Most new riders always forget counter balance and throttle / clutch work. Said lady in question is probably not on the gas and slipping the clutch in her turn (no power to wheel equals gravity effect [falls]). Also I've notice some people get into a low speed turn and when they think the bike is going to drop, they instinctively straighten the handlebars. This only induces more drop as the bike is in a lean. If she is making a left, and she feels this dropping affect, you must turn harder left to bring the bike back to an upright position (with more gas or more properly, letting off the clutch more as the gas should already be on).
Lollingthunder , take your wife to a parking lot and teach her figure-eights. This will dramatically help with her practice. Though there are differences between bike, height, power, weight, etc...they do all work the same way. Even going to a bicycle won't change science :)
 

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I second what liquis said about "dragging" the rear brake while performing low speed maneuvers. You'll be amazed at how it helps to balance the bike. Stay on the throttle gently and gently drag the rear brake. I think with proper technique she'll get better and come to truly love her bike.
 

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Also, the R3 is probably more top heavy. It has a small engine, and is taller than most other small bikes, so, yes, it has more weight on top than small bikes, and more percentage of weight on top (higher point of gravity) than bigger bikes, where a full fuel tank makes less of the overall weight of the bike.

Try seeing if it makes a difference if the tank is full or empty.
 
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