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For those using aftermarket bodywork or clip-ons, you may find that the controls conflict with bodywork or instrument cluster. One way to address this issue is to modify the steering stops to limit left or right steering limits. NOT RECOMMENDED FOR STREET USE!! - done poorly, you may weaken steering stops or create unsafe conditions. Do not attempt if you do not have the skills to do this. First photo - steering stops.
- remove bodywork and IC/Fairing mount to provide access to stops.
- centerpunch, drill and tap lower triple tree stops. (M6 x 1.0).
- thread in bolt with jam nut, adjust as required. Second photo shows jam nut on back side of stop - I moved it to front side of stop to work better.
- once completed, steering limits can be adjusted with bodywork and IC installed. Be sure and tighten jam nut and use liberal amounts of Loctite.
 

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There's also this gizmo - not adjustable, but looks like it will provide about the same reduction in steering limits, without having to drill or tap (mounts to steering tube stop): http://japan.webike.net/products/21846754.html
Has anyone tried this part? If you ask me, you're better off buying the Graves one made for the R3 than trying this piece. Looks to be about the same price.

With that said, this is a great write-up! I'm debating whether this route is better than the Graves pre-made piece. Has anyone else gone this route?
 

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I'm wondering how needed it really is? I've never done this on any other bike. I imagine it simply limits the amount you can turn the handlebars, which will make it a PITA to maneuver the bike in my garage or in the pits. While you're on the track you're never going to turn the handlebars much anyway, so I'm not sure I really understand the purpose of this. Is it just so when you do turn the handle bars a lot (off the track) it stops you from hitting the brake lever or brake reservoir against the fairing?
 

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I'm wondering how needed it really is? I've never done this on any other bike. I imagine it simply limits the amount you can turn the handlebars, which will make it a PITA to maneuver the bike in my garage or in the pits. While you're on the track you're never going to turn the handlebars much anyway, so I'm not sure I really understand the purpose of this. Is it just so when you do turn the handle bars a lot (off the track) it stops you from hitting the brake lever or brake reservoir against the fairing?
I had them on my 250 last year and will definitely look to have some form of stop again this year. Yes, it mainly eliminates the possibility of things hitting bodywork when they shouldn't be. I see it as a safety precaution. Does hinder maneuverability, but these bikes are light enough you can just pick the whole rear end off the ground if you need to.

If you've had nasty tank slappers in the past, you can bet steering stops will be your best friend then too. ;)
 

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I had them on my 250 last year and will definitely look to have some form of stop again this year. Yes, it mainly eliminates the possibility of things hitting bodywork when they shouldn't be. I see it as a safety precaution. Does hinder maneuverability, but these bikes are light enough you can just pick the whole rear end off the ground if you need to.

If you've had nasty tank slappers in the past, you can bet steering stops will be your best friend then too. ;)
Hmm....funny you mention that....that's basically how I crashed in september on the 500, sort of lol

I would think steering stabilizers work much better at keeping the bike in check when you get a tank slapper, than hard stops.
 
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I had them on my 250 last year and will definitely look to have some form of stop again this year. Yes, it mainly eliminates the possibility of things hitting bodywork when they shouldn't be. I see it as a safety precaution. Does hinder maneuverability, but these bikes are light enough you can just pick the whole rear end off the ground if you need to.

If you've had nasty tank slappers in the past, you can bet steering stops will be your best friend then too.
Hmm....funny you mention that....that's basically how I crashed in september on the 500, sort of lol

I would think steering stabilizers work much better at keeping the bike in check when you get a tank slapper, than hard stops.
Definitely true there. A $400+ stabilizer is definitely going to do more for ya. But if a quick DIY job or $25 can help too, it's a pretty easy choice, in my mind.
 
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