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Discussion Starter #1
600 miles service Dealershi or DIY

I am almost at the 600 miles and I was wondering who is doing it themselves and who is paying the dealer. I am tempted to take it to the dealer to help with any warranty issues. Does it void your warranty to do it yourself? I did buy the extended warranty so I don't want them to try an not cover a repair. I have spent enough money that I would rather do it myself.

Anybody who has had theirs done at the dealer what did they charge you?
 

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The first service is often the most important service for a bike because it's the first service at the midpoint of break-in. It is recommended that you bring it to your dealer because they do more than an oil change. They check everything. It might be expensive though.
 

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If you read the Owners Manual you'll see that they don't really do much at all beyond the oil and filter change at the 600 mile service. Check for play in controls and bearings, make sure switches work, check for damage to hoses, etc.

But, you'd still be shocked at how much they will charge you! It seems like most dealerships charge at least $70.00 per hour these days.

I know a local service manager who says to just do all the routine maintenance yourself and only have the dealership do the required valve adjustments. For the R3, that isn't until 26,600 miles.

Modern bikes are so well engineered and built that it's quite possible that the valves will still be within tolerances even at that mileage.

The manual calls for a fuel injection synchronization periodically starting at 4,000 miles but he says they only ever have to do that on very high mileage bikes.

All the rest is easy to do if you're mechanically inclined at all. If you're not, and can afford the cost, take it to the dealer for piece of mind.

I've owned 37 motorcycles over the last 48 years and I've never had any repairs needed on any of them, so never had a warranty claim.

I've done all the maintenance myself (including oil and filter changes; brake fluid, coolant, chain and brake pad replacement, etc.). The only exception was valve adjustments and tire mount & balance. I let the dealer do those. I DO have a couple friends that even do those things, too.
 

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I've never taken a bike back to a dealer for any service, but I like working on things. Have I made a mess of things or destroyed parts in the process? Yep! But that is part of the learning process. Some people are not willing to invest the time to learn how to work on motorcycles. I have no interest in cooking so I don't unless I have to. If your reason for working on your own bike is to save money, you may save some, but bikes today, especially bikes designed for "emerging markets" are designed to take a lot of abuse. I'm not saying you should abuse them of course, but think about how many of these bikes will never ever be serviced at all. Also, I like to do my own work is because it is relaxing and because I know I will take more care than someone who is just punching a clock. I like the idea that I could do most simple repairs on the road if needed. It is my opinion that if you need to have your bike worked on you would be best served by finding a competent local "generic" mechanic and pay him well. These bikes do not require any special computerized equipment to work on them. A DVM is about as high tech a tool you will need and every good mechanic has one. The 600 mile checkup is a good chance for you to "get to know" your new friend, the R3. Maybe find someone on the forum who lives close to you to show you the ropes? I am always willing to help but I live in the middle of nowhere. Being part of the "motorcycle culture" is understanding your bike and passing that knowledge on to fellow motorcyclists. Motorcycling is one of the last frontiers where someone can be totally self-sufficient, which I think is real cool! I'm rambling here and I doubt you have read this far so I'll stop.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm plenty capable to do the basic maintenance. I am by no means highly skilled but I get by a lot more then most. My most concern was the warranty. My dog has 2 bad ACLs so it's going to be pretty bill with surgery so I'm trying to save where I can. I may take to my buddies who has been riding longer then I've been alive. I trust myself more then a mechanic that doesn't have the love that I do for the bike.
 

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How much did the extended warranty cost?

I would be tempted to cancel it and get my money back if I was in your position. (The dealer might say you can't cancel it but most times you can. Read the fine print on the contract.)

If the bike is going to fail it is most likely going to fail during the OEM warranty. Extended warranties, to me, only make sense in certain circumstances, like crazy-expensive electronics.

The extended warranty is more of an insurance policy. The dealer wouldn't sell it if he (or the warranty company) lost money!

If you do keep it I hope it is a "genuine Yamaha" extended warranty and not a generic one.

Call me jaded, but after buying 21 motorcycles and countless cars and trucks, I don't buy *anything* from the dealer except for the bike.
 

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How much did the extended warranty cost?

Call me jaded, but after buying 21 motorcycles and countless cars and trucks, I don't buy *anything* from the dealer except for the bike.
Me either. Good experience too to do the oil change yourself, few Allen bolts, drain pan, new filter, correct oil and quantity, disposed of correctly.
 

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How much did the extended warranty cost?

I would be tempted to cancel it and get my money back if I was in your position. (The dealer might say you can't cancel it but most times you can. Read the fine print on the contract.)

If the bike is going to fail it is most likely going to fail during the OEM warranty. Extended warranties, to me, only make sense in certain circumstances, like crazy-expensive electronics.

The extended warranty is more of an insurance policy. The dealer wouldn't sell it if he (or the warranty company) lost money!

If you do keep it I hope it is a "genuine Yamaha" extended warranty and not a generic one.

Call me jaded, but after buying 21 motorcycles and countless cars and trucks, I don't buy *anything* from the dealer except for the bike.
I forget exactly but it was around $350. It is yamaha genuine and I can get my money back whenever I want if I choose so. I just felt like it would make me more comfortable riding around knowing I had it. I plan to always keep this bike as a good fun thing to throw, back up or commuter.
 

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I forget exactly but it was around $350.
If you have a *good* dealer it might be worth it, but from what I have seen, a lot of dealers have (bogus) ways of making money off of extended warranty repairs. $350 would buy a lot of tools…

I don't buy the insurance at Best Buy either. I like living on the edge! (LOL)
 

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If you have a *good* dealer it might be worth it, but from what I have seen, a lot of dealers have (bogus) ways of making money off of extended warranty repairs. $350 would buy a lot of tools…

I don't buy the insurance at Best Buy either. I like living on the edge! (LOL)
Edge Living Rocks! :cool:
 

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That extended warrenty is worth it for one good reason. If you blow the motor up even if its your fault it gets fixed for free no questions asked. So its worth it for you track guys like me who plan to race the R3
 

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If you blow the motor up even if its your fault it gets fixed for free no questions asked.
One of the cars I had ate a crankshaft bearing a few years ago with only 12,000 miles on the odometer. The engine was filled with metal bits and stuff. The dealer was "on my side" but had a *lot* of difficulty convincing the manufacturer to authorize the repair under the factory warranty. With the economy being what it is, I think both dealers and manufacturers might ask a few questions. YMMV.
 

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That extended warrenty is worth it for one good reason. If you blow the motor up even if its your fault it gets fixed for free no questions asked. So its worth it for you track guys like me who plan to race the R3
Pretty much every warranty, factory or otherwise, will be voided if you race the bike competitively. Check the fine print...

Dealership service departments are savvy enough to tell if you've raced the bike. Things like lights and mirrors removed, quick shifter added, cylinder head decked, racing sponsor stickers all over it, full aftermarket exhaust (this voids the warranty immediately where slip-ons don't), etc.

Ask your service manager. I'm sure he has many stories he could tell you.

Plus, a download of the bikes ECU would reveal everything.
 

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My local dealer only charged me $120 for a 600 mile service on my R6, I cant imagine the r3 would cost any more. For warranty purposes, id just take it to the dealer for the first service. Regular warranty is a year, so after that you can just do the basic stuff yourself.
 

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Oil changes on motorcycles more often than not are so easy to do its ridiculous. Personally I would take it in at 4k service (or whichever it is around that mark) that recommends throttle body. But as far as 600 miles go, I did that on my own on my other motorcycle. If you have a torque wrench and stand, tightening the chain isn't that big a deal either.
 

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Do it yourself, you can train a Chimp to change oil on most bikes...just save your oil & Filter receipts.

I let my dealer know from the get-go...he told me the same thing, I can my own oil, and he can do the other ancillary BS that's needed.
 

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Pretty much every warranty, factory or otherwise, will be voided if you race the bike competitively. Check the fine print...

Dealership service departments are savvy enough to tell if you've raced the bike. Things like lights and mirrors removed, quick shifter added, cylinder head decked, racing sponsor stickers all over it, full aftermarket exhaust (this voids the warranty immediately where slip-ons don't), etc.

Ask your service manager. I'm sure he has many stories he could tell you.

Plus, a download of the bikes ECU would reveal everything.
Did you see the photos of my bike? No stickers no qucik shifter no decked heads all my bikes mantain their stock trim besides bolt on's. None of those expensive engine ECU or internal engine modifications are worth any air on a R3. The only way the dealer would ever be able to tell if I raced my bike would be by the tire wear but I have a No Mar tire machine at home so changing from race tires to street tires is easy.
 

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Did you see the photos of my bike? No stickers no qucik shifter no decked heads all my bikes mantain their stock trim besides bolt on's. None of those expensive engine ECU or internal engine modifications are worth any air on a R3. The only way the dealer would ever be able to tell if I raced my bike would be by the tire wear but I have a No Mar tire machine at home so changing from race tires to street tires in easy.
Sounds like you are doing it very stealthily but you could still get caught by an ECU data dump.

Even outboard motors have ECUs these days. They can show you exactly how the motor was used, or abused.
 
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