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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a 2019 R3 with insurance money after my Triumph Street Triple R had been rear-ended and totaled. Before the Triumph I rode a 300 Ninja. But I didn't care for the looks of the new 400 Ninja, I generally like Yamaha (I've owned 3), and so I chose the R3 with ABS. After I rode it I was a little disappointed, though, and I actually preferred the 300 Ninja to the R3. So I got to work.

The stock Dunlop tires are terrible. Anything is better but I like Michelins.
The R6 throttle tube perks the R3 up a lot.
The farty stock muffler is a dud. Akrapovic always makes the most power no matter the bike so I got their carbon fiber slip-on. It also looks great.
Norton Motorsports reflashed the ECU for a street bike. You have to get a non-ABS ECU though. And I installed their block-off plate. The fueling is really nice now.
The rear shock is useless. A good, affordable upgrade is a 2009-15 650 Ninja shock with the Norton Motorsports spacer. The bike turns better, rides better, and handles better now. Even the mirrors give me a better view.
The brakes were numb so I installed Spiegler steel braided lines with HH pads.
Then I got the TST Industries integrated tail light and flush mounted LED turn signals. Looks trick.
The Womet-Tech bar ends eliminated numbs hands.
A Saddlemens gel seat eliminated a numb butt.
A Puig windscreen is better than the stocker and with its sharper pitch makes the bike more comfortable.
Folding shorty levers. The clutch lever won't break then if you're in a crash.
R&G axle protectors on the front and spools on the rear for a track stand.

Still to go: Dynapro fork springs. They cost 3 times what the stockers do so they have to be better.
Maybe a velocity stack from Norton Motorsports. I'll have to send the ECU to be reflashed for the right cylinder.
Perhaps in 6 months I'll get a Shorai lithium ion battery.

All told, the bike's a good 15 pounds lighter, it looks better, handles better, stops better, rides better, runs better, and is quite a bit faster.
 

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Can you comment on how the R3 (before mods) compares to the Ninja 300 ? I hesitated between the two bikes before pulling the trigger on a R3. I'm not disappointed with the R3 but then again, when I bought it, it several of the above mods installed, so I never experienced a stock R3.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sure. To me, the stock 300 Ninja pulled harder than the stock R3. The Ninja's redline is 13K whereas the R3's is 12,500, though with the ECU reflash mine has been raised to 13K and the idle speed increased 200 rpm to 1450. And the 300 Ninja fit me better, though the pegs are a little high. And the 300 Ninja had a better suspension than the R3's, even the 2019 version of the R3 which got a firmer shock and a firmer USD fork. The R3 supposedly has 37 hp stock to the 300 Ninja's 35. The Ninja also has a slipper clutch, though that is inconsequential on the R3. Ive never had a problem downshifting with the R3. My posture on the R3 has my head more erect. I think on the Ninja it was falling forward, which is something my chiropractor helped me correct. One last thing: the Ninja has a much better headlight, though I did have to change the bulb 3 times in 33,000 miles. That's something else I'll have to change on the R3. I like my R3 a lot now but, as I say, it took a lot of work. But since I got the bike for free, basically, I haven't minded.
 

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Thanks for those comments. I also found the riding posture on the R3 a little too upright. I remounted the stock clip ons below the triple tree and that helped quite a bit. I also replaced the stock halogen headlight bulbs with LED's which greatly improved night time visibility.
 

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I'll play the opposition here. Don't get me wrong, I had all those mods and much much more as well so I was in your shoes and spent lots and lots of money on parts. It was my first experience. Now I wouldn't have done it.

I will agree with R6 throttle tube mod and front and rear suspension mods. You need both on this bike. Then to correct the posture to your liking one may optionally install lower clipons and/or higher seat. That's it. Everything else is just not needed.

R3 doesn't need a lot of help!

First let's talk about tyres. How does one know if they are bad if they are not taken to the limits of braking or cornering where they start slipping and sliding like at the track? I was never able to overcome the limits of the stock tyres in the street when I had R3. So how come people say they are "bad"? Tradition to speak bad about everything which is stock?

Any slipon exhaust doesn't give noticable power. It only changes the sound. Slipons are used for cosmetic purposes only. You know it's there, it sounds louder and your brain "feels" an improvement. It's a bias and not really there. I'd still buy it to make a bike look and sound better but not from performance perspective. If one went with full exhaust path it would change things very very slightly in performance field but the changes would still be so minor that almost not needed unless you compete at the track. I had both, a slipon and full exhaust on R3 so I know what I'm talking about.

I've never heard anyone using a block off plate with a slipon exhaust. I trust it doesn't affect the power. I'll trust objective measurements of this mod in the combination with a slipon which I guess noone ever did.

I had Norton Motorsport ECU with a slipon. I wouldn't recommend this combination. The ECU changes fuel ratio and because of the catalytic converter on the bike with a slipon, it makes it run much hotter and the converter heats up way too much underneath the bike almost red hot. ECU mod must be used with full exhausts only. Maybe now he changed the fuel map but I wouldn't use the ECU mod with the stock mid pipe

Braided brake lines don't do anything, don't change anything. The stock brake lines are as good as braided ones. It's a bias. I swapped to braided lines on R3 then went back to the stock ones. The problem with mushy brakes on R3 is mere existence of ABS. All ABS enabled R3s for some reason have this kind of brake feel to it. And it cannot be fixed.

LED lights, windshield, mirrors, axle sliders, levers (stock levers are surprisingly very good) do not really need to be changed unless it's just for cosmetic purposes.

Selling modded bike is a problem. People don't like buying modded bikes. If they agree to buy it, those mods won't add any value to it.
 

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As the owner of an R3 and a Street Triple R, I can relate to the braking issue. It's not that the brakes are crap in terms of performance, but their total lack of feel compared to the Street Triple is very off-putting.

I can also relate to what @privilege15 says, in that no amount of money has fixed it. I put braided lines, sintered pads and a Brembo radial master cylinder on to try and get some more feel. I may have got a tiny bit more braking power, but the lack of feel remains.

Regarding the suspension, unless you're tracking the bike, I find the stock suspension is reasonable on the R3. For my 80kg mass, I'd have to be riding far harder than is safe on the road before the suspension showed its weaknesses.

I did upgrade my tyres to Road 5s for a bit more wet weather grip. I found the stock tyres fine in the dry, but they did feel more skitterish than I liked when the roads were wet.

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
 

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LED lights, windshield, mirrors, axle sliders, levers (stock levers are surprisingly very good) do not really need to be changed unless it's just for cosmetic purposes.
I'm in agreement with most of your comments except for the one about LED headlights. No the stock halogen bulbs don't need really to be changed. And yes it's illegal in most jurisdictions to insert LED lights into a housing made for halogen bulbs. But to say that converting to LED headlights is just for cosmetic purposes is not correct. The increase in light output from the LED's compared to the halogens is very noticeable. I live in an area with a huge deer population and there are many collisions between vehicles and deer. Colliding with a deer while riding would not end well. The LED's allow for much better night vision and the ability to see obstacles and hazards sooner improves rider safety.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'll play the opposition here. Don't get me wrong, I had all those mods and much much more as well so I was in your shoes and spent lots and lots of money on parts. It was my first experience. Now I wouldn't have done it.

I will agree with R6 throttle tube mod and front and rear suspension mods. You need both on this bike. Then to correct the posture to your liking one may optionally install lower clipons and/or higher seat. That's it. Everything else is just not needed.

R3 doesn't need a lot of help!

First let's talk about tyres. How does one know if they are bad if they are not taken to the limits of braking or cornering where they start slipping and sliding like at the track? I was never able to overcome the limits of the stock tyres in the street when I had R3. So how come people say they are "bad"? Tradition to speak bad about everything which is stock?

Any slipon exhaust doesn't give noticable power. It only changes the sound. Slipons are used for cosmetic purposes only. You know it's there, it sounds louder and your brain "feels" an improvement. It's a bias and not really there. I'd still buy it to make a bike look and sound better but not from performance perspective. If one went with full exhaust path it would change things very very slightly in performance field but the changes would still be so minor that almost not needed unless you compete at the track. I had both, a slipon and full exhaust on R3 so I know what I'm talking about.

I've never heard anyone using a block off plate with a slipon exhaust. I trust it doesn't affect the power. I'll trust objective measurements of this mod in the combination with a slipon which I guess noone ever did.

I had Norton Motorsport ECU with a slipon. I wouldn't recommend this combination. The ECU changes fuel ratio and because of the catalytic converter on the bike with a slipon, it makes it run much hotter and the converter heats up way too much underneath the bike almost red hot. ECU mod must be used with full exhausts only. Maybe now he changed the fuel map but I wouldn't use the ECU mod with the stock mid pipe

Braided brake lines don't do anything, don't change anything. The stock brake lines are as good as braided ones. It's a bias. I swapped to braided lines on R3 then went back to the stock ones. The problem with mushy brakes on R3 is mere existence of ABS. All ABS enabled R3s for some reason have this kind of brake feel to it. And it cannot be fixed.

LED lights, windshield, mirrors, axle sliders, levers (stock levers are surprisingly very good) do not really need to be changed unless it's just for cosmetic purposes.

Selling modded bike is a problem. People don't like buying modded bikes. If they agree to buy it, those mods won't add any value to it.

I didn't have any of those problems with the Akrapovic slip-on and the reflashed ECU from Norton Motorsports. The bike, to me, runs much, much better. As for the brakes, they feel pretty good now. And about the stock tires, they scared me--just on the freeway! I'm hardly a great or fast rider but I think I know what good front end grip is. 2019 and later R3s came with LED headlamps but they're pretty bad and certainly need new LEDs with more lumens. Finally, the 300 Ninja's engine is smoother than the R3's. I definitely felt that.
 

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Agree, Yamaha makes snappy throttle response motorcycles. At least that's what other people say about Yamaha bikes and that's what I experienced. They aren't smooth I agree. I like aggressive throttle. Some people don't. If all motorcycles were alike that wouldn't be interesting. For example I took a ride on BMW S1000R once. It was sooo smooth and refined that it was boring to ride it. I wouldn't buy it just because of that. However many riders like smoothness.

It could be that I got used to Yamaha house throttle response after riding Yamaha only bikes for many years but that's how things are at least for me.
 

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I absolutely hated the stock exhaust can, it was so boomy to my ears. I think I got a Tyga slip-on, no more boom in my helmet. It's the only reason I bothered.

You can tell the difference between cheap hard tires and ones that are soft and grippy, even on public roads. I don't know what kind of tires are stock on the R3 though.

The other stuff I don't know about, I'm not much of a modder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for those comments. I also found the riding posture on the R3 a little too upright. I remounted the stock clip ons below the triple tree and that helped quite a bit. I also replaced the stock halogen headlight bulbs with LED's which greatly improved night time visibility.
How accessible are the headlight bulbs? You just pull the cowling off on either side of the dash and then the sockets are in plain view? I'm going to replace my LED lights with brighter ones
 

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How accessible are the headlight bulbs? You just pull the cowling off on either side of the dash and then the sockets are in plain view? I'm going to replace my LED lights with brighter ones
It really depends on how small your hands are. The bigger they are the more things you have to remove 😂
 

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How accessible are the headlight bulbs? You just pull the cowling off on either side of the dash and then the sockets are in plain view? I'm going to replace my LED lights with brighter ones
I have a 2018, so it may be a little different than on your 2019. If I were just replacing the stock halogens with other halogen bulbs, then I could have reached in from behind the headlight cowling and replaced them without removing anything. The LED's I used are much larger than the halogen bulbs because of the cooling fans and external drivers. I removed the headlight cowling to access the rear of the headlights and make this conversion.
 

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You went from a Street Triple to an R3? How?!? I've got a 2016 R3 that I'm looking to convert to a track bike and pick up a Striple R in the spring. R3 is fun and nimble but I can't imagine stepping down in torque like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I liked the Street Triple R a lot. I looked at buying a 2019 new (I was rear-ended in May of that year), and I got quite a bit of insurance money. But I have no debt and didn't want to take on any.
I don't believe in going in debt for motorcycles, in particular. I had a 300 Ninja before the Street Triple but didn't care for the looks of the 400 Ninja and got the R3 because I did like its looks. I missed the hp of the Triumph sometimes but where I ride I couldn't use it that much, and small bikes are fun and make you a better rider. I look at new bikes and am interested in the 650 Ninja, the 650 VStrom, the new Versys (I loved mine), the Guzzi V100, the Honda CB1000, the Kawasaki Z900, the Aprilia 660, and maybe the new Yamaha XSR900, but I expect to hang onto the R3.
 

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Personally I thought the Street Triple 765 was kinda anemic off the line, but then a bit maniacal to entirely rev out on the street, frustrating. I can sort of understand stepping down to an R3 to be able to actually thrash the engine. I recently picked up the latest CBR650R, the 2021 added higher rev limit (13K) and SFF BP forks and an updated console. It's significantly less crazy than the 765 while still being fairly quick when pushed. Unfortunately Honda hasn't priced it that attractively, but if you ever get the chance to ride a 2021+ model it's hilariously fun without being intense like the 765.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Personally I thought the Street Triple 765 was kinda anemic off the line, but then a bit maniacal to entirely rev out on the street, frustrating. I can sort of understand stepping down to an R3 to be able to actually thrash the engine. I recently picked up the latest CBR650R, the 2021 added higher rev limit (13K) and SSF BP forks and an updated console. It's significantly less crazy than the 765 while still being fairly quick when pushed. Unfortunately Honda hasn't priced it that attractively, but if you ever get the chance to ride a 2021+ model it's hilariously fun without being intense like the 765.
I've always liked that Honda but rode a friend's 2018 and was pretty disappointed. Perhaps it was because his tire pressure was way down, like 24 psi or something, so the steering felt sluggish. I remember my 675 R being pretty fast all over. I liked that bike a lot. It was the 2012 with upswept dual mufflers and steel braided brake lines. A quality bike. The R3 with the reflashed ECU is pretty light and quick. I like it.
 

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Personally I thought the Street Triple 765 was kinda anemic off the line, but then a bit maniacal to entirely rev out on the street, frustrating. I can sort of understand stepping down to an R3 to be able to actually thrash the engine. I recently picked up the latest CBR650R, the 2021 added higher rev limit (13K) and SSF BP forks and an updated console. It's significantly less crazy than the 765 while still being fairly quick when pushed. Unfortunately Honda hasn't priced it that attractively, but if you ever get the chance to ride a 2021+ model it's hilariously fun without being intense like the 765.
How do you find the riding position of the CBR compared to the R3? Is it slightly sportier, or similar to the R3?

Unfortunately, over here, Honda only import the restricted (42 hp or so) version, so there is a bit of work required to derestrict it, but it is on the list as an option for a potential future bike.

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the steering felt sluggish
Yeah the CBR650R is a healthy 456 lbs fully wet, and if I understand correct, errs on the side of being a stable road bike, and not a nimble track weapon.

How do you find the riding position of the CBR compared to the R3? Is it slightly sportier, or similar to the R3?
It's been a while since I've been on an R3, but the CBR650R does strike me as probably more aggressive than the R3, it's the first bike where my legs/ankles feel cramped up, and I feel like I'm getting over the tank. It's the first bike I've had to buy a tank pad for, as my jacket was scuffing it all up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The Honda CBR650R, at least in 2021, looks beautiful though. I wish it had 100 hp instead of 80 or 82. The riding position? The clip-ons aren't low so it felt fine. It just wasn't exciting to ride. The Triumph Street Triple is a lot more fun, and the Triple's exhaust note is pretty intoxicating. It's worth getting just for that.
 
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