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hi guys, I just got my bike that I do plan on learning on how to do some basic maintenance down the line like minor adjustment(brake/clutch etc something basic)/oil changes. Any basic tools/wrenches to get to prepare for future?

I just got my bike but I will rack up miles pretty fast with the commute I have to do daily(50-80miles/day). It would be good to get a head start and not buy expensive tools when the time comes when I am prepared
 

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A basic 'mechanics' tool set will set you back about $100. You will want a 3/8" drive ratchet with metric sockets (short and deep sockets are nice), a set of metric allen wrenches (T-handles are an upgrade), some screwdrivers, set of metric box/open end wrenches as a minimum. I've used the 'evolve' tool sets at the track - for occasional use they are fine. You can spend lots more, but that's up to you.

http://www.sears.com/craftsman-evol...0910026000P?prdNo=49&blockNo=49&blockType=G49


Not a big fan of the multi-tip screwdrivers, and some of the stuff shown you might not use much, but this gives you an idea of the basic bits you'll likely need.
 

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You'll want a torque wrench for your chain adjustments. An inexpensive beam wrench is fine for that application. Choose one that has your desired torque around the middle of its range (e.g., for the axle nut, with a torque spec of 41 ft-lbs, a wrench with a range of 0-75 ft-lbs would be appropriate).

And of course a rear stand. Even lubing the chain is an enormous PITA without a stand.
 

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I also think there's something to be said for buying quality tools open stock, at least to some extent. A comprehensive set of cheap cr*p from China will mean you probably have the tool you're looking for ... but they'll be uncomfortable in your hands (to the point of cutting you and/or causing blisters, plus balancing poorly making precise turns harder), liable to strip your fasteners, and not warranted when they fail or wear. You'll spend a little more buying open stock, but you can spread the pain out by buying only what you need when you need it, and not having a toolbox full of 'Murkin sizes collecting rust.

Last time we set up a new garage, that's what we did. A couple of really good 3/8" drive ratchets in different lengths - Snap-On if you can afford it, but Craftsman will do you fine. 6 point hex head and Allen socket sets in the smaller sizes, but individual sockets for the larger fasteners particular to our bikes. (Honestly haven't been through the R3 enough yet to know what odd sizes it might need. I'm not even sure what size those Torx fasteners on the brake calipers are ... it was the biggest one we had in the house. Axle heads front and rear are 19 mm, so, a long handled 19 mm box wrench. Rear axle nut is 22 mm, front is 17, which you'd want that 17 mm socket anyway since it's most bikes' oil drain plug size.) T-handle Allen wrenches in 4, 5 and 6 mm. A spinner and a couple of socket extensions in different lengths, including one ball-end. Two each, 10 mm and 12 mm open-end wrenches for your cable and foot control adjustments. A good screwdriver set if you don't have one already. An oil filter socket. A soft hammer (aka rubber mallet). Needle-nose, standard and channel-lock pliers. A torque wrench in the neighborhood of 0-75 ft-lb range.

And a factory service manual for your bike. That'll get you started. (I'm sure I missed something - someone else will point it out if I don't find it first. ;) )

Air compressor ought to be high on the list too, if only a small one to make sure you top up your tires before every ride. And of course you already have a high quality, comfortable tire gauge, right? Then a blow gun attachment is great for drying out the nooks and crannies, especially the chain, after washing (plus evicting any mice, grrrrrr).
 

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The brake caliper bolts are T50 torx, so get one of those, otherwise, what they said. I have a big craftsman set that's I've had for 15 years, works fine, but the most commonly used tool in my box is this long reach hex driver set by Grey Pneumatic:
 

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A JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) screwdriver set!

Regular screw drivers will, eventually, strip out the heads of the screws. This bikes fairings are loaded with screws too.

That is the set I use and it is wonderful.
How funny, I never knew there was a different standard for phillips head screwdrivers, but I noticed a long time ago that most of them don't fit for ****, and I ground the tips of some of my own to make them fit better... learn something new everyday :)
 

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Ah, I see. I'm having flashbacks to my 600R, where the little triangular piece that holds the fairing lowers together in the front needed a stubby #3 Phillips, since neither a ratchet nor an ordinary length screwdriver (particularly the #3 s which are normally long) would fit behind the front tire. You didn't even know there was such a tool, and neither did most of the places I tried to buy one. F!!!er had to come off every oil change. #thingsIdon'tmiss
 

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Building a toolbox. Matching needs with $

I inherited a bunch of tools from my brother who was an architect but did alarms, car stereos, etc while in college. He taught me to ride & was a pretty bad ass DIY/Handy-Guy/Self-taught mechanic/electrician. Unfortunately he is deceased so his tools are sentimental to me. I'm the techie/Dremel modder/PC modder + Gamer of the family.

Anyway, I have a bunch but need some more. My brother was a neat freak who kept them organized but my deceased father who was also handy left them all over my Mom's house-in work shop, shed, garage, etc.

So I lent the top chest to a friend to help him out when he got a auto repair job-dude got fired in like 2 weeks and changed his # and haven't heard back from him since. So have to replace the top chest for the drawer chest. Nice right?

So I am building my motorcycle centric and Yamaha R3 specific tools. I have some sockets but need to get some more. Do you go with 1/2" drive for strength or 1/4" drive for tighter areas like on a motorcycle? What about allen wrenches? Do you get regular L-types or T-handles? I actually don't have safety wire pliers, a torque wrench, or some supplies like locktite which are indispensable for motorcycle work. Anyway have a barebones minimum list of tools that they'd like to share?

Trying to do more work on the bike myself instead of relying on bike shops and paying crazy labor rates. Should've learned more from my bro who was my de facto mechanic.

Thanks from Brooklyn!

Kenji
 

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I inherited a bunch of tools from my brother who was an architect but did alarms, car stereos, etc while in college. He taught me to ride & was a pretty bad ass DIY/Handy-Guy/Self-taught mechanic/electrician. Unfortunately he is deceased so his tools are sentimental to me. I'm the techie/Dremel modder/PC modder + Gamer of the family.

Anyway, I have a bunch but need some more. My brother was a neat freak who kept them organized but my deceased father who was also handy left them all over my Mom's house-in work shop, shed, garage, etc.

So I lent the top chest to a friend to help him out when he got a auto repair job-dude got fired in like 2 weeks and changed his # and haven't heard back from him since. So have to replace the top chest for the drawer chest. Nice right?

So I am building my motorcycle centric and Yamaha R3 specific tools. I have some sockets but need to get some more. Do you go with 1/2" drive for strength or 1/4" drive for tighter areas like on a motorcycle? What about allen wrenches? Do you get regular L-types or T-handles? I actually don't have safety wire pliers, a torque wrench, or some supplies like locktite which are indispensable for motorcycle work. Anyway have a barebones minimum list of tools that they'd like to share?

Trying to do more work on the bike myself instead of relying on bike shops and paying crazy labor rates. Should've learned more from my bro who was my de facto mechanic.

Thanks from Brooklyn!

Kenji
Use socket allen keys for speed and ease. Get the long ones, as you will need them for installing some of the various models of slider pucks, removing hose clamps deep within the engine, etc.

I normally use 3/8 drive cause my torque wrench is 3/8.

Of course there are times when a smaller 1/4 is better. An example is when removing the stock hose, or any work in that tight space around the fairing stay/forks.

The only time i use 1/2 drive is when the impact wrench needs to come out, and thats for things like stubborn calipers or rotor bolts.

All those consumables you listed should only cost about $20 at harbor freight. Some people hate harbor freight but its not like you will be safety wiring stuff 8 hours a day, every day, so the whole "their stuff breaks so easy" argument is kind of invalid for me.

I would make a list for you but I am too lazy, so I will just snap some pics tomorrow.
 

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Thanks for the feedback guys. Yeah, this stemmed from basically shopping for a torque wrench and some tools. Never had safety wire pliers and always did it with some needle nose manually by hand-maybe I'll get the actual tool. Currently, I have some 1/4" drive and 1/2" drive stuff. I have one large torque wrench that isn't practical for a lot of areas on a bike. We would all love to have tons of tools but it's smart to maybe think ahead of maximize number of tools with available space, current and future needs with budget.

Your bike costs $, so does the maintenance, and then it's easy to go crazy with upgraded parts, riding gear, and tools. BEfore you know it you've exceded the retail price of the bike in parts, gear, and tools.
 
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