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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello forum,

just got my first bike, and its a r3.

my first experiences with this bike, something i didn't have a problem when i took the safety course, nor did i see this problem in some demo drives i did at dealerships .


1. When i ride, only in first gear, the Throttle seems to be extremely sensitive. Now I dont know if its just normal and i have a bigger learning curve then most or if something is not calibrated right. the smallest /slights pressure to go up or down, the bike will jerk and throw me a little as it jumps so fast up and down.

** I never experienced that in the courses (of cours those were smaller ccs) but also i did a demo ride of the R3 , took it out for 30 mins and never experienced that... its starting to hurt my feelings lol.

2. I am having a huge difficulty mastering slowing down and pulling in front brakes smoothly,
- one of the issues with this is #1 above , i find that it is a bit of a stretch on my fingers to reach and pull the levers ... the levers land at the tip of my fingers... so when i try to use them , i end up letting go of the throttle to fast and jerk,
-- second reason also my hands feel sore after from the stretch (and not the vibration you normally would expect).

so question , is it possible the levers should be sized , do ppl get that done is it expected.?

3. what is the exact process of hand/foot moments when you slow down...
ie. pull in clutch at the same time as you throttle down, then after throttle is off, pull in brakes??.. etc...

any guidance/advice would be appreciated.. because I am starting to doubt if i am at all a rider ..

thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Re read my original post and so RE WRITING IT TO BE MORE CLEARER::

==================================================

Hello forum,

just got my first bike, and its a r3.

my first experiences with this bike, something i didn't have a problem when i took the safety course, nor did i see this problem in some demo drives i did at dealerships .


1. When i ride, only in first gear, the Throttle seems to be extremely sensitive. Now I dont know if its just normal and i have a bigger learning curve then most or if something is not calibrated right. the smallest /slightest pressure to go up or down, the bike will jerk and throw me a little as it jumps so fast up and down.

** I never experienced that in the courses (of cours those were smaller ccs) but also i did a demo ride of the R3 , took it out for 30 mins and never experienced that... its starting to hurt my feelings lol.

2. I am having a huge difficulty mastering slowing down and pulling in front brakes smoothly,
- one of the issues with this is #1 above

- Second reason i think is also because I find that it is a bit of a stretch on my fingers to reach and pull the clutch or front brake levers ... the levers land at the tip of my fingers... so when i try to use them , i end up stretching to put force to pull them in a little and when i do this, sometimes the throttle wiilslip in my hand hence letting go of the throttle too fast and then being jerked,
-- second reason also my hands feel sore after from the stretch (and not the vibration you normally would expect).

so [email protected] , is it possible the levers should be sized , do ppl get that done is it expected.?

3. what is the exact process of hand/foot moments when you slow down...
ie. pull in clutch at the same time as you throttle down, then after throttle is off, pull in brakes??.. etc...
any guidance/advice would be appreciated.. because I am starting to doubt if i am at all a rider ..

thanks
 

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A few thoughts ...

-- The throttle action you describe is not normal. Did you buy this brand new from a dealership? Factory stock throttle is progressive, with the first part of the travel very forgiving. If you got the bike second-hand I suspect this was modified, otherwise, have the dealer look at the linkage & test ride.

-- Lots of different techniques used successfully for slowing down, and I'd suspect you will improve yours with practice. I usually downshift a few gears on approach to stop & may not actually go in-gear to first -- rather approaching the end of the stop I'll clutch-in and kick down to first and keep the clutch in to maintain that gear. I never sit at a light in neutral, since getting first from neutral is iffy sometimes.

-- You can get shorter-reach levers, and this may be key for you. I find it very convenient to work the throttle and brake simultaneously, which is easy to do on the R3 provided your finger span provides the reach (again -- have a dealer check for stock throttle specs. This is a very light, predictable and easily modulated throttle stock). A shorter reach and practice blipping/downshifting while working the brake will make everything more graceful during slow-downs & stops.

All of this will become second-nature to you with practice. Motorcycles are like any other interactive thing: after a few weeks of aggravating miscues, muscle memory will eventually take over and everything that seems tough now will become second nature.
 

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Without actually riding your bike, my answer to #1 will be my best guess - which is that the issue is more you than the bike. But don't let that make you think that you are not cut out to ride, you are just new and it takes time to get smooth and comfortable. First gear on these bikes is very short for a sport bike. This bike is not intended to be "ridden" in first gear. If riding at low speeds, use first to get to second and then cruise at low speed in second. Also, make sure that your throttle play is properly adjusted. Too much play and the initial throttle twist will not result in gas/acceleration. The owners manual should address adjusting the throttle play, if not, check out the thread on installing the R6 throttle tube as it addresses adjusting the throttle play. If the throttle play is correct, just practice using good tempo with the gas. Just like you need good tempo when releasing the clutch, you need it with the gas as well.

For #2 , lots of people get adjustable levers to fix the issue you are having. Just depends on hand size and lever position preference.

For #3 (assuming "normal" street riding), if not downshifting before you make a complete stop, release throttle, apply brakes, pull in clutch a second or two before you stop. You will get the feel of when the clutch needs to be pulled. If downshifting during the stopping process, release throttle, apply brakes, downshift (as many times as necessary) and pull in clutch a second or two before coming to a full stop. In summary, clutch is last and not pulled in at the same time as the brakes unless you are immediately downshifting.

Been riding street/track for 10 years. My first couple of months were very frustrating as well. Lots of doubt, questioning why I was riding. You just need practice and confidence.
 

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Progressive or not, the R3's throttle is a little bit touchy when rolling along slowly in first gear. My suggestion would be to get out of first gear. Get the bike moving and then get out of first gear and into second until you get a better feel for the bike. Second gear is much less twitchy.
As Deddie mentioned, adjustable levers will make a big difference for you, if you're having trouble with reaching them.
Slowing down is fairly easy on the R3 since it has great engine braking. Get a feel for the bike and then start practicing your downshifting. There's a few videos on YouTube that display the process pretty well. Easy to understand and only time and lots of practice will smooth things out for you.

Then, you'll be looking for the R6 throttle tube to get even more responsiveness from the throttle. :)
 

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How are you pulling in the front brakes? All fingers? I am by far an expert but I have found my pointer and middle finger on the brake, pulling hard, just shorts locking it up, so i keep those two fingers free for the brake and the other three for the throttle.
 

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First gear can be a bit twitchy if you're doing slow maneuvers, say - in a parking lot or gas station. There's two things you can do that I found helpful. First, if you're maneuvering around a parking lot doing slow turns, etc and rolling too slow for second gear you can slip the clutch to maintain speed around 5 or 6 mph without jerking. This will of course take some practice. Or you can shift into 2nd which is less touchy but might bog the engine if you're rolling too slow.

For stopping, the R3 engine brakes quite well. I'm usually looking as far ahead in traffic as I can to try and predict how much braking power and distance I need to slow down for conditions. For this I use engine braking and downshifting unless I know I have to come to a full stop (like intersections). In which I usually start with the rear brake and add front progressively as needed. I'll use both equally under harder braking.

In the end its about feeling the bike, so practicing slow maneuvers in an empty parking lot is definitely recommended.
 

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1st gear is designed to get the bike rolling from a dead stop and is rarely used for anything else.

My opinion for learning, all slow speed maneuvering should be done in 2nd, including rolling in stop and go traffic. With how first is geared in any car/bike/atv etc its very jerky because 1st gear like I said is designed to get you moving from a stop and not for slow speed maneuvers. Learning to feather the clutch in and out during slow speed maneuvers is key. Once your comfortable with how the bike reacts in 2nd doing those maneuvers you can use 1st gear.... but it will be much easier learning all that in 2nd(less chance of over throttle). Slow speed maneuvers is more clutch control than throttle control.

You shouldnt be gearing down into 1st in my opinion. I only drop into 1st at a complete stop, or at a snails pace.

Downshifting takes quite a bit of practice to master so I highly recommend only practicing down shifting when its safe to do and your comfortable in that if you do something incorrectly you wont cause an accident or dump yourself off the bike.
1st.. get used to downshifting through the gears without releasing the clutch between shifts when coming to a stop. ie crusing to a stop you're holding in the clutch the whole time while dropping gears 4-->3-->2. This will give you a rough idea of what speed you should be downshifting to the next gear... it will clunk if your going to fast for a lower gear and will be butter smooth if your in the 'happy' speed range for the next lower gear, even without releasing the clutch.
2nd.. once you're comfortable you have the downshifting down.. you can then practice downshifting by releasing the clutch between shifts. This really boils down to getting a sense of at what speed your going to downshift to the next gear.
3rd... master rev matching during downshifts to smooth out your downshifitng.

And like most others have mentioned, adjustable levers are the only way to solve the reach issue with your hands.

Just my 0.02 cents :)
 

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A lot of recent bikes with ride-by-wire and/or fuel injection have abrupt throttle response. My old bikes were so smooth on the throttle.
 

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A lot of recent bikes with ride-by-wire and/or fuel injection have abrupt throttle response. My old bikes were so smooth on the throttle.
Which is WHY.... both of my bikes do NOT have "ride-by-wire" throttle.

My CBR is the smoothest bike I have ever ridden.
 

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For breaking it definitely takes time. I'm a new rider an around the 200 mile mark I finally found the right place for my right foot so it can hit the rear break (for me it's in s terrible position but I finally figured a way) if your to hard on the front break it will dive and if you do it hard enough I think you can throw yourself right off. Around the 400mile mark it became second nature to use the rear break and slowly the front don't be mean to the rear either of course but the back doesn't seem to have the same bite. Even my boyfriend whose been riding for 8/9 years basically accidently stoppied... but to be fair he's use to riding bigger bikes.
 

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I have to argue and say if your not use to the type of bike the r3 is the throttle seems sensitive.. it depends on what is described as sensitive, is it stock, does it stay there for a moment does it get stuck? The jerky motion, is it like kind of like a throwing stutter? (I've experienced this from not keeping the throttle in the same place kind of like a little movement in my hand it can jerk you. I've discussed it with once of the dealers mechanic and he explained that to me?) Have you changed grips? I'd look at is your grip stationary? Make sure it can't move by its self even a little. These are my opinions if your ever worried about your throttle you can call usually your local Yamaha shop (at least near me) and speak to the mechanic.. the local one has a cool old dude. Best thing though if you aren't sure of what your doing always either take it to Yamaha or find a motorcycle mechanic a little guy. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you everyone for your replies, I finally figured out the cause . I was only able to figure it out by trial and error , testing out the ideas and suggestions you all provided.

Here is a summary incase it helps.. ... I saw some of you recommend that i just try not practice with 2nd gear.. and that grealy helped smooth out the ride, and once it was smooth , i was able to slwo it down in terms of practicing the basics.

As some of you suggested 1st geat is not meant to be driven for prolonged riding and now is see why.

Also as i smoothed out my ride , calibrated my reaction to the throttle as i was in second gear I realized that my levers were not too far away, and that i can slow the bike down smoothly by letting off the throttle and THEN pull in the break....
'

thanks everyone!

Next up is how to recognize by sound and feel ( I think is how most ppl do it ?) of timing my shifting up and shifting down to the correct RPMs

Love to hear folks thoughts on this.
 

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I went from vibrations. It's so easy to go over. You're going to find yourself in 4/5 a lot in towns. You're going to be shifting ALOT! The bike seriously hates break in.. it's not going to stall or at least I haven't in a higher gear as long as I was still moving... accidents happen didn't have time to shift before a turn. Those miles will go fast. You can't really hear the bike or at least I couldn't until I got afull system.
 

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Thank for re-writing. It is definitely "more clearer." Is english your second language?

You need to slip the clutch at low speed. Using just the throttle will make it choppy. It might have works on the GZ250 the MSF course provides, but think of that as an exception.

You probably need to loosen your grip on the bars. It should not be difficult to reach out for the levers, unless you have Donald Trump hands. I ride with two fingers covering both levers almost exclusively.

My hands were sore when I bought my leather gloves, but that goes away once your body gets use to the position.
 

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My bike is only ever on 1st if I'm at walking speed ... literally .. as if I have my legs down and having to move the bike while sitting on it. If you're not too heavy and the road is on a slight descent it's probably ok to move out on 2nd even in a dead stop otherwise move it to 2nd the moment the bike is moving. As you said the 1st gear on the r3 is very very short and jerky
 

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The bike can do 2ND at 16mph. Anything under 5,000rpm you will get choppy in 1St it will jerk you especially if you're not apply any gas or inconsistent gas. If you need to go that slow you need to feather the clutch which takes time to learn to do properly.
With the break levers or clutch levers I have small hands I mean small my 8 year olds hands are almost the same size I manage the stretch. You'll have to get use to stretching that hand. With slowing down you have to slowly come to a stop under normal conditions... sounds like you're doing what I did grabbing to hard and not using your rear break at the same time. :) it'll come it'll come

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