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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry if there has already been a similar topic but I didn't see any specific to this. Basically I wanted to make a place for us noobs still learning where we can share something we learned or messed up so we can learn from each others mistakes or experiences. Because even though I have piled up seat time and even took the MSF course, there are things you just don't learn until you experience it. Even if its embarrassingly stupid or common sense I would like to hear it at least.

For example, today I learned that if you find your gears getting stuck, you probably shouldn't coast through a stop sign (or better yet never). For some reason I kept having trouble getting into the right gear today so at one stop sign I slowed to slow but was still in 3rd gear and didn't come to a complete stop. Bike stalled right in the middle of the intersection. Luckily no cars were coming.
 

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To pay attention to the side slope in the road. Stopped to close to the RH edge of the road waiting to make a right turn the other day and almost could not reach the ground on the RH side. It was a 2 lane road and rode to the right side of a car headed straight so I could turn right on red. I should have seen it and put my left foot down.
 

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It's been a few years since I was a noobie, but here's a couple of things I've learned that might not be commonly mentioned but could be useful.

Make sure your shoelaces aren't stuck in the shifter before putting your foot down. It makes for a great slow motion tip over.

Tar snakes, painted lines, expansion joints, railroads, etc are all way more slick than the pavement in the rain. Be extra careful applying throttle or brakes on them.

(hypocrit here, I always forget to do this) Carry a small microfiber cloth to wipe down your visor while stopped. Looking at that splattered bug between your eyes for hours on end gets really old.

It can get really cold, really fast if it starts raining and you are traveling quick. A garbage bag under your jacket will help tremendously in keeping you warm and "dryish". This is easy to store under your seat for emergencies along with the cloth mentioned above.

(hypocrit again) Check tire pressure fairly regularly. A few lbs of pressure lost in a tire can really affect handling and can severely cut down on tire life. My first set of tires were completely squared off thousands of miles early because I neglected to check tire pressure.

Always check to make sure your pockets are zippered up if you keep things in them. I've almost lost my insurance paperwork from this.

Turn your bike on, then get all your gear put on and zippered up. This let's the bike warm up a bit and it's ready to go by the time you are ready.

Saddlebags or a tailbag are worth their weight in gold if you commute. I bought saddlebags for this bike before I even picked it up from the dealer. Wearing a backpack sucks, and it really sucks if it's for more than an hour or if it weighs more than a few lbs.

Be careful parking the bike on pavement in the summer. The pavement softens up and your kickstand can sink into it. If the pavement cools before you leave, it can actually be stuck. Look for concrete to park on or use a kickstand puck.

I'm sure I'll think of some other things. If it's enough I'll make a part 2 ;)
 

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I learned that the more expensive the car, the shittier is the driver behind the wheel.
Here in Phoenix it's a tie between BMW's which attract true Asshats (a shame given how great a car they make) and SUV's that I think are less douchebag driver,but are so large the driver is oblivious to riders,cyclists
 

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Lowsidng isn't really that bad as long as you are relaxed. Do dress for the slide and not for the ride however. Oh and make sure you let the bike go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Make sure you double check that your rear seat is fully locked in place after putting it back on or it just might fly off on the freeway :(
 

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That a Severe Weather Warning is no excuse not to go pick up a new bike and R3's are very capable of riding through muddy water flowing over the road :D
 

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Make sure you double check that your rear seat is fully locked in place after putting it back on or it just might fly off on the freeway
Great excuse to order that SOLO rear seat COWL! :D
 

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Get key in the pocket first before putting on the gloves makes life easier and you wont look like you are jacking off on your bike cause you can't get the **** key out! Peace!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Get key in the pocket first before putting on the gloves makes life easier and you wont look like you are jacking off on your bike cause you can't get the **** key out! Peace!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Gloves are the very last thing to put on. Sooo many times I've put on my big winter gloves just to have to take them off to buckle my helmet. Going on 3 years of daily riding and I still mess that up occasionally
 

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That when it's 115 degrees out here in Phoenix,there are no "Summer" jackets
:eek:

No kidding! When it's 115 outside... my bikes are PARKED in the GARAGE!
NO riding for ME! I take car with air conditioning!

This upcoming weekend is supposed to be cooler. 100 high, 72 night-time low.
I'll be out riding at NIGHT.
:nerd:
 

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Riding on the interstate at 70 mph in strong cross winds is not fun. Only second time on interstate, and I think will stick to back mountains until or if I upgrade to an R6. R3 is so light that was being blown sideways, not fun.
 

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You'll get used to the highway, I've ridden in up to 35 mph cross winds with this bike. You do get blown around but it isn't too bad if you just let the bike do its thing and stay loose. Experience will help with this.

Also something to keep in mind, the 6 is only 40 lbs heavier, not going to be very much difference.
 

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If you're like me and have a 28" inseam, a tailbag can make throwing your leg over the bike a new challenge.

I look like I'm doing some kind of taekwondo side/axe kick MMA thing getting on and off now.
 

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I nominate this to be the BEST advice for newbies hehehehehe!!

Try to downshift to 1 or at very least 2 way before the actual stop. If you downshift very close to or until you've actually stopped there is a very high likelihood your gears will get stuck!

Nothing more embarrassing than a high gear stuck or lost somewhere in no man's land when the light turns green.
Even worse if you're on an incline where you can't rock the bike into gear and a bunch of cars behind ya!!
 
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