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so I have been offered to get Heavy duty clutch springs. do you think this is a worthwhile upgrade as I am doing a clutch refresh with new plates/springs bearing and cable. they asked if I want a 20% stiffer spring. will that make it work nicer? as it does feel kinda sloppy
 

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It'll make it harder to pull the clutch lever and it will increase the engagement force on the clutch plates. Personally I think the clutch on these bikes is "grabby" enough, I wouldn't want to put any stiffer springs on it, but that's just me. To each their own.
 
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It'll make it harder to pull the clutch lever and it will increase the engagement force on the clutch plates. Personally I think the clutch on these bikes is "grabby" enough, I wouldn't want to put any stiffer springs on it, but that's just me. To each their own.


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is there something that prevents the clutch from disengaging at higher revs? sometimes when I try to take off a little quicker and my rev is a little higher, as I ease off the clutch it hits a point where it jerks the bike almost like it wanted to stall or otherwise regulating the launch, then right after the jolt i'm good to go
 

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is there something that prevents the clutch from disengaging at higher revs? sometimes when I try to take off a little quicker and my rev is a little higher, as I ease off the clutch it hits a point where it jerks the bike almost like it wanted to stall or otherwise regulating the launch, then right after the jolt i'm good to go
Google how a clutch works. You should find all your answers in that. But no, there is nothing that prevents a clutch being disengaged at higher speed...although the rest of what you described has nothing to do with your question.
 

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Google how a clutch works. You should find all your answers in that. But no, there is nothing that prevents a clutch being disengaged at higher speed...although the rest of what you described has nothing to do with your question.
a disengaged clutch means the bike is in gear.. i think there was a translation mishap here..

my bike rattles and jolts like it wants to stall if i 'release' the clutch at high rpms from a stop... is this normal?
 

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a disengaged clutch means the bike is in gear.. i think there was a translation mishap here..

my bike rattles and jolts like it wants to stall if i 'release' the clutch at high rpms from a stop... is this normal?
Incorrect. A disengaged clutch means the plates are disengaged...aka, separated, so no power is being transferred from the engine which is spinning, to the transmission output shaft, and therefore the rear wheel. It has nothing to do with the gears.

The clutch connects one part that spins really fast with one that doesn't spin at all, so when you smash those together gradually, the fast spinning plate will have to slow down and the other will start spinning until they both reach the same speed (fully engaged, and the power is transferred to the wheel). So of course the faster you're reving the engine, the harder it will be on the clutch and you'll feel a jolt if you release the lever a bit too quick (recipe for doing a wheelie, or looping your bike from a standing start), or if you do it way too quick it won't have enough time to catch up to itself and instead the engine side one will stop. It's all physics...something's gotta give. Either you accelerate the non-moving plate by slipping it, or you stop the moving plate by brute force (basically how brakes work). If you release it too slow the plates will be slipping more.

Lots of videos on youtube that graphically show how all that works. Google it.
 
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@sbk1198 - would changing to heavier clutch springs in a slipper clutch make any difference to engine braking? (Specifically thinking stock slipper clutch on the ninja 300)
 

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@sbk1198 - would changing to heavier clutch springs in a slipper clutch make any difference to engine braking? (Specifically thinking stock slipper clutch on the ninja 300)
Yes, but only on downshifts. If you're in a particular gear at close to redline and simply let off the throttle without changing gears, I don't think you'll notice a difference. But that's how most aftermarket clutches control engine braking. Most offer different types for street or racing. Generally only racers bother to go with stiffer springs because they don't care about life of the clutch plates as much as they do about engine braking and engagement force. I had race springs on my Ducabike clutch on my old 1198 and on my ZX6R I have an STM clutch, for which I got a stiffer spring than it came with because I didn't like the lack of engine braking before. I wanted more engine braking and quicker engagement of the clutch. It was crazy before....you could literally bang down a couple of gears at full lean and it wouldn't even shake the rear end, but the downside was you had to wait for it a lot longer to fully engage and a lot of times I'd get back on the gas hard coming out of a turn and it still wouldn't be fully engaged and it would just slip and I wasn't getting very far lol I didn't like that. I can keep the rear wheel in check well enough with my left hand, I'd rather sacrifice a bit of smoothness and have more engine braking.

Can't say I've ever really pushed a ninja 300 clutch hard enough on the track since I never owned one, so can't help you there. Ridden a few but they belonged to others and didn't push very hard. You're much faster than me though so I'm sure you'd know better if you need different springs or not.
 
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