Yamaha R3 Forums banner
1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having done a handful of track days in the last year already (with coaching !) , really starting to get a good handle on the R3. A lot of fun, and it's really fun keeping up pace with the big bikes in my group. As a rider, I still have a couple fine tuning points, but overall progress is good.

Ready to dip my toe into the first upgrade to the bike. Given the choice, would you spend the money on rearsets (Sato), or a front fork upgrade (Öhlins) ?

The case for the rearsets is simple: Improve the riding position. I'm able to "make do" with the stock position, but think overall for the sporty riding position I desire in the corners and on the track, a good set would be beneficial all around. Would like to have a bit more ground clearance so I'm not dragging toes.

The case for a front suspension upgrade is to add some better stability and damping properties under cornering and hard braking. Was chatting with one of the Monster Energy/Factory Yamaha techs after the race at VIR last week, and he said the Öhlins upgrade was the first and best upgrade he did on his bike.

For what it's worth: I'm 173cm and 63kg. The bike sees 4-6 track days a year; most of the rest of the mileage I spend on the lovely curves and mountain roads where I live, so I think either of the upgrades would be appreciated even off the track. I have no plans to change/upsize bikes in the near future.

My budget doesn't allow me to do both at the same time. So which would you do first ? Thanks for any tips or comments .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Honestly, I would do the suspension upgrades and rearset risers. Good risers, like the ones from Jesse/NortonFab/YamahaR3Racing.com, will get you pretty close to where you want your feet for a fraction of the cost of a full set. You can save for the fancy ones later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Honestly, I would do the suspension upgrades and rearset risers. Good risers, like the ones from Jesse/NortonFab/YamahaR3Racing.com, will get you pretty close to where you want your feet for a fraction of the cost of a full set. You can save for the fancy ones later.
While you're at it get a Ninja 650 shock off eBay for $40, then contact Jesse and buy the adapter for $30. Will raise your rear end about and inch and help with ground clearance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,519 Posts
I would do what Rachel said. Suspension first, a cheap set of risers and save for the real Rearsets. @ engineeringanon: where did you get the k tech shock from? I have their RR version of the shock from computrack Boston and I still have not been able to get a hold of these guys after I paid for it to try and get a copy of my set up sheet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Wow, seems the choice is unequivocally for a fork upgrade. Well, that was pretty clear cut.

Drove over to Öhlins around lunch time today. Funny isn't it? Öhlins in North America is managed.....right out of a small shop about 40km away from me :laugh: . Had an at-length discussion with one of the engineers about what I was looking to get out of an upgrade, and what the cartridge kit had to offer. Also got a look of me their warehouse and the product. Mmmm sweeeet.



NIX 22 is what I'm considering, the front cartridge set. The rear shock, although extremely nice eye-candy, is not of prime concern at the moment.

He referred me to a dealer locally who sells and sets these up. I know it's pricey; I am guessing +/- 750-800 $US or so? Plus install, I bet.......*shakes piggy bank*.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Having done a handful of track days in the last year already (with coaching !) , really starting to get a good handle on the R3. A lot of fun, and it's really fun keeping up pace with the big bikes in my group. As a rider, I still have a couple fine tuning points, but overall progress is good.

Ready to dip my toe into the first upgrade to the bike. Given the choice, would you spend the money on rearsets (Sato), or a front fork upgrade (Öhlins) ?

The case for the rearsets is simple: Improve the riding position. I'm able to "make do" with the stock position, but think overall for the sporty riding position I desire in the corners and on the track, a good set would be beneficial all around. Would like to have a bit more ground clearance so I'm not dragging toes.

The case for a front suspension upgrade is to add some better stability and damping properties under cornering and hard braking. Was chatting with one of the Monster Energy/Factory Yamaha techs after the race at VIR last week, and he said the Öhlins upgrade was the first and best upgrade he did on his bike.

For what it's worth: I'm 173cm and 63kg. The bike sees 4-6 track days a year; most of the rest of the mileage I spend on the lovely curves and mountain roads where I live, so I think either of the upgrades would be appreciated even off the track. I have no plans to change/upsize bikes in the near future.

My budget doesn't allow me to do both at the same time. So which would you do first ? Thanks for any tips or comments .
If you'd have some interest, I'd be willing to part with a set of gently used NortonFab Generation II rearset risers (mentioned above) for $85 shipped to your door. They have one race weekend on them, and that's it. Like new.

In addition, I'm looking to part with a set of used gold eBay rearsets. These worked very well with the risers, I just didn't like the gold. They came with my R3 race bike when I got it. I just received a new set of black rearsets in the mail last week and no longer need these nor the risers. They have some wear on the heel guard, but they've never been down. Still shine up well. I'd part with these for $65 shipped to your door.

Buy both the risers and rearsets, and I'll give them to you for $130 shipped. Let me know!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,519 Posts
If you'd have some interest, I'd be willing to part with a set of gently used NortonFab Generation II rearset risers (mentioned above) for $85 shipped to your door. They have one race weekend on them, and that's it. Like new.

In addition, I'm looking to part with a set of used gold eBay rearsets. These worked very well with the risers, I just didn't like the gold. They came with my R3 race bike when I got it. I just received a new set of black rearsets in the mail last week and no longer need these nor the risers. They have some wear on the heel guard, but they've never been down. Still shine up well. I'd part with these for $65 shipped to your door.

Buy both the risers and rearsets, and I'll give them to you for $130 shipped. Let me know!
Mind posting pics? Don't care for the gold but could use an extra set as a spare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
The risers will let you reposition the stock rearsets to a location similar to aftermarket rearsets (higher up and further back). It's just a cheaper alternative to completely replacing the rearsets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Mind posting pics? Don't care for the gold but could use an extra set as a spare.
No problem. I will get some pictures taken later this evening and try to get them posted promptly. I took pictures of the risers last night, but not the rearsets.

Forgive the ignorance, but what do risers do, versus rear sets?
No worries! Perfectly fair question. Ruby answered it pretty spot-on. In this case, the NortonFab Gen II rearset risers actually provide a more aggressive (i.e. further up and further back) rearset position than most aftermarket rearsets do. It's a very common practice for racers and track-day R3 owners to combine Jesse's (Jesse Norton) rearset risers with aftermarket rearsets. This setup is the exact one I used for my first race weekend roadracing this season. However, I recently purchased a pretty aggressive set of aftermarket rearsets that puts me in a position NOT to need both the NortonFab risers + aftermarket rearsets.

That's the only reason I'm looking to part with both the aftermarket rearsets and the risers. New, the eBay rearsets I have go for a little over $100. The NortonFab Gen II risers go for $120+ new.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
IMO, I'd do rearsets/risers first. If you're outriding stock suspension the stock rearsets are getting majorly in the way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
In this case, the NortonFab Gen II rearset risers actually provide a more aggressive (i.e. further up and further back) rearset position than most aftermarket rearsets do. It's a very common practice for racers and track-day R3 owners to combine Jesse's (Jesse Norton) rearset risers with aftermarket rearsets. This setup is the exact one I used for my first race weekend roadracing this season. However, I recently purchased a pretty aggressive set of aftermarket rearsets that puts me in a position NOT to need both the NortonFab risers + aftermarket rearsets.

That's the only reason I'm looking to part with both the aftermarket rearsets and the risers. New, the eBay rearsets I have go for a little over $100. The NortonFab Gen II risers go for $120+ new.
I will consider the risers; how hard is the install? It sounds like something I'd be able to attempt myself......or? Way more cost effective than the Sato rearsets I was considering- hence why I said it was "either or".

I plan to stop by Thurs or Fri to local bike tuning shop that specialises in the R3 and other small bikes, get a better feel for pricing, install, support etc....for the suspension.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
In this case, the NortonFab Gen II rearset risers actually provide a more aggressive (i.e. further up and further back) rearset position than most aftermarket rearsets do. It's a very common practice for racers and track-day R3 owners to combine Jesse's (Jesse Norton) rearset risers with aftermarket rearsets. This setup is the exact one I used for my first race weekend roadracing this season. However, I recently purchased a pretty aggressive set of aftermarket rearsets that puts me in a position NOT to need both the NortonFab risers + aftermarket rearsets.

That's the only reason I'm looking to part with both the aftermarket rearsets and the risers. New, the eBay rearsets I have go for a little over $100. The NortonFab Gen II risers go for $120+ new.
I will consider the risers; how hard is the install? It sounds like something I'd be able to attempt myself......or? Way more cost effective than the Sato rearsets I was considering- hence why I said it was "either or".

I plan to stop by Thurs or Fri to local bike tuning shop that specialises in the R3 and other small bikes, get a better feel for pricing, install, support etc....for the suspension.
Sounds good to me. I think you'll be pretty impressed by how much of a change the risers will make.

The install is super simple. Basically you take two bolts out of the OEM rearsets on each side and then mount the risers in the factory position. Then you bolt the OEM rearsets up to the risers.

The only part that can take a little time is readjusting the pushrod for the shift linkage. I'm not sure what size pushrod you'll end up needing, but I think I have one I can include in the sale that should work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,206 Posts
Hey those look strangely familiar ;)

To answer OP's question, I'd do both. Of course it's always easy to suggest that without knowing a budget though. What's your $$ limit? I bet we can make some suggestions to stay within your budget while also upgrading both suspensions and rearsets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
If you'd have some interest, I'd be willing to part with a set of gently used NortonFab Generation II rearset risers (mentioned above) for $85 shipped to your door. They have one race weekend on them, and that's it. Like new.

In addition, I'm looking to part with a set of used gold eBay rearsets. These worked very well with the risers, I just didn't like the gold. They came with my R3 race bike when I got it. I just received a new set of black rearsets in the mail last week and no longer need these nor the risers. They have some wear on the heel guard, but they've never been down. Still shine up well. I'd part with these for $65 shipped to your door.

Buy both the risers and rearsets, and I'll give them to you for $130 shipped. Let me know!
Mind posting pics? Don't care for the gold but could use an extra set as a spare.
Below are a couple pics of the rearsets. The gold in the pics looks a little off, in my opinion. The flash changed the way the color looks. They are your typical anodized gold color like in the whole bike picture.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,519 Posts
Sounds good to me. I think you'll be pretty impressed by how much of a change the risers will make.

The install is super simple. Basically you take two bolts out of the OEM rearsets on each side and then mount the risers in the factory position. Then you bolt the OEM rearsets up to the risers.

The only part that can take a little time is readjusting the pushrod for the shift linkage. I'm not sure what size pushrod you'll end up needing, but I think I have one I can include in the sale that should work.
Installing them is easy. Uninstalling the stock ones are a notorious pain in the ass though. Invest in an impact driver if you don't have one already. Hit the 2 boots per side with it for a few seconds, and then you should be good. You may have to use an impact for a few seconds and then use a regular ratchet wrench after.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
The only part that can take a little time is readjusting the pushrod for the shift linkage. I'm not sure what size pushrod you'll end up needing, but I think I have one I can include in the sale that should work.
Adjusting the shifter is what has me worried- this is my first bike and I've never tinkered with major items before. I don't have an impact driver. I also don't want to start something and be unable to finish it; I have no garage and just a rear stand. I'm mildly mechanically adept but have just a smattering of hand tools and don't want to get stuck halfway.

A photo (yes, I know, watermarked because I didn't buy) from last Monday: link
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,519 Posts
Adjusting the shifter is what has me worried- this is my first bike and I've never tinkered with major items before. I don't have an impact driver. I also don't want to start something and be unable to finish it; I have no garage and just a rear stand. I'm mildly mechanically adept but have just a smattering of hand tools and don't want to get stuck halfway.

A photo (yes, I know, watermarked because I didn't buy) from last Monday: link
Get the impact driver. A good Ryobi cordless cost me less than $100. It's not just going to be a bike tool either. Works as an all around screwdriver for the house as well. If you don't buy it, borrow one, but I highly suggest not starting without one. Those bolts are pretty bad. Be sure to,loctite everything you install, unless you are ok with it falling off while riding. Happened to me a few weeks ago.

Adjusting the shifter is not hard at all, take a good look at how it looks now and you will see that either side has a nut, which just locks it in place so it doesn't move from vibes. You loosen those on the new ones, then adjust the actual linkage until you get the shifter lever at the angle you want. Turning that linkage raises or lowers the shift lever. When you have it adjusted to your liking, you lock the locking nuts.
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top