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Thanks! Maybe off but did you do any chain/sprocket replacement? If so gonna need to hookup a Speedo Healer to straighten it out. Other then that maybe tucking position can adjust if it makes any difference.
Youre not off at all bud. I dont know how many teeth, but its had a did chain and jg sprocket swap. I might need a speedo healer. Im about 185 with about 40 pounds of gear. So im on the heavy side of R3 pilots. My buddy that hit 117 has a highly upgraded R3, weighs about 140, and has light gear.
My tucks?
Hahaha..
some of the tightest the world has ever seen my friend.
 

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I wouldn't blindly believe that 117mph is an objective speed unless we have an evidence from the topo maps that that particluar strip of the road where this speed was recorded was an even surface and not a downward slope. Also the weight of the rider matters A LOT, the wind, gearing, tire circumference, bike tuning. If the gearing or tyre size was changed, the speedo will lie and speedo healer is required. Even with a speedo healer, you don't want to have it configured as "spot on", you will want to add a little margin, maybe about 5% extra to the displayed speed and the overall accuracy is up to the one who tuned it. So a lot of IFs... I'd say 100-102mph is a decent figure.
Interesting. What is a speedo healer? Where would one locate a speedo healer?
 

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Interesting. What is a speedo healer? Where would one locate a speedo healer?
It's literally the first thing that pops up when you google speedo healer but it's not necessary unless you changed your gearing or significantly changed your tire size. Your drop in top speed is likely caused by your poor fuel mapping but top speed fluctuates depending on rider weight and weather.
 

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Thanks. Im more of a bing guy, but thanks. I bet the gearing was changed. I be rocking big fat Pirellis. I might have fuel mapping issues. Rider weight and weather dont change much here. Ive been about 185 since college. Weather is great here. We have about 330 ridable days a year here. It gets windy sometimes.
68103

Umm. For $100+ ill guesstimate my speed.
 

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Keep in mind if you're not running factory sprocket ratio and tire sizes, your odometer will be affected as well.

I've also run nothing but 87 octane in my bike for over 5,000mi. Never had any issues.

Stock gearing with 520 sprockets, i can hover at around 109 in a full tuck with no backpack and no head/tail wind. 5'-11" and 185#.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
This is what the US manual says. I have always used 87 octane and never had a problem and mileage is great.


View attachment 68101
Haha what?? Thank you for finding this, maybe the manual I was looking at was from another country. But do they make the bike different in the UK? I thought it'd be the same?? It's an R3! But thank goodness I can save 50% on gas money thanks to you.. and @EngineeringAnon
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Keep in mind if you're not running factory sprocket ratio and tire sizes, your odometer will be affected as well.

I've also run nothing but 87 octane in my bike for over 5,000mi. Never had any issues.

Stock gearing with 520 sprockets, i can hover at around 109 in a full tuck with no backpack and no head/tail wind. 5'-11" and 185#.
Do 520 sprockets increase or decrease top end? Actually.. what are they used for?
edit: what's wrong with the factory sprockets
 

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520 is the stock pitch but I went with some lightened steel ones. You can also go aluminum and/or drop down to a 415. All of these reduce the rotating mass, which effectively allows you to put more power down to the wheel. There are threads-a-plenty with regard to swapping out the factory sprockets for either lightweight ones. As long as the factory gearing is maintained, should improve performance without having to make any additional tweaks to the bike.
 

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I wouldn't go for lightweight sprockets unless your are competing at the race track. They wear out a lot faster and cost a lot more than standard steel sprockets.

Also, to answer the question about the speedo healer. If your speedo is showing 100 but the real GPS speed is 80 it will affect your odometer reading. Your milage will be scaling faster, it will show that the bike has traveled more miles than it actually has. This is another reason to install one if you've changed your sprocket size.

Also when people go 1 tyre size wider from 140/70 to 150/60, the 150/60 is actually smaller diameter so it rotates faster than 140/70 and your speedo error is even higher now (shows higher speed than it actually is). It does not require any speedo healer as the error isn't that drastic as compared to sprocket size change but still something to consider.
 

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I wouldn't go for lightweight sprockets unless your are competing at the race track. They wear out a lot faster and cost a lot more than standard steel sprockets.

Also, to answer the question about the speedo healer. If your speedo is showing 100 but the real GPS speed is 80 it will affect your odometer reading. Your milage will be scaling faster, it will show that the bike has traveled more miles than it actually has. This is another reason to install one if you've changed your sprocket size.

Also when people go 1 tyre size wider from 140/70 to 150/60, the 150/60 is actually smaller diameter so it rotates faster than 140/70 and your speedo error is even higher now (shows higher speed than it actually is). It does not require any speedo healer as the error isn't that drastic as compared to sprocket size change but still something to consider.
Per conversations with Jesse, it was my understanding that the Vortex lightened steel sprockets would have increased longevity compared to the aluminum versions. Is your experience with this different? Or is it just that the lightened steel ones won't last as long as the factory ones? If that's the case, I'm curious why that would be.

Regardless, once I pick up the Striple, I plan on turning the R3 into a track-only bike and swapping in aluminum sprockets (among other things). Can't wait for that day...
 

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Per conversations with Jesse, it was my understanding that the Vortex lightened steel sprockets would have increased longevity compared to the aluminum versions. Is your experience with this different? Or is it just that the lightened steel ones won't last as long as the factory ones? If that's the case, I'm curious why that would be.

Regardless, once I pick up the Striple, I plan on turning the R3 into a track-only bike and swapping in aluminum sprockets (among other things). Can't wait for that day...
I was talking about the aluminuim ones. I don't have experience with lightened steel.
 
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