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Hey everyone,

This is my first bike and I love it. Unfortunately, I wiped out slow speed, hammered front brakes and flipped over the handle bars when the back end kicked up! Oops!! I am ok, but the bike took some damage and I was hoping to get some advice on how to repair myself or advice on what to do here on this forum.

:crying: The damage:

1. Right mirror broke off.
2. Right foot peg/brake the aluminum bracket/piece snapped right in half.
3. Right rear passenger foot peg snapped.
4. Rear passenger seat leather torn up.
5. Right rear tail cosmetic damage.

I can take some pictures after work and post them so everyone can get a better idea.

First - I feel terrible. I was in disbelief when it happened. It was entirely my fault. I am still new and this was like my 5th ride on it. I have a new respect after this even though I thought I was already being super cautious. I intend on using my back break much more in the future. The biggest thing that sucks the most in this situation is that I will be without a bike until I can get this fixed. ! If I can at least fix items 1 and 2 I can ride again so that is my priority.

I have called around to a few repair shops and looks like it will cost about $1000-1500 in repairs to fix all items with most parts being 3 weeks away. If I claim on insurance it will cost me more in the long run then if i were to just pay up front. I would also like to take this opportunity to learn more about my bike and do the repair myself, if possible/recommended.

My questions are:

How difficult would it be for me to repair items 1 and 2 on my own?

I am having difficulty finding where to buy the parts, where in your opinions are the best place to get replacement parts?

Are there perhaps some better aftermarket parts I should use instead when I do the repair?

Do I need any special tools to do the repair myself?


I want to say thank you to everyone who took the time to read my post. I really appreciate any help and wisdom you can share with me.
 

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Hey everyone,

This is my first bike and I love it. Unfortunately, I wiped out slow speed, hammered front brakes and flipped over the handle bars when the back end kicked up! Oops!! I am ok, but the bike took some damage and I was hoping to get some advice on how to repair myself or advice on what to do here on this forum.

:crying: The damage:

1. Right mirror broke off.
2. Right foot peg/brake the aluminum bracket/piece snapped right in half.
3. Right rear passenger foot peg snapped.
4. Rear passenger seat leather torn up.
5. Right rear tail cosmetic damage.

I can take some pictures after work and post them so everyone can get a better idea.

First - I feel terrible. I was in disbelief when it happened. It was entirely my fault. I am still new and this was like my 5th ride on it. I have a new respect after this even though I thought I was already being super cautious. I intend on using my back break much more in the future. The biggest thing that sucks the most in this situation is that I will be without a bike until I can get this fixed. ! If I can at least fix items 1 and 2 I can ride again so that is my priority.

I have called around to a few repair shops and looks like it will cost about $1000-1500 in repairs to fix all items with most parts being 3 weeks away. If I claim on insurance it will cost me more in the long run then if i were to just pay up front. I would also like to take this opportunity to learn more about my bike and do the repair myself, if possible/recommended.

My questions are:

How difficult would it be for me to repair items 1 and 2 on my own?

I am having difficulty finding where to buy the parts, where in your opinions are the best place to get replacement parts?

Are there perhaps some better aftermarket parts I should use instead when I do the repair?

Do I need any special tools to do the repair myself?


I want to say thank you to everyone who took the time to read my post. I really appreciate any help and wisdom you can share with me.


Aww man, Sorry to hear this.... I'm sure you'll get plenty of advice from people here on how not to let this happen again, but let's get to your issue, because of course you want to get back on that pony and keep learning.


*note - most of the damage you reported can still be ridden while being ordered or saving up some $$
All parts can be ordered from this website...there are more but I've looked and these prices are the same or better than the other sites I've viewed:
http://www.gearhead.com/oem-parts/yamaha/sport-bike.html?aribrand=YAM&s2=motorcycle




1) mirrors are easy to replace, a few screws and replace. However, now might be the time to think about replacing the mirrors with ones that actually work (LOL). Many of us have been complaining about the mirrors and only seeing elbows (without dipping our head).
2) foot pegs are very generic. you can order OEM or get some cool ones online just about any motorcycle website. I'd say they all are universal fits too.
[The above two you need to fix at least before getting on the road safety/law]
3) same as #2 ....or if you replace your front pegs, use the non-broken one for your one broken rear.
4) you can get either a new saddle (from the above website), or a saddle cover with some extra cushion (which will hold you over until either more saddles are available or you can save up some $$)
5) this may be expensive...unfortunately. The parts on the site above but not sure what you'll need without seeing it. Depending on how bad it is, you may want to consider a fender eliminator (which will fix any "fender" issues along with blinkers and license plate holder). If the break light is busted, you can replace that with OEM or get an aftermarket one (revzilla or motostarz might be a good place to start). Follow either the YZFR3 and FZ07 models as they seem to use the same light.


Doing it yourself....very possible and saving you the (whatever) $70-90 bucks an hour the dealers charge (this is primarily where the $1000+ comes from).


some part you may have to wait for....like the OEM mirrors or seat, but all the others you should be able to get right away.
 

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also....concerning the back brake: many people will tell you it has little traction, doesn't perform well (because of the disk/surface size of the brake and rotor), the back rises up while decelerating and further reduces traction, and more....


what I will say is: I LOVE IT!


If you ride safe and are paying attention, you can use the back brake like I do....
- While downshifting to a red light. And I mean, not just to turn on the brake light, but I actually use it to slow me down too without using any front brake as I'm utilizing my hand for throttle bumps - although I still cover the front brakes in case someone changes lanes, etc..
- Parking lots and low speeds. This is actually supposed to improved low-speed turns...but I donno. I just use it in this situation to reduce jerky clutch movements (especially on left turns as my hand/wrist is already being moved around and not very static on the bars).
- I actually use the rear brake as I approach canyon turns. This absolutely works well. more controlled response, places pressure on the front wheel (just like the front brake does), and if used well (with practice) can actually improve your fast corning (but you need to MASTER this before doing it....if that back brake isn't used delicately you risk a lockup (which will be way worse than your recent mishap).
- Stopped or stopped on a hill...we've all been there! At stop lights (all the time), I only use the rear brake to keep from rolling. I keep it on until just after I raise my left foot from the ground (which is usually pretty quick, but it's a good habit to have an order or process you can burn into your brain...then you don't even think about it, your body just does it automatically).
- Using the rear break somewhat regularly will help you in times of panic. Many people forget about the brake and rely only on the front. In an emergency situation, you should practice this BTW, (simultaneously) both feet push down (gets you into 1st gear, applies back brake), and both hands working the levers. Just remember two things....left foot - click click click (just get into habit with 3 stomps). and right hand - easy nelly...bring that lever in slowly no matter how scared you are. Fist grabbing the front brake....well, you already learned that lesson.


I'm no pro, but when I learned how to ride on the street I watched a sh*t ton of video's online, read countless articles/books, chatted with friends, etc... and everything I heard from those sources, I tried. And I learned quickly not to trust everyone's opinion. You must remember people pick up bad habits in their riding experiences and it does not always apply to different riders, the bikes being used, the experience level of the rider, etc, etc...


So please !!! you can take what I wrote above and try it, but nothing is EVER set in stone, unless it works for YOU!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
@K.O Thanks man for all your help!! I very much appreciate your pro tips.

I went and took more photos of the bike and sadly will have to add more items to the damage list.

6. Right front nose scrapped.
7. Front hand brake warped.

You can see the photos here.

You can see for item 2 it broke right in half while the foot peg is twisted.


Can I get your opinion on damage?

What do I need to do to be at least ride-able again now that you have seen pictures?

I am not sure the part i need to buy for item 2?
 

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"First - I feel terrible. I was in disbelief when it happened. It was entirely my fault. I am still new and this was like my 5th ride on it."

Don't feel terrible....EVERYONE goes down!! Learn form your mistakes and you'll be a much better rider as your skills improve.

The above advice from other members is spot-on.
 

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Alright, assuming everything is cosmetic, yes most if not all damaged parts can be replaced. Some easier than others. The headlight will be a ***** because its one unit.

All in all, you will spend roughly 610.00 (not including tax if applicable) U.S. including shipping. The most expensive being the headlight assembly. Also that is NOT including stickers. So the 400 bucks (which tallies up to your quote of 1000) is labor which although it does sound high, seriously looking at each individual piece I can see why they would charge 400 bucks even though you can probably do it all by yourself in 1-2 days over time. Maybe 10-15 hours of work, I'm padding on a lot of extra hours for the consideration of a beginner.

1WD-F6280-10-00 mirror (brake side) $65
1WD-F4750-00-00 passenger seat assembly $83

1WD-XF172-30-P0 back side cover (under passenger seat) $12
1WD-H4303-00-00 headlight assembly $338

1WD-H3922-00-00 front brake lever $16

1WD-XF83F-10-P0 front plastics (over headlight) $16

1WD-F7443-00-00 heal guard bracket (the cracked thing) $46

1WD-F7461-00-00 front peg $10

1WD-F7441-00-00 passenger peg $10

For stickers, roughly add 10-20 dollars.

Also there is a big chance there are damaged parts that you haven't taken pics of or that I could not see in all your pics.

Oh yeah, also if it bothers you:

1WD-F6246-00-00 handle bar end (brake side) $8
 

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this kind of thing happens the most important thing is you are alright. you are in one peace and you learned from this experiance. just some food for thought while using the front brakes practice using just two fingers or just your trigger finger. the only finger i use to brake is my trigger finger only even when racing on the track by doing this you will never be able to over load the front wheel with too much brake pressure if you only use one finger.
 

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Don't despair my friend. Just look at it on the bright side... You got that first "bike down" experience out of the way and you are not injured. No matter what anyone tells you, everyone who puts their time in the saddle dumps the bike at some point. With new riders its usually within the first month or two. I went through it back in 2000. It's a crushing experience at first but it's a right of passage.

What the experience does is make you respect the motorcycle more and be aware that we are all just a minor mistake away from being on the ground. (Be it yours or someone else's mistake) Get the bike fixed up, get back out there and don't worry about it.
 

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its alright happens to everyone. i was pushing my bike in the garage the other day with the kick stand down. the kick stand clipped the lip of the little step up into the garage and it went up but i didnt notice at the time. then when i start to lean the bike to put it on the kick stand it doesnt stop and just keeps going lol. and eventually my bike was laid down on the floor. it didnt fall hard i tried to lay it down as slow as possible. my shift lever got a little bent up and just a small tinnie tiny scratch on the fairing. yeah after that situation i felt like the biggest idiot in the world. so now i make sure everytime that the kick stand is down before leaning it over.
 

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I will say I don't think its so much about using more back brake, the front is a much more effective stopping tool then the rear, but bracing yourself for the braking. If you're not prepared to resist the hard braking force yes you go over the bars, pushing your weight back is the key to keeping the rear end down. not to mention becoming a bit smoother with your right fingers :D;) good luck!!
 

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What I do is first decide if I have the knowledge and patience to tackle the job. Fairings and me don't get along well. If it looks like too much, I would just have the dealer do it. On the other hand, it might be "fun" to buy a service manual, read up on stuff, order parts and go for it. Probably there is enough knowledge on the forum that if you run into problems, an explanation of the issue or a photo posted to the forum would get you the know-how to fix the thing. Sorry you wrecked your bike, but glad you are OK.
 

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With all respect to others giving advice on braking, you should never ever be concerned with which brake to use in which situation, especially a novice rider. Use BOTH brakes evenly in all braking situations. That's how it's taught in the rider's courses here in the states. The only exception to this rule is its okay to hold the bike in place at a stoplight using just one brake in the event you need to put both feet down or remove your right hand from the bars.

There may be situations when it's better to apply more of one brake or the other, but this is learned after many 1000's of hours of seat time.You will get yourself in trouble if you have to think too much about how much of which brake younare going to use. Remember, It is never a bad idea to apply both brakes evenly at any time you need to slow or stop the bike. The important thing is to get familiar with the feel of the brakes, not worrying how much front vs rear to apply.
 

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With all respect to others giving advice on braking, you should never ever be concerned with which brake to use in which situation, especially a novice rider. Use BOTH brakes evenly in all braking situations. That's how it's taught in the rider's courses here in the states. The only exception to this rule is its okay to hold the bike in place at a stoplight using just one brake in the event you need to put both feet down or remove your right hand from the bars.

There may be situations when it's better to apply more of one brake or the other, but this is learned after many 1000's of hours of seat time.You will get yourself in trouble if you have to think too much about how much of which brake younare going to use. Remember, It is never a bad idea to apply both brakes evenly at any time you need to slow or stop the bike. The important thing is to get familiar with the feel of the brakes, not worrying how much front vs rear to apply.
Both brakes in all situations hmm there are exceptions you can use both the front and rear brakes for straight line stopping but while in a turn at lean angle its a different story. Rather then confuse anyone any further the use of brakes is a different topic all togather.
 

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I'm sorry to hear bro, but don't feel bad, EVERYONE goes down, it's just a matter of when. The good news is you're ok.

First thing is that I disagree with K.O and Warlok9 about the back brake. I tell new riders to never use it to stop the bike for at least 6 months to a year. They teach you to use it in the riding course, but I still disagree 100% for sport bikes. Cruisers are a totally different animal as there is SOO much more weight on the rear wheel on a cruiser. The rear brake works great to hold the bike still at a red light, but that's it. The reason I say don't use it, is because new riders are especially not smooth in emergency situations, as you have noticed :) The back brake isn't so bad if you are going straight, but if you are turning and your emergency reaction is to slam your foot down on the back brake, you will crash, 100%, guaranteed. The back brake provides so little stopping force on a sport bike that is completely unnecessary. I still don't use my back brake and I race. Just my .02

As for repairing the bike, I have uploaded a lot of how-to-disassemble information on my blog, the link is in my signature, maybe some of that can help you save some money and do a lot of the work yourself. Sorry again, but don't worry, it happens, now you have learned something :)
 

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Gee...does this mean the brakes on the R3 aren't quite as "bad" as most of the reviews say?...lol


I think it's all about practice, practice, practice. If you haven't gone to the end of your neighborhood and slammed on a few, you'll never know you braking distance or how it responds. If you're not familiar with your bike capabilities, you generally won't find out until it's a situation that expectantly presents itself.


Even with soft brakes, if you know it's capability, you can deal with it and the situation you're in. (ex., ever "know" you can't make a certain stop....we've all had that. This is because you know your capability of the bike, so you do something in combination, like, turn a little to get a different angle, etc..).


Personally I think the brakes are fine. But cable brake lines and maybe some super fancy new pad might be enough upgrades if you're looking for more heat resistant performance.
 

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This I completely agree with. Along with telling new riders to not use the rear brake at all, I also force riders I'm working with to do exactly this. Drive their bike in a straight line, and slam on the front brake smoothly and as hard as possible, OVER AND OVER until they learn how powerful the front brake is, how their bike reacts to the brake, and how to apply it progressively, but quickly, so that the front suspension compresses before the wheel slides. I try to get them to lift the rear wheel off the ground so they understand how fast you can stop a sport bike if you need to, and how to prepare yourself for stopping it that fast.

As a side note, every race organization rulebook has a specific note that you have to HAVE a rear brake for safety (incase the front fails or you go off track). They spell this out specifically because a lot of racers would simply remove it otherwise :)


I think it's all about practice, practice, practice. If you haven't gone to the end of your neighborhood and slammed on a few, you'll never know you braking distance or how it responds. If you're not familiar with your bike capabilities, you generally won't find out until it's a situation that expectantly presents itself.


Even with soft brakes, if you know it's capability, you can deal with it and the situation you're in. (ex., ever "know" you can't make a certain stop....we've all had that. This is because you know your capability of the bike, so you do something in combination, like, turn a little to get a different angle, etc..).


Personally I think the brakes are fine. But cable brake lines and maybe some super fancy new pad might be enough upgrades if you're looking for more heat resistant performance.
 

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This is along the same school of thought that car drivers who grow up around snow, or motorcycle riders who ride dirt first are much safer in emergency situations because they learn to be comfortable and relaxed when the car or bike loses traction. They learn to expect it, and they have intentionally lost traction for fun. That way you don't panic when you lose traction unexpectedly. Force yourself to react to an emergency before you have one :)
 

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I'm sorry to hear bro, but don't feel bad, EVERYONE goes down, it's just a matter of when. The good news is you're ok.

First thing is that I disagree with K.O and Warlok9 about the back brake. I tell new riders to never use it to stop the bike for at least 6 months to a year. They teach you to use it in the riding course, but I still disagree 100% for sport bikes. Cruisers are a totally different animal as there is SOO much more weight on the rear wheel on a cruiser. The rear brake works great to hold the bike still at a red light, but that's it. The reason I say don't use it, is because new riders are especially not smooth in emergency situations, as you have noticed :) The back brake isn't so bad if you are going straight, but if you are turning and your emergency reaction is to slam your foot down on the back brake, you will crash, 100%, guaranteed. The back brake provides so little stopping force on a sport bike that is completely unnecessary. I still don't use my back brake and I race. Just my .02

As for repairing the bike, I have uploaded a lot of how-to-disassemble information on my blog, the link is in my signature, maybe some of that can help you save some money and do a lot of the work yourself. What color is your bike?


love your website....btw.


but I want to throw one thing out (self-defense hahaha)..... I always keep my toes on the peg unless I need either the brake or to shift. When reaching for the rear brake, I move my boots arch over the peg (so the boot heal is not actually on the peg, only being braced/wedged - granted I do wear size 13) and this leaves one with just about 2-3 inches of actual contact with the break. I find it hard to "slam" the rear. If you're wearing proper boots, the 'down-toe' motion is not in a natural position (requiring muscle movement) and even when I lean my foot forward, at most I get is half way down. This makes the rear brake more of a "slowing" break, but not a "stopping" brake.


New riders definitely need to be 100% comfortable with he front break and should use it frequently until they get used to it's capabilities. One poster wrote "use the two fingers" for the front. This is really good advice as the rider won't have the strength to pull too much; same holds true for the rear.


I think everyone has their own experiences on brakes....I believe in my first post I also said, don't always trust others opinions without trying them out and seeing what works for you (them). There are of course "best-practices", but there are also many variables.


what I was really hoping to convey is the acceptance 'some' people have with the rear brake and its use...and don't always heed the advice against it.
 

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Alright, assuming everything is cosmetic, yes most if not all damaged parts can be replaced. Some easier than others. The headlight will be a ***** because its one unit.

All in all, you will spend roughly 610.00 (not including tax if applicable) U.S. including shipping. The most expensive being the headlight assembly. Also that is NOT including stickers. So the 400 bucks (which tallies up to your quote of 1000) is labor which although it does sound high, seriously looking at each individual piece I can see why they would charge 400 bucks even though you can probably do it all by yourself in 1-2 days over time. Maybe 10-15 hours of work, I'm padding on a lot of extra hours for the consideration of a beginner.

1WD-F6280-10-00 mirror (brake side) $65
1WD-F4750-00-00 passenger seat assembly $83

1WD-XF172-30-P0 back side cover (under passenger seat) $12
1WD-H4303-00-00 headlight assembly $338

1WD-H3922-00-00 front brake lever $16

1WD-XF83F-10-P0 front plastics (over headlight) $16

1WD-F7443-00-00 heal guard bracket (the cracked thing) $46

1WD-F7461-00-00 front peg $10

1WD-F7441-00-00 passenger peg $10

For stickers, roughly add 10-20 dollars.

Also there is a big chance there are damaged parts that you haven't taken pics of or that I could not see in all your pics.

Oh yeah, also if it bothers you:

1WD-F6246-00-00 handle bar end (brake side) $8

Hello Bro,, I'm Sorry for that incident before
here is my calculation after asking my friend that work in Dealer
OEM Parts and price
1WD-F6280-10-00 $25
1WD-F4750-00-00 $30
1WD-XF172-30-P1 $9
1WD-H4303-00-00 $195
1WD-H3922-00-00 $9
1WD-XF83F-10-P0 $12
1WD-F7443-00-00 $26
1WD-F7461-00-00 $5
1WD-F7441-00-00 $5
1WD-F6246-00-00 $6
total $322

all those parts is genuine, it was shocking me that the price is so different over there
shipping up to 5Kg about $80
 
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