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I am sorry to see all the wrecks / crashes/ lay downs that are occurring with so many R-3 riders. My feelings go out to all that have dropped or otherwise torn up their bike or themselves, and hope all will be fine - and get their bikes back to 100%.
However, it does bring to mind - and no criticism intended - that too many riders are pushing the envelope and going beyond their limits.
And I understand gravel, an unforeseen rock etc. These are everyday hazards we all encounter, and driving defensively only as far as one can see will prevent most of these mishaps. Blind curves are no place to scrape the pegs......
I also feel the R-3 handles so well, has a reasonable power band, that it instills a sense of security that gets riders into trouble before they know it.
I would encourage all for continued longevity of the body and bike, to approach riding with a bit more caution.........keep the rubber down.

Riding over 45 years, enjoying every mile - and never any road rash on myself or a bike....(knock on wood)
 

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I am sorry to see all the wrecks / crashes/ lay downs that are occurring with so many R-3 riders. My feelings go out to all that have dropped or otherwise torn up their bike or themselves, and hope all will be fine - and get their bikes back to 100%.
However, it does bring to mind - and no criticism intended - that too many riders are pushing the envelope and going beyond their limits.
And I understand gravel, an unforeseen rock etc. These are everyday hazards we all encounter, and driving defensively only as far as one can see will prevent most of these mishaps. Blind curves are no place to scrape the pegs......
I also feel the R-3 handles so well, has a reasonable power band, that it instills a sense of security that gets riders into trouble before they know it.
I would encourage all for continued longevity of the body and bike, to approach riding with a bit more caution.........keep the rubber down.

Riding over 45 years, enjoying every mile - and never any road rash on myself or a bike....(knock on wood)
I don't mind crashing, at least not on the track. Means I pushed to the edge and made a mistake that I would otherwise might not be able to learn by just reading about or whatever. Some things have to be done to truly know in my opinion, and for myself and the riding I like to do, you have to be pushing to the limits so you can learn. I think for people that go to the track, crashing is just something that's bound to happen as you push yourself to new levels.
 

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I've been riding 10 years very heavily and I've never had a wreck other than when a lady hit me at a dead stop at a stoplight. I don't think that having a wreck means you're a bad rider or not having one means you're a good rider. Some people just have bad luck. My dad had a 50cc Sears motorcycle in the 60's. He had 3 wrecks in 3 months. He won't get near a motorcycle again.

I just hope if and when I have a bad accident I survive to learn from it.
 

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I've been riding 10 years very heavily and I've never had a wreck other than when a lady hit me at a dead stop at a stoplight. I don't think that having a wreck means you're a bad rider or not having one means you're a good rider. Some people just have bad luck. My dad had a 50cc Sears motorcycle in the 60's. He had 3 wrecks in 3 months. He won't get near a motorcycle again.

I just hope if and when I have a bad accident I survive to learn from it.
Agree with all you said in the first paragraph. As for the second, good gear will help a lot.
 
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