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Welcome! There's a few threads around that have discussed this. If I recall there were a few riders upwards of 60k, even up to 80k with no real issues.

Other than normal motorcycle maintenance and replacements, the first 'major' thing needed to be done is the valve clearance check. R3's a very reliable and somewhat bulletproof.
 

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Read of a 650 V-Strom recently that had just passed the 480,000 mile mark. Motor had never been apart, and if I remember correctly at least 5000 miles between oil changes with dino. I think your R3 should be good for at least 100 K if you give it a wee bit of love now and then.
 

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Is there any known major issues with the r3 at certain miles? Had my r3 for 2 years and 10000 miles might switch to a vfr800 but it is conceivable that the r3's could push 100,000 miles reliably. Who has the highest mileage r3.
This is a topic that is always of interest to me as well. It's basically the first thing I try to learn about any bike. So, great minds, I guess, haha... Anyway, it depends a bit on the model year. Some of the pre-2019 models did have some serious issues. I don't remember what all, but it was enough that I would personally never buy one older than 2019. Some people are much less concerned about such things and wouldn't worry about it.

Anyway, I'm expecting a solid 50k and hoping for 100k out of the R3 (also, I assume you're referring to MILES, and not kilometers, as of course 100k km is only about 60k miles). To be honest, if you can make it 100,000 miles without ever wadding up a street bike, you're doing quite well! Still I like to think I can avoid physically destroying the R3 and myself before something lets go in the powertrain LOL.

So far, I've only accumulated 3,600 miles on my 2019 R3.

Welcome to the optimistically-eyeballing-100k club! I know there are some bikes out there (e.g. the Strom mentioned above) that have done some pretty ridiculous mileage. I think for the most part, if a particular machine doesn't have any major design imperfections, engineering flaws, or quality control failures, and is a relatively low stress powerplant (i.e. NOT a race bike motor), it should be able to do at least 50k -- even if single cylinder, and hypothetically a fair bit more as a twin or four cylinder. I have seen, over the years, some things like a CBR 600 and a Hayabusa that hove gone to multiple hundreds of thousands of miles without internal engine work. A lot of a motor's shelf life comes down to a pretty wide array of factors -- such as if the owner lets it warm up a bit before ham fisting the throttle on cold mornings, if the owner makes sure the oil level isn't allowed to get low between changes, how hard it gets hammered on in general, average speed and engine RPM, terrain conditions (i.e. around town vs. highway vs. out in the hills vs. race track), the quality and frequency of maintenance services, etc.

Anyway, having researched this quite a bit myself in the past, I can confidently say that a 2019+ R3 is going to be a really solid machine, barring some kind of quality control issue that could always pop up or whatever (nothing that I'm aware of currently in that regard).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for the replies guys you had some pretty insightful stuff. When the borders open I plan on doing a 6000 mile roadtrip around Europe. I can't conseive the possibility of selling my r3 at the moment but knowing myself and the fact that I'm getting a full licence. The chance of me going to a bike shop and picking a 600/800 is quite high.
 

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Some of the pre-2019 models did have some serious issues. I don't remember what all, but it was enough that I would personally never buy one older than 2019.
I stumbled on this old thread. I'm curious if others have similar opinions on the reliability of pre-2019 models. Frankly, if the 2015-2018 R3's have serious flaws, it's news to me. Anyhow, I'm curious what others think. Is this is one person's opinion (and he/she omitted to provide any details to substantiate his/her claim) or is this general and accepted knowledge? And if there are serious flaws, well what are they?
 

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I'm not sure what issues they had in mind. There were indeed some Safety Recalls issued the few years following the R3's 2015 introduction. But, I'm unaware of any real mechanical problems. It's engine has been rock solid and the few tranny/shift problems have been dealt with by the factory safety recalls at Yamaha's expense. I think Yamaha has been aggressively proactive taking care of potential problems to justify their, almost annual, reputation of being among the top manufacturers in customer satisfaction.
 
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