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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you ever get into a embarrassing accident (where everyone involved walked away okay) don't beat yourself up about it for too long. Learn from your mistakes and move on.
As it so happens a few days ago I crashed my bike although it could have been much worse. Honestly for it to happen in that place in such a way I must be pretty lucky.

Believe me when I say I was embarrassed, felt like a disappointment, sat at home and didn't do or talk to anyone for days after. I tore myself apart wondering how, like really did that just happen? How stupid can you be?

I was all at fault, leaving the highway off ramp:
1. Was in the wrong gear entering the turn
2. Was going too fast
3. Was too close to the person in front of me who slowed down ahead quicker then I thought
4. Target f----- (See I told myself I would never do this) fixated

All of this happened after a cold 1 hour commute where it seemed I must have been tired.
I hit the curb as parallel as I could of with the bike (pushing on the right handlebar and leaning as much as possible) and then flew off the bike and did a flip before I landed on my back (soft grass). Half the bike was on the road has was on the grass. So then I got up right away and ran to turn off the bike completely oblivious to any injury I might have had. Three or four people pulled over to see if I was okay, the first one in a truck asking "are you okay? Do you know how to brake?" :| Ya I felt like garbage and rightfully so.

Checked over my equipment and bike to see surprising next to no huge damage from the 40km/h accident.... 2 scratched fairing pieces, a bent shift lever, a broken foot peg, and a slightly scratched exhaust. The bike didn't slide far and I moved the bike out of the way right away and didn't have my Go Pro so its a bummer I didn't get pictures of the scene. No leaks no major damage. Went to move the bike across the road and it fell over on the other side! :mad:

I then had my dad meet up and I rode the bike back 1 hour home again right behind him (not the smartest thing, but it worked).
What an experience. I have finally stopped staring at the wall to write this post and realize that "things" can be replaced and lessons are learned.

Always agree with ATGATT and looking forward to riding again after I inspect the bike further.
 

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Glad you are ok. At least you crashed on a relatively cheap bike and a relatively low powered one. It could have been on a more powerful bike with you street Rossi'ing it up and been doing like a triple somersault or something. Kidding aside, th damage seems minimal. My first crash was on a bike with a something like 65 HP and I snapped the forks clean in half. I walked away from that crash though.
 

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I really enjoyed your post. Mostly the message of 'reflect and learn from the experience'. Glad you're ok and that the bike is mostly ok.

I liked your insights into;
a) assuming responsibility for any mistakes (most motorcyclists make excuses)
b) the things you do when in shock (getting up and walking oblivious to injury, and then knocking it over the opposite side)
c) analysis of the reasons (speed, gearing, target fixation)
d) not beating yourself up over it - learn; make it positive - these are mistakes any and all of us can/do make, regardless of experience. target fixation for instance is hardwired to our brain.

...and lastly, ATGATT! Probably made the difference in this being an experience to learn from, or to heal from.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ya it just the cost that gets to me, but I knew that getting into riding. If you can believe it I am a pretty defensive rider!
 

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From the pictures it looks like your frame sliders did their job pretty well! Could've been quite a few more scratches on that bike if those weren't installed.
 

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As you mention:

FOLLOWING DISTANCE.

If you establish it and keep it you stay out of most trouble in traffic. It's not just the added reaction time or the ability to force tailgaters to slow gradually as you approach stops, it's the added visibility it gives you to see what's going on before you're in it.

Very glad you're OK.
 
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